Is Homework Valuable or Not? Try Looking at Quality Instead

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Is there an end in sight to the “homework wars?”

Homework is one those never-ending debates in K-12 circles that re-emerges every few years, bringing with it a new collection of headlines. Usually they bemoan how much homework students have, or highlight districts and even states that have sought to cap or eliminate homework .

Now, a new analysis from the Center for American Progress suggests a more fruitful way of thinking about this problem. Maybe, it suggests, what we should be doing is looking at what students are routinely being asked to do in take-home assignments, how well that homework supports their learning goals (or doesn’t), and make changes from there.

The analysis of nearly 200 pieces of homework concludes that much of what students are asked to do aligns to the Common Core State Standards—a testament to how pervasive the standards are in the U.S. education system, even though many states have tweaked, renamed, or replaced them. However, most of the homework embodied basic, procedural components of the standards, rather than the more difficult skills—such as analyzing or extending their knowledge to new problems.

“We were surprised by the degree of alignment. And we were also surprised by the degree that the homework was rote, and how much some of this stuff felt like Sudoku,” said Ulrich Boser, a senior fellow at CAP. “It made the homework debate make a lot more sense about why parents are frustrated.”

It is also similar to the findings of groups like the Education Trust, which have found that classwork tends to be aligned to state standards, but not all that rigorous.

Collecting Homework Samples

The CAP analysis appears to be one of the first studies to look at homework rigor using a national survey lens. Many studies of homework are based on one school or one district’s assignments, which obviously limits their applicability. Attempts to synthesize all this research have led to some hard-to-parse conclusions. One of the most cited studies concludes there’s some connection for grades 6-12 between homework and test scores, but less so for elementary students, and less of an impact on actual grades.

Another problem is that students’ experiences with homework seem to vary so dramatically: A Brookings Institution report based on survey data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress concluded that, while on average students aren’t overburdened by homework, a subset of students do appear to get hours upon hours.

The CAP analysis, instead, was based on getting a sample of parents from across the country to send in examples of their children’s homework. The researchers used MTurk, a crowdsourcing service offered by Amazon.com to recruit parents. Of the 372 parents who responded, the researchers got a pile of 187 useable assignments. Next, John Smithson, an emeritus researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, had teams grade them on a taxonomy looking at both the content and the “cognitive demand,” or difficulty, of the work. The index fell on a 1 to 10 scale, with a score 4 to 6 range considered as “good” alignment.

The results? On average, math assignments fell within this range, while the ELA ones were slightly weaker, in the 3 to 5 range.

But the real eye-opening graphic is this one, which shows that by far the assignments were mostly low-level.

why are homework a waste of time

This makes some logical sense when you think about it. Just as with teaching and testing, it is much easier to write homework assignments prioritizing basic arithmetic drills and fill-in-the-blank vocabulary words than ones that get students to “prove” or “generalize” some tenet. (I suspect prepackaged curricula, too, probably lean more toward rote stuff than cognitively demanding exercises.)

Here’s another explanation: Many teachers believe homework should be for practicing known content, not learning something new. This is partially to help close the “homework gap” that surfaces because some students can access parent help or help via technology, while other students can’t. It’s possible that teachers are purposefully giving lower-level work to their students to take home for this reason.

To be sure, Boser said, it’s not that all lower-level work is intrinsically bad: Memorization does have a place in learning. But assignments like color-in-the-blank and word searches are probably just a waste of students’ time. “Homework assignments,” the study says, “should be thought-provoking.”

Study Limitations

The study does come with some significant limitations, so you must use caution in discussing its results. The surveyed population differs from the population at large, overrepresenting mothers over fathers and parents of K-5 students, and underrepresenting black parents. Also, the majority of the assignments the parents sent in came from the elementary grades.

The report makes suggestions on how districts can strategically improve the quality of their homework, rather than deciding to chuck it out altogether.

One is to is to audit homework assignments to make sure they’re actually useful at building some of the more difficult skills. Another is to extend the “curriculum revolution” of the last decade, which has focused more attention on the quality and alignment of textbooks and materials, to homework. A third is to use appropriate technology so students can access out-of-school supports for challenging homework.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Curriculum Matters blog.

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Nobody knows what the point of homework is

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As the Covid-19 pandemic began and students logged into their remote classrooms, all work, in effect, became homework. But whether or not students could complete it at home varied. For some, schoolwork became public-library work or McDonald’s-parking-lot work.

Luis Torres, the principal of PS 55, a predominantly low-income community elementary school in the south Bronx, told me that his school secured Chromebooks for students early in the pandemic only to learn that some lived in shelters that blocked wifi for security reasons. Others, who lived in housing projects with poor internet reception, did their schoolwork in laundromats.

According to a 2021 Pew survey , 25 percent of lower-income parents said their children, at some point, were unable to complete their schoolwork because they couldn’t access a computer at home; that number for upper-income parents was 2 percent.

The issues with remote learning in March 2020 were new. But they highlighted a divide that had been there all along in another form: homework. And even long after schools have resumed in-person classes, the pandemic’s effects on homework have lingered.

Over the past three years, in response to concerns about equity, schools across the country, including in Sacramento, Los Angeles , San Diego , and Clark County, Nevada , made permanent changes to their homework policies that restricted how much homework could be given and how it could be graded after in-person learning resumed.

Three years into the pandemic, as districts and teachers reckon with Covid-era overhauls of teaching and learning, schools are still reconsidering the purpose and place of homework. Whether relaxing homework expectations helps level the playing field between students or harms them by decreasing rigor is a divisive issue without conclusive evidence on either side, echoing other debates in education like the elimination of standardized test scores from some colleges’ admissions processes.

I first began to wonder if the homework abolition movement made sense after speaking with teachers in some Massachusetts public schools, who argued that rather than help disadvantaged kids, stringent homework restrictions communicated an attitude of low expectations. One, an English teacher, said she felt the school had “just given up” on trying to get the students to do work; another argued that restrictions that prohibit teachers from assigning take-home work that doesn’t begin in class made it difficult to get through the foreign-language curriculum. Teachers in other districts have raised formal concerns about homework abolition’s ability to close gaps among students rather than widening them.

Many education experts share this view. Harris Cooper, a professor emeritus of psychology at Duke who has studied homework efficacy, likened homework abolition to “playing to the lowest common denominator.”

But as I learned after talking to a variety of stakeholders — from homework researchers to policymakers to parents of schoolchildren — whether to abolish homework probably isn’t the right question. More important is what kind of work students are sent home with and where they can complete it. Chances are, if schools think more deeply about giving constructive work, time spent on homework will come down regardless.

There’s no consensus on whether homework works

The rise of the no-homework movement during the Covid-19 pandemic tapped into long-running disagreements over homework’s impact on students. The purpose and effectiveness of homework have been disputed for well over a century. In 1901, for instance, California banned homework for students up to age 15, and limited it for older students, over concerns that it endangered children’s mental and physical health. The newest iteration of the anti-homework argument contends that the current practice punishes students who lack support and rewards those with more resources, reinforcing the “myth of meritocracy.”

But there is still no research consensus on homework’s effectiveness; no one can seem to agree on what the right metrics are. Much of the debate relies on anecdotes, intuition, or speculation.

Researchers disagree even on how much research exists on the value of homework. Kathleen Budge, the co-author of Turning High-Poverty Schools Into High-Performing Schools and a professor at Boise State, told me that homework “has been greatly researched.” Denise Pope, a Stanford lecturer and leader of the education nonprofit Challenge Success, said, “It’s not a highly researched area because of some of the methodological problems.”

Experts who are more sympathetic to take-home assignments generally support the “10-minute rule,” a framework that estimates the ideal amount of homework on any given night by multiplying the student’s grade by 10 minutes. (A ninth grader, for example, would have about 90 minutes of work a night.) Homework proponents argue that while it is difficult to design randomized control studies to test homework’s effectiveness, the vast majority of existing studies show a strong positive correlation between homework and high academic achievement for middle and high school students. Prominent critics of homework argue that these correlational studies are unreliable and point to studies that suggest a neutral or negative effect on student performance. Both agree there is little to no evidence for homework’s effectiveness at an elementary school level, though proponents often argue that it builds constructive habits for the future.

For anyone who remembers homework assignments from both good and bad teachers, this fundamental disagreement might not be surprising. Some homework is pointless and frustrating to complete. Every week during my senior year of high school, I had to analyze a poem for English and decorate it with images found on Google; my most distinct memory from that class is receiving a demoralizing 25-point deduction because I failed to present my analysis on a poster board. Other assignments really do help students learn: After making an adapted version of Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book for a ninth grade history project, I was inspired to check out from the library and read a biography of the Chinese ruler.

For homework opponents, the first example is more likely to resonate. “We’re all familiar with the negative effects of homework: stress, exhaustion, family conflict, less time for other activities, diminished interest in learning,” Alfie Kohn, author of The Homework Myth, which challenges common justifications for homework, told me in an email. “And these effects may be most pronounced among low-income students.” Kohn believes that schools should make permanent any moratoria implemented during the pandemic, arguing that there are no positives at all to outweigh homework’s downsides. Recent studies , he argues , show the benefits may not even materialize during high school.

In the Marlborough Public Schools, a suburban district 45 minutes west of Boston, school policy committee chair Katherine Hennessy described getting kids to complete their homework during remote education as “a challenge, to say the least.” Teachers found that students who spent all day on their computers didn’t want to spend more time online when the day was over. So, for a few months, the school relaxed the usual practice and teachers slashed the quantity of nightly homework.

Online learning made the preexisting divides between students more apparent, she said. Many students, even during normal circumstances, lacked resources to keep them on track and focused on completing take-home assignments. Though Marlborough Schools is more affluent than PS 55, Hennessy said many students had parents whose work schedules left them unable to provide homework help in the evenings. The experience tracked with a common divide in the country between children of different socioeconomic backgrounds.

So in October 2021, months after the homework reduction began, the Marlborough committee made a change to the district’s policy. While teachers could still give homework, the assignments had to begin as classwork. And though teachers could acknowledge homework completion in a student’s participation grade, they couldn’t count homework as its own grading category. “Rigorous learning in the classroom does not mean that that classwork must be assigned every night,” the policy stated . “Extensions of class work is not to be used to teach new content or as a form of punishment.”

Canceling homework might not do anything for the achievement gap

The critiques of homework are valid as far as they go, but at a certain point, arguments against homework can defy the commonsense idea that to retain what they’re learning, students need to practice it.

“Doesn’t a kid become a better reader if he reads more? Doesn’t a kid learn his math facts better if he practices them?” said Cathy Vatterott, an education researcher and professor emeritus at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. After decades of research, she said it’s still hard to isolate the value of homework, but that doesn’t mean it should be abandoned.

Blanket vilification of homework can also conflate the unique challenges facing disadvantaged students as compared to affluent ones, which could have different solutions. “The kids in the low-income schools are being hurt because they’re being graded, unfairly, on time they just don’t have to do this stuff,” Pope told me. “And they’re still being held accountable for turning in assignments, whether they’re meaningful or not.” On the other side, “Palo Alto kids” — students in Silicon Valley’s stereotypically pressure-cooker public schools — “are just bombarded and overloaded and trying to stay above water.”

Merely getting rid of homework doesn’t solve either problem. The United States already has the second-highest disparity among OECD (the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) nations between time spent on homework by students of high and low socioeconomic status — a difference of more than three hours, said Janine Bempechat, clinical professor at Boston University and author of No More Mindless Homework .

When she interviewed teachers in Boston-area schools that had cut homework before the pandemic, Bempechat told me, “What they saw immediately was parents who could afford it immediately enrolled their children in the Russian School of Mathematics,” a math-enrichment program whose tuition ranges from $140 to about $400 a month. Getting rid of homework “does nothing for equity; it increases the opportunity gap between wealthier and less wealthy families,” she said. “That solution troubles me because it’s no solution at all.”

A group of teachers at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia, made the same point after the school district proposed an overhaul of its homework policies, including removing penalties for missing homework deadlines, allowing unlimited retakes, and prohibiting grading of homework.

“Given the emphasis on equity in today’s education systems,” they wrote in a letter to the school board, “we believe that some of the proposed changes will actually have a detrimental impact towards achieving this goal. Families that have means could still provide challenging and engaging academic experiences for their children and will continue to do so, especially if their children are not experiencing expected rigor in the classroom.” At a school where more than a third of students are low-income, the teachers argued, the policies would prompt students “to expect the least of themselves in terms of effort, results, and responsibility.”

Not all homework is created equal

Despite their opposing sides in the homework wars, most of the researchers I spoke to made a lot of the same points. Both Bempechat and Pope were quick to bring up how parents and schools confuse rigor with workload, treating the volume of assignments as a proxy for quality of learning. Bempechat, who is known for defending homework, has written extensively about how plenty of it lacks clear purpose, requires the purchasing of unnecessary supplies, and takes longer than it needs to. Likewise, when Pope instructs graduate-level classes on curriculum, she asks her students to think about the larger purpose they’re trying to achieve with homework: If they can get the job done in the classroom, there’s no point in sending home more work.

At its best, pandemic-era teaching facilitated that last approach. Honolulu-based teacher Christina Torres Cawdery told me that, early in the pandemic, she often had a cohort of kids in her classroom for four hours straight, as her school tried to avoid too much commingling. She couldn’t lecture for four hours, so she gave the students plenty of time to complete independent and project-based work. At the end of most school days, she didn’t feel the need to send them home with more to do.

A similar limited-homework philosophy worked at a public middle school in Chelsea, Massachusetts. A couple of teachers there turned as much class as possible into an opportunity for small-group practice, allowing kids to work on problems that traditionally would be assigned for homework, Jessica Flick, a math coach who leads department meetings at the school, told me. It was inspired by a philosophy pioneered by Simon Fraser University professor Peter Liljedahl, whose influential book Building Thinking Classrooms in Mathematics reframes homework as “check-your-understanding questions” rather than as compulsory work. Last year, Flick found that the two eighth grade classes whose teachers adopted this strategy performed the best on state tests, and this year, she has encouraged other teachers to implement it.

Teachers know that plenty of homework is tedious and unproductive. Jeannemarie Dawson De Quiroz, who has taught for more than 20 years in low-income Boston and Los Angeles pilot and charter schools, says that in her first years on the job she frequently assigned “drill and kill” tasks and questions that she now feels unfairly stumped students. She said designing good homework wasn’t part of her teaching programs, nor was it meaningfully discussed in professional development. With more experience, she turned as much class time as she could into practice time and limited what she sent home.

“The thing about homework that’s sticky is that not all homework is created equal,” says Jill Harrison Berg, a former teacher and the author of Uprooting Instructional Inequity . “Some homework is a genuine waste of time and requires lots of resources for no good reason. And other homework is really useful.”

Cutting homework has to be part of a larger strategy

The takeaways are clear: Schools can make cuts to homework, but those cuts should be part of a strategy to improve the quality of education for all students. If the point of homework was to provide more practice, districts should think about how students can make it up during class — or offer time during or after school for students to seek help from teachers. If it was to move the curriculum along, it’s worth considering whether strategies like Liljedahl’s can get more done in less time.

Some of the best thinking around effective assignments comes from those most critical of the current practice. Denise Pope proposes that, before assigning homework, teachers should consider whether students understand the purpose of the work and whether they can do it without help. If teachers think it’s something that can’t be done in class, they should be mindful of how much time it should take and the feedback they should provide. It’s questions like these that De Quiroz considered before reducing the volume of work she sent home.

More than a year after the new homework policy began in Marlborough, Hennessy still hears from parents who incorrectly “think homework isn’t happening” despite repeated assurances that kids still can receive work. She thinks part of the reason is that education has changed over the years. “I think what we’re trying to do is establish that homework may be an element of educating students,” she told me. “But it may not be what parents think of as what they grew up with. ... It’s going to need to adapt, per the teaching and the curriculum, and how it’s being delivered in each classroom.”

For the policy to work, faculty, parents, and students will all have to buy into a shared vision of what school ought to look like. The district is working on it — in November, it hosted and uploaded to YouTube a round-table discussion on homework between district administrators — but considering the sustained confusion, the path ahead seems difficult.

When I asked Luis Torres about whether he thought homework serves a useful part in PS 55’s curriculum, he said yes, of course it was — despite the effort and money it takes to keep the school open after hours to help them do it. “The children need the opportunity to practice,” he said. “If you don’t give them opportunities to practice what they learn, they’re going to forget.” But Torres doesn’t care if the work is done at home. The school stays open until around 6 pm on weekdays, even during breaks. Tutors through New York City’s Department of Youth and Community Development programs help kids with work after school so they don’t need to take it with them.

As schools weigh the purpose of homework in an unequal world, it’s tempting to dispose of a practice that presents real, practical problems to students across the country. But getting rid of homework is unlikely to do much good on its own. Before cutting it, it’s worth thinking about what good assignments are meant to do in the first place. It’s crucial that students from all socioeconomic backgrounds tackle complex quantitative problems and hone their reading and writing skills. It’s less important that the work comes home with them.

Jacob Sweet is a freelance writer in Somerville, Massachusetts. He is a frequent contributor to the New Yorker, among other publications.

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More than two hours of homework may be counterproductive, research suggests.

Education scholar Denise Pope has found that too much homework has negative impacts on student well-being and behavioral engagement (Shutterstock)

A Stanford education researcher found that too much homework can negatively affect kids, especially their lives away from school, where family, friends and activities matter.   "Our findings on the effects of homework challenge the traditional assumption that homework is inherently good," wrote Denise Pope , a senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and a co-author of a study published in the Journal of Experimental Education .   The researchers used survey data to examine perceptions about homework, student well-being and behavioral engagement in a sample of 4,317 students from 10 high-performing high schools in upper-middle-class California communities. Along with the survey data, Pope and her colleagues used open-ended answers to explore the students' views on homework.   Median household income exceeded $90,000 in these communities, and 93 percent of the students went on to college, either two-year or four-year.   Students in these schools average about 3.1 hours of homework each night.   "The findings address how current homework practices in privileged, high-performing schools sustain students' advantage in competitive climates yet hinder learning, full engagement and well-being," Pope wrote.   Pope and her colleagues found that too much homework can diminish its effectiveness and even be counterproductive. They cite prior research indicating that homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night, and that 90 minutes to two and a half hours is optimal for high school.   Their study found that too much homework is associated with:   • Greater stress : 56 percent of the students considered homework a primary source of stress, according to the survey data. Forty-three percent viewed tests as a primary stressor, while 33 percent put the pressure to get good grades in that category. Less than 1 percent of the students said homework was not a stressor.   • Reductions in health : In their open-ended answers, many students said their homework load led to sleep deprivation and other health problems. The researchers asked students whether they experienced health issues such as headaches, exhaustion, sleep deprivation, weight loss and stomach problems.   • Less time for friends, family and extracurricular pursuits : Both the survey data and student responses indicate that spending too much time on homework meant that students were "not meeting their developmental needs or cultivating other critical life skills," according to the researchers. Students were more likely to drop activities, not see friends or family, and not pursue hobbies they enjoy.   A balancing act   The results offer empirical evidence that many students struggle to find balance between homework, extracurricular activities and social time, the researchers said. Many students felt forced or obligated to choose homework over developing other talents or skills.   Also, there was no relationship between the time spent on homework and how much the student enjoyed it. The research quoted students as saying they often do homework they see as "pointless" or "mindless" in order to keep their grades up.   "This kind of busy work, by its very nature, discourages learning and instead promotes doing homework simply to get points," said Pope, who is also a co-founder of Challenge Success , a nonprofit organization affiliated with the GSE that conducts research and works with schools and parents to improve students' educational experiences..   Pope said the research calls into question the value of assigning large amounts of homework in high-performing schools. Homework should not be simply assigned as a routine practice, she said.   "Rather, any homework assigned should have a purpose and benefit, and it should be designed to cultivate learning and development," wrote Pope.   High-performing paradox   In places where students attend high-performing schools, too much homework can reduce their time to foster skills in the area of personal responsibility, the researchers concluded. "Young people are spending more time alone," they wrote, "which means less time for family and fewer opportunities to engage in their communities."   Student perspectives   The researchers say that while their open-ended or "self-reporting" methodology to gauge student concerns about homework may have limitations – some might regard it as an opportunity for "typical adolescent complaining" – it was important to learn firsthand what the students believe.   The paper was co-authored by Mollie Galloway from Lewis and Clark College and Jerusha Conner from Villanova University.

Clifton B. Parker is a writer at the Stanford News Service .

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Is homework a waste of time.

Young child doing homework on an iPad

Homework has always been one of the biggest challenges to school and home life, causing family tension, stress and time pressures.

Research from Stanford Graduate School of Education  conducted amongst 4,300 students highlighted that over 56 per cent considered homework to be a primary source of stress, whilst others reported increased levels of anxiety, sleep deprivation, exhaustion and weight loss.

After considerable review and debate, ACS Egham has decided to drop ‘traditional’ homework for students aged four to eleven.

The educational debate over the merits of homework has been going on a long time, with different countries taking very different approaches. Wanting to discover the best approach to setting homework to achieve optimal wellbeing for students and parents, our teaching team collaborated on a research project to help find the solution. Our findings highlighted that for homework to be truly effective, it must be highly personalised for each student. So we set about making these changes.

Traditional homework

Traditional homework or ‘busy work’, as we like to call it, is generic across a class, and does little to enhance the individual student learning experience. This kind of homework assumes that every student is the same, that each has the same maturity, concentration and ability level. It is, therefore… a bit lazy. As we all know, in real-life abilities vary enormously from one person to the next, and students can often find this type of homework very stressful, especially if they feel they have been set impossible tasks that they must face alone.

Children are already at school for some seven hours a day and ‘busy work’ simply eats up their free time, which they could be better spending with their families, or taking part in extra-curricular activities to refresh their minds and bodies. Younger students especially should be encouraged to use time after school for unstructured play and developing their own creativity.

Reflecting upon these issues, we decided to replace ‘busy work’ with a personal, guided approach building on class work and learning, which parents and students can share together, making the work more meaningful, manageable and worthwhile.

Personalised approaches

Instead of setting homework, ACS Egham teachers share with parents the learning topics for the upcoming term and suggest that these subjects are explored at home. The Lower School intranet hosts ‘talk topics’ which link in with lessons and can be discussed at home around the dinner table or during car journeys. We also include extra-curricular activities which tie in to each unit, such as visiting a museum, art exhibition, or hands on activities.

Arithmetic and literacy skills can also be enhanced at home without endless sums and compulsory reading times. Parents can help their children practice mathematical skills in everyday scenes; calculating a grocery budget, or measuring furniture on a trip to IKEA. Equally, parents are actively encouraged to read with students as much as they can, and for as long as it’s enjoyable. When reading is not a chore but an enjoyable activity, students’ literacy skills increase.

All these opportunities allow students to apply their class-based learning in a different context. In a multi-cultural class, exploring topics at home can be particularly important for students who have a native language other than English, giving them the forum in which to widen their vocabulary in their mother tongue. If students have struggled with a specific task, parents can notify the teachers, enabling teachers to give more targeted support in these areas.

Alternative education systems

In Finland, students are generally assigned virtually no homework; they don’t start school until age seven, and the school day is short. Despite this, Finland is considered to have one of the leading education systems in the world. Finnish students achieve some of the world’s best international PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) test results; in 2016 achieving fourth place in reading compared to the UK in 22nd place, and 12th place in maths, compared the UK in 27th place.

According to a BBC article, a key concept in the Finnish school system is trust, where there’s little homework and no culture of extra private tuition. This trust is built from parents’ trusting schools to deliver a good education within the school day, and schools putting trust in the quality of their teachers. This certainly resonates with our opinions on homework; if a student has been delivered a quality education in the school day, there should be no need to spend hours in the evening carrying out a rigid schedule of homework.

Developing skills for the future

We prepare our nine to eleven year olds for secondary education through ‘I-Inquiry’ projects. These are individual research topics which students investigate over a period of four to six weeks. Recently students designed, created and built virtual models of their own imaginary planets, following a unit of inquiry that explored the solar system.

Using their iPads, students researched the characteristics of different planets before creating and naming their own. The final projects were then presented back to the class using iPads, artistic drawings and in some cases, hand built models.

Through the I-Inquiry project, students developed a whole range of essential life skills. These included time management and organisational skills, as students were required to work on the project both at home and at school; independent inquiry, exploring different sources to create their planet; as well as helping develop a creative mindset. Students also enhanced their communication skills and public speaking through their final presentations. Most importantly, students were energised by their learning and engaged with their subjects on a much deeper level.

We strongly believe that setting homework for the sake of it doesn’t benefit children or prepare them in a robust way for their next steps. It can also be a cause of family stress and tension, and potentially even hinder the wellbeing of the student. Where we’ve adopted our new approach at ACS Egham, we can see our students develop life skills through extra-curricular activities, spending time with their friends and family, and engaging at home with meaningful, highly personalised tasks, like the I-Inquiry Projects, which equips them for success beyond education and develops a curious mind as well as a lifelong love of learning.

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Homework is a waste of time, new studies say

A new group of studies finds that homework in a variety of subjects has little impact on test grades, although math homework was the exception to the findings.

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TEACHING TECHNIQUES

Homework: Useful Teaching Tool or Waste of Time?

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  • May 18, 2021

is-homework-helpful

  • Helpful or harmful?

How is homework helpful?

  • Does homework promote learning?

Downsides of homework

  • Should students have homework?
  • Stress free homework tips

Homework. How can one little word cause so much trouble? Almost all schools require homework , but should they? Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of homework, plus what the research says you should really be doing after school. 

As a pupil in the UK, you will without a doubt encounter homework during your school years. Some kids love it, others… not so much! Many parents struggle to make their child complete their homework and to fit it into their family’s busy schedule, and many kids and teens find homework quite boring. But let’s put our feelings about homework to the side, and focus on a more important question – is homework really necessary?

is-homework-helpful

Is homework helpful or harmful?

Well, it depends. There’s loads of debate about homework and whether or not it helps you learn. Researchers have been trying to find the answer to this question since your parents were in school!

It all comes down to the purpose of the homework and the age of the student, as well as their interest in the topic at hand. 

For secondary students, homework is useful as a "short and focused intervention .” That means something like a research project that you complete at home. 💻

For primary students, homework can help reinforce skills students are learning in school. It makes sense to practice spelling words at home or working on reading skills , for example. 

How does homework promote learning?

One way homework can promote learning is by giving older students a chance to read more content than can be covered in class. For example, a Literature student might read a couple of chapters of a novel at home and then spend the class time discussing its themes with peers. This saves classroom time for the part of learning that’s done with other students.

Research shows that the best homework is closely linked to what you’re learning in the classroom. It should expand your learning and always be something you can complete independently. ✔️

It goes without saying that homework takes time. The more homework you have, the less time you can spend outside or relax. 

Homework leaves less time for creative activities that are also very important for brain growth. 🧠

Studies show very little difference in test scores between students who spend lots of time on homework and students who do less homework. For primary school students especially, not many benefits have been found. 

So, should students have homework?

In an ideal world, primary students would not have homework. And secondary students would only have short-term homework assignments with a very specific goal, like a book report or a science project. 

Since students often do have homework, it shouldn’t take much time - the benefits are the same for a few minutes and a few hours of homework!

Stress-free homework tips 

At the end of the day, there may be very little you can do right away about your homework situation. If your teacher assigns it, it must get done – but here are a few tips to make it less stressful:

  • It’s a great idea for you to be independent with planning and managing your work time rather than being hounded into starting your homework by your parents. As you get older, it’s up to you to manage yourself – maybe you’d prefer to divide the work up into manageable chunks, for example tackling one subject before dinner and another one after.
  • You should have a distraction-free space to work at home. Turn off the television, and keep electronics out of sight to make it easier to stay focused.
  • If you’ve had a long school day, it’s a great idea to take some free time after school before starting your homework. You may need a chance to relax and regroup before jumping right into homework. 
  • If you find yourself struggling with your workload, you should have a chat with your teacher or speak to your parents about it. Homework should closely follow the in-class learning and shouldn’t take more than an hour.

Homework help with GoStudent

If you’re struggling to manage your homework, a GoStudent tutor can help. Our experienced, friendly tutors have a deep understanding of the content they teach, and your tutor can give you the one-on-one support you need to get back on track and be able to finish that homework in no time! 🚀

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Is Homework a Waste of Students’ Time? Study Finds It’s the Biggest Cause of Teen Stress

It’s the bane of every teen’s existence. After sitting through hours at school, they leave only to get started on mountains of homework. And educators are mixed on its effectiveness . Some say the practice reinforces what students learned during the day, while others argue that it put unnecessary stress on kids and parents , who are often stuck nagging or helping.

According to a new study, conducted by the Better Sleep Council , that homework stress is the biggest source of frustration for teens, with 74 percent of those surveyed ranking it the highest, above self-esteem (51 percent) parental expectations (45 percent) and bullying (15 percent).

Homework is taking up a large chunk of their time , too — around 15-plus hours a week, with about one-third of teens reporting that it’s closer to 20-plus hours.

The stress and excessive homework adds up to lost sleep , the BSC says. According to the survey, 57 percent of teenagers said that they don’t get enough sleep, with 67 reporting that they get just five to seven hours a night — a far cry from the recommended eight to ten hours. The BSC says that their research shows that when teens feel more stressed, their sleep suffers. They go to sleep later, wake up earlier and have more trouble falling and staying asleep than less-stressed teens.

“We’re finding that teenagers are experiencing this cycle where they sacrifice their sleep to spend extra time on homework, which gives them more stress — but they don’t get better grades,” said Mary Helen Rogers, the vice president of marketing and communications for the BSC.

RELATED VIDEO: To Help Or Not To Help: Moms Talk About Whether Or Not They Help Their Children With Homework

Another interesting finding from this study: students who go to bed earlier and wake up earlier do better academically than those who stay up late, even if those night owls are spending that time doing homework.

To end this cycle of sleep deprivation and stress, the BSC recommends that students try setting a consistent time to go to sleep each night, regardless of leftover homework. And their other sleep tips are good for anyone, regardless of age — keep the temperature between 65 and 67 degrees, turn off the electronic devices before bed, make sure the mattress is comfy and reduce noise with earplugs or sound machines.

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The great homework debate - good idea or waste of time?

Is homework essential for developing good study habits and reinforcing classroom learning.

why are homework a waste of time

The homework debate: Children who are managing at school find homework repetitive and children who are struggling at school find it reinforces the fact that they are struggling. Photograph: iStockphoto

Sheila Wayman's face

Is homework essential for developing good study habits and reinforcing classroom learning? Or is it a waste of time and an educational turn-off?

One thing that’s certain is that homework causes a lot of grief in many households. And when US “homework guru” Harris Cooper of Duke University said “there is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary (aged 4-11) students”, parents might well wonder why they’re battling with their primary school children over it.

“Children who are managing at school find it repetitive and children who are struggling at school find it reinforces the fact that they are struggling,” says Áine Lynch, chief executive of the National Parents’ Council (NPC) – Primary. “You then start to wonder about the purpose.”

There’s no doubt about the importance of the home-learning environment for children’s education but battling over homework makes that a very negative place, she says. However, it’s too simplistic to suggest that all homework is “bad”, it depends on what it is.

“When we talk about homework, we talk about this thing that is not defined,” says Lynch. Homework reteaching something that was done in the class that day is one kind of homework. If you are talking about homework where children go home and put Irish name labels on things around the house, that’s a completely different thing.

“One of the things that homework does do when it’s working well is that it gives that home-school link and makes parents aware of what children are doing,” she says.

What do you think? Parents, teachers and children are being invited to have their say on homework in an online survey being conducted by the National Parents Council - Primary.

It is on the website npc.ie will close at midnight on May 22nd.

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Why Homework Is a Waste of Time

Why do we even need homework? To practice? We do that enough already.  Homework is a waste of time. It takes the enjoyment out of school and it takes up teacher time. Students need more free time for other activities such as sports, homework takes it away from spending time with family and friends.

     Is homework a waste of time ? The study of 18,000 schoolchildren finds no relationship between working hard at home and better grades. More  homework assignments  didn’t translate into better grades. Next time you hear a child complaining that their science and math homeworks are wastes of time they might have a point. Young children spend enough of their day at school. When they come home, they should be free to dump the school bag and get busy doing non academic stuff such as getting a job and starting on something to pursue their career.

        Students need more free time for other activities. Education isn’t the only important activity in everyone’s life. We all need some time to ourselves to prevent stress or blow off from some steam. It can damage family relationships and stresses parents out as well  as their children. School takes up a lot of time that children can be using to do something more productive.

         

Homework takes up teacher time. Teachers would have more time if they didn’t assign homework.  The teacher  needs to design the homework, explain it , mark each piece individually and tell everyone if they got it right or wrong. Teachers could as easily use the classwork to find out who knows what they are doing. We aren’t the only ones who take a lot of time on homework, our teachers do as well. Homework loses it’s value because we need to be told individually what our mistakes are.

It takes the enjoyment out of school. We would enjoy school more if we didn’t have any homework. When we only get homework occcassionally we will consider that piece more important. Especially if we get too much homework it can take the enjoyment out of learning. No matter how engaging the teacher is in class , homework will almost certainly  be stressful , boring and tiring. We know that there is no direct link between how much homework is set and grades.             

Some people believe that homework isn't a waste of time. You have to try your best to do the homework that's given to you. Millions of people work for themselves or work from home. The main aim of education is to prepare us for the rest of their lives. Homework is teaching us a key skill that we will need in the future . When we do homework we are learning on our own.                 Homework is a responsibility. We should expect to get a certain amount of homework per day. Homework aids class work by providing a space for those who haven't finished the work. Teachers will need to mark and go through work whether it's classwork or homework . Whether homework puts us off learning will always depend on what the homework we are given is.            

This paragraph presents that homework is a responsibility for high school kids and students. The importance of this argument is that homework takes away time from spending it with family and friends.  The reader should take homework away from this because it's it takes a long time to do and it's a waste of time.

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Boy doing homework

Is homework a waste of time for primary school children?

Do primary school children really need to do homework? Not according to a motion being debated by teachers today.

Calling for its abolition for this age group, the motion at the Association of Teachers and Lecturers conference in Liverpool states that, "homework in the primary school is a waste of children's and teachers' time, which could be spent much more profitably on effective learning both in and out of the classroom".

This would pit teachers against the government which lays down homework guidelines for schools – primaries as well as secondaries. These demand a clear policy statement, developed in consultation with the pupils, staff, parents and governors. "The foundations of effective homework practices are established early on and develop progressively across the key stages – effective homework practices can also be used to support effective transitionary links to the secondary phase," states the Department for Children Schools and Families.

It adds that parents and carers must play their part, "helping their children at home, monitoring homework, providing encouragement, and even assisting with the marking of homework".

Reading the guidelines you would have to guess that a review of the research evidence commissioned by the schools inspectorate, Ofsted, concluded that the case for homework in primary schools was "inconclusive" . Fewer studies have been carried out at primary level and results have been inconsistent, said the National Foundation for Educational Research.

The study notes drily: "The suggestion that setting homework for primary-age pupils instills positive attitudes towards studying has received very little attention in the research literature." In other words, ministers are conducting an experiment with our children.

So, is homework a waste of time for younger children?

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Is Homework A Waste of Time?

You just had what seemed like the longest day of your life. You walk into your room after a rough day of classes. You took two tests that you didn’t do so hot on and you are exhausted. All you want to do is relax for a little bit, but you can’t. Why? Because tomorrow you have 40 math problems due, a paper to write for your English class, and a speech outline due for your public speaking class.

aaaa

So the question is, is all the homework really worth it? Is there any evidence that homework leads to a stronger academic student? Let’s take a look.

According to  District Administration , there is a positive correlation between homework and better scores on tests. When interviewed, researcher Robert Tai said, “Homework should act as a place where students practice the skills they’ve learned in class. It shouldn’t be a situation where students spend many hours every night poring over something new.” A study was done by Harris Cooper in 2006 (director of  Duke University’s Program in Education ). He analyzed and combined the results many homework studies. He found that students who had homework performed better on class tests compared to those who did not.

On the other hand, there are many studies that suggest otherwise. Some studies conclude that homework does not impact achievement significantly. In fact, some believe it has the opposite effect.  One study from Penn State  looked data from the late 1990s. They found that in countries that give more homework, student’s performance on the international test,  Trends in Mathematics and Science Study , was lower than those with less homework. These professors and researchers do not call for no homework necessarily, but they do suggest making homework more about the quality than quantity

homework

Homework is helpful. Practice problems do in fact improve test grades and guide students in succeeding in the classroom. However, after about 90 minutes of homework, results will start to diminish. It’s important to find the happy-medium when it comes to homework and make sure students aren’t overloaded with busy work.

So next time you walk through your door after a stressful day of class, club meetings, and work, just remember that a few minutes hitting the book will benefit you in the long run. But after 90-120 minutes it may be time to put the pencil down, close your laptop, and call it a night.

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Homework is a Waste of Time

Ava+Obrock%2C+Olivia+Stults%2C+Viviana+Buzzelli%2C+and+Caitlyn+Blasch+work+on+homework+during+the+school+day.+

Nailah Spencer

Ava Obrock, Olivia Stults, Viviana Buzzelli, and Caitlyn Blasch work on homework during the school day.

Nailah Spencer , Reporter October 26, 2018

Kids at West Middle School say Homework is a waste of time! Did you know that West Middle School does not require teachers to give out homework to students? “Teachers give out homework according to how they feel about a student or a class’s learning process,” Mr. Smiley told me. I did some research, interviews, and additional thinking to see how some of the students and staff feel about homework.

”I strongly dislike homework because it stresses me out. We go to school to for many hours a day to learn, I don’t get why we have to go home and spend 1-2 more hours on homework,” Hannah Comar, a 7th grader at West, explained to me.

According to the Drop Out Prevention Center (D.O.P.C.),  “32.1% of students from 8th grade through high school drop out each year because they can’t keep up with all their homework assignments.” This research was done in the United States. 

Mrs. O’dell, a sixth-grade teacher at West, explained to me,  “I have over the years seen behavior changes with students.”

Academic Partnerships states,  “When kids know they will have to go home from school and work to do more work at home they become disengaged and don’t come to school the next day ready to pay attention and are usually talkative and disruptive for no time to themselves after school”. Mrs. O’Dell states, “Yes,  have seen students overwhelmed with work, but behavior changes, not so much. Mostly just [students’] grades dropping.”

Mrs. Odell reflects, “I give it out so I can see the students’ progress, it also builds on good habits, like time management and organizational skills.”

Mrs. Horvath’s Journalism states that they can have anywhere from 20 minutes to two hours of homework a night between all their classes.

Free time to yourself is essential, whether it is for sports or just time with your family. Free time gives you a chance to refresh and get ready for the new day to come.

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Richard Cao • Jul 3, 2021 at 12:29 pm

I think Homework should be abolished in schools. Students already have a difficult time in school so giving more work at home would just stress out even more. Students should have time to spend with their family and friends, while also learning essential skills such as cooking, cleaning, and getting plenty of cardio exercise. Also it would benefit teachers because they would have less things to grade.

bababoi • Dec 8, 2020 at 11:05 am

Desi • Mar 30, 2020 at 7:41 pm

Homework is a waste when we go to school for several hours a day all for what so we could go home and do even more work instead of relaxing many kids drop out because of how much time they wasted on doing stressful meaningless work

joey • Dec 19, 2018 at 12:40 pm

I do agree that homework is a waste of time because we work all day and then we get homework so we have to work at home too.

Joey • Dec 19, 2018 at 12:39 pm

homework doesn’t do anything I just forget everything that teachers give homework on quicker then usual.

Jacob • Nov 20, 2018 at 12:49 pm

Homework is useless because kids spend almost half their at school then having to worry about homework once they get home its to much pressure for kids our age, high schools should be the grade when homework starts and we know homework is supposed to prove what we learn but we don’t learn anything from test nor homework we just memorise it, do it, then we forget everything we learned because you have to then memorize other things and forget others. And that is why I think homework is a waste of time.

The truth talker • Nov 20, 2018 at 12:44 pm

Homework is too stressful, and is too time-consuming.

Jacob Mdelski • Nov 20, 2018 at 12:44 pm

Homework can be good for us but it can just be too much for some students to handle.

finn st john • Nov 15, 2018 at 8:16 am

homework is not good. we are at school for 7 hours and some of us stay at club (after school thing) till 4 5 or even 6! homework is just what we were doing that day all over again but at home.

the derp • Nov 2, 2018 at 12:53 pm

homework helps us but can sometimes be a waste of time

Ryan M • Nov 2, 2018 at 12:47 pm

Homework is like telling a dog never to play or lick your face again

Madisyn Hackett • Nov 2, 2018 at 12:42 pm

Homework is very stressful!

Dillon Starnes • Oct 31, 2018 at 12:12 pm

This is an excellent article, Nailah!

Kyle Dani • Oct 31, 2018 at 12:10 pm

This is a great article. I agree that teachers hand out way to much homework.

Hannah Comar • Oct 31, 2018 at 12:03 pm

I agree with this considering I was one of the interviewees. Great article Nailah!

Maddie Andrews • Oct 31, 2018 at 11:59 am

I like your picture and I agree, homework is very stressful!

Maddie Andrews • Oct 31, 2018 at 11:57 am

I like your picture! I agree homework can be very stressful!

Caitlin Noe • Oct 31, 2018 at 11:50 am

I like your picture a lot it is very creative and I agree homework is just a recap of what we learned.

unknown • Oct 29, 2018 at 1:51 pm

homework is ok I always finish it in class so I don’t have homework relly

AAron • Oct 26, 2018 at 12:49 pm

i hate having to do work at home it is a wast of my time

AAron • Oct 26, 2018 at 12:48 pm

i think homework is a wast of time

Bob Ross • Oct 26, 2018 at 12:45 pm

I get it homework is stress full but homework is good for us examples: Homework is like a mini quiz that lets the teachers know if you actually learned something in their class.

Lizzy Gutkowski • Oct 26, 2018 at 12:21 pm

I think homework is too stessful. It makes me have to stay up late and work on my homework.

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Is Homework A Waste of Time? Let’s Find Out!

Is Homework a Waste of Time

Table of Contents

The is homework a waste of time debate, why homework is a waste of time, why is it good to do homework, does homework prevent family time.

So, is homework a waste of time? As a student, you are probably wondering why you need to complete so many school chores every day. The truth is that high school and college students get a lot of homework weekly. In many cases, you need to study during the weekends when you should spend time with your family and friends. And let’s not forget that there are times when you need to spend several nights working on a difficult research paper.

It’s no wonder you consider that homework is a waste of time. Did you know that the is homework a waste of time debate has been going on for years? You are not the only one doubting the efficacy of an education system based on homework. Let’s discuss this in more detail.

The debate about whether homework should be required in schools has been going on for years. There are a lot of homework debate pros and cons. Even teachers and parents have reacted and contributed with their points of view to this debate. And yes, there is even a should homework be banned debate.

In many cases, both teachers and parents have agreed that students get too much homework to do at certain times. The truth of the matter is that some professors don’t care about their students’ workload. They don’t realize that students have to complete various school chores for most of their other classes. It’s no wonder many students end up spending night after night working on their essays and research papers. The homework debate is getting hotter every year.

But how is homework a waste of time? We can’t defend homework entirely, even if we do agree that it is beneficial in some cases. We have to think about why the ban homework debate is so intense. And there are certain things that make homework a waste of time. Here are some of them:

  • According to scientific studies, it looks like people with a high intellectual level tend to procrastinate more. If you don’t do your homework or if you rush it, you usually get a low grade. And a low grade usually suggests an inability to study, therefore a lower intellectual level. As you can see, homework does not accurately reflect a student’s intelligence . This is the main reason why homework is a waste of time.
  • Why do teachers give homework? It’s easier to hand out homework than it is to make sure your students understand the subject matter during class hours. However, a students who didn’t understand much won’t usually be able to complete the homework without some form of help.
  • Some of the assignments are pointless, plain and simple . They simply don’t make sense. They won’t help you in your academic career or in life in any way. This is one of the things that come up frequently in the banning homework debate. It points to the fact that some homework is really a waste of the student’s time.

Now that you know about some of the things that make homework somewhat useless, it’s time to take a look at some of the benefits of homework. Why is it good to do homework? There are plenty of pros to getting some homework (perhaps not as much as you currently receive though). Here are some of them:

  • Organizing your homework time helps you improve your organizational skills . You will learn how to organize your time so that you can finish each assignment on time. You will also have to learn how to split a large assignment into smaller parts and then work on each part in an organized manner. These skills will help you immensely when you get your first job.
  • Why do i have to do my homework? One of the main benefits of doing homework is that you can learn the subject matter a lot faster . It helps you remember important things that you will need to know to take top grades on your future tests.
  • Is homework a waste of time? Sometime it is not. Homework sometimes teaches you how to solve difficult problems in the most efficient manner . Problem solving skills will prove to be very useful in life, as you will surely find out at some point in the future.

But does homework prevent family time? In some cases, yes, homework can interfere with family time. Some students can even go into a depression. Spending night after night working on your homework and not spending enough time with your friends and family can have negative effects on your mental health. This is the reasons why many students ask us the “why can’t i do my homework” question.

At times, homework is useless. We really agree that part of the dreaded homework debate is accurate: students sometimes receive too many school assignments. They are swamped. They are overwhelmed. Even though there are many benefits to doing homework, school chores should not prove to be such an unbearable burden.

The Best Time to Do Homework

How much time should be spent on homework each night? We hear this question a lot lately. The problem is that you shouldn’t even be asking this question. The night is not meant for study. It is meant for rest. The best time to do homework is during the morning (during the weekends, of course). If you have school in the morning, you can work on your homework in the afternoon or even the evening.

What’s the average time spent on homework by grade? There is no set figure, but on average high school students get 10 to 14 hours’ worth of homework every week. College students are often looking at 20+ hours per week. This is quite a lot, so you should consider getting some help from our homework helpers , if you need some assistance with more complex essays and research papers.

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3 Reasons Why Doing Homework is a Waste of Time

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Table of Contents

Not a sign of intelligence, doesn’t make much sense, makes you miss the motivation wave, wrapping up.

Students are often burdened with doing homework assignments that get the better of them and their valuable time. However, it is also possible for these students to use this time instead for doing other productive tasks or even for intended procrastination, which may in-turn help increase productivity. Here’s a viewpoint on why doing homework is a waste of time and how to use this time to better your productivity. ~ Ed. 

Do you know people who always have tons of motivation to do homework ?

I haven’t come across such people. Though there might be a few, I guess majority want to avoid doing homework.

Me too! But it turns out that it`s okay to be a bit lazy. It’s okay not to have motivation for doing homework.

Let me bring it down real quick. It is okay to have zero desire to do homework and to procrastinate for hours instead of being all energetic and productive.

No, it doesn’t mean that you’re lazy or foolish; this phenomenon has many explanations. But the thing you’ve got to remember for sure is that it is fine if you can’t catch up with the A-students.

First and foremost, you’ve got to face reality here. How important are the grades for you?

If you want to receive a grand to get a master’s degree in another country, then, of course, grades are important. When all you need is a diploma which you will proudly hand over to your mom and never use it again, then you have the right to dedicate some time to procrastination .

Don’t you dare to think that I’m trying to lure you into the world of drop-outs and couch potatoes? I only want you to learn how to set your priorities right.

Success in life cannot be determined by the number of essays that you wrote at the university. You may not even write them at all. The simplest way to avoid all that stress is by addressing a good homework doer service.

I’m going to calm down your stressed out nervous system and conscience, and tell you why you shouldn’t be all anxious about having zero motivation to do homework.

But before we do that, please note that such an emotional state when you have little desire to do anything, not just your homework, may be a sign of such serious mental condition as clinical depression. So, please be careful with that and never hesitate to ask for professional help.

Okay, so as per my thoughts, here are the three main reasons why doing homework is a waste of time:

As I’ve mentioned above, a state of procrastination doesn’t necessarily point out to your inability to study.

A scientific study reports that people who have a higher intellectual level tend to procrastinate more . Just don’t perceive this information as an excuse for your social media addiction, it doesn’t work this way. How is that even related?

It’s believed that very smart people are thinking all the time, even without realizing it. They have very active brain activity, and they may even try to solve the world issues on the subconscious level.

The moments of procrastination are highly important for people of this type. It gives their brains a chance to cool off and relax a little bit. Because, yes, our brain does get tired from time to time, and it can switch off your concentration and attention when it feels like having a little rest so that you can go on with all the thinking processes.

No matter how much you love studying, and no matter how great your university is, still there is no way of avoiding some absurd and senseless assignments. You have no idea why you would do this or why such a huge piece of work is assessed with so few points.

Your logic isn’t as dead as you may think. It’s still somewhere in there, and it can give you a hint that you really shouldn’t do this task because it’s nothing but a complete waste of time. Of course, you lose any kind of motivation with such assignment.

Don’t worry. Just think whether this homework will have a big impact on your final score and then make a decision.

One of the biggest mistakes that you can do while feeling all down and unmotivated is looking at other people, who seem extremely productive and compare your pitiful self to those walking energizers.

We all may feel that way from time to time – mainly because our powers aren’t infinite. We get tired and worn out. So, just stop sobbing and go out for a walk. You’ll be surprised how inspirational one single stroll around the town can be. Your demotivation just a phase, and you’ve got to get over it.

And while you’re still in the moment when you can get nothing done, make a list of activities and tasks that you need to finish.

Then you have to learn how to be a surfboarder. No need to buy a ticket to Australia, you just need to learn how to catch the waves. One “wave of motivation,” to be precise.

Have you noticed that sometimes the feeling of productivity and endless energy rushes through your veins, and you just get everything done in no time?

Congrats, you`re just an average human being. You need to learn how to spot those moments of motivation and get as much work done as it’s humanly possible.

And when you have a day or two of no motivation at all, you won’t feel so frustrated because you know for sure that the productivity will eventually come back.

Doing homework is not a sign of intelligence. It’s okay to procrastinate at times if it helps you relax and solve bigger issues.

If you think your homework doesn’t make much sense or it’s not worth spending your valuable time that you can use elsewhere for more worthy tasks, then you may think of using any homework services.

Missing out on the homework may give you the opportunity not to miss the motivation wave that can help you become more productive .

Over to you –

Have you ever felt that doing homework is a waste of time? Share in the comments.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are entirely of the author.

Disclaimer: Though the views expressed are of the author’s own, this article has been checked for its authenticity of information and resource links provided for a better and deeper understanding of the subject matter. However, you're suggested to make your diligent research and consult subject experts to decide what is best for you. If you spot any factual errors, spelling, or grammatical mistakes in the article, please report at [email protected] . Thanks.

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College was too stressful and expensive for me. But I loved grad school because it was free and incredibly fulfilling.

  • I never liked undergrad because I was constantly stressed about paying my tuition and student loans.
  • But grad school was different, and it was free. 
  • Grad school also allowed me more freedom and a better social life.

Insider Today

Parties with the iconic red cups, big tailgates, and no cares in the world: this is how college is often depicted in movies. While my college experience included these moments, those aspects were only a small fraction of my college experience . 

Despite loving school, I didn’t particularly enjoy my time in college. A large part of that was the financial implications. Since I had taken out student loans, I felt a lot of anxiety about the cost of college .

If I could do it again, I would have worried about money less and branched out more instead of rushing to get my degree. But my reality was that college meant a lot of work — inside and outside the classroom. I worked various jobs, including in fast food, to support myself. I spent a lot of solitary nights in the library studying. I was homesick , and I hated the bureaucracy around required classes.

Because of my less-than-stellar college experience, I wasn’t expecting much from graduate school , which I attended about five years after receiving my Bachelor’s degree. But I found that graduate school was incredibly fulfilling. 

Graduate school let me narrow in on one specific passion

Graduate school had a specific focus, which allowed me to hone in on my interests. My focus was creative writing, specifically poetry. 

I was able to do exactly what I wanted and concentrate on my craft. The classwork and homework felt purposeful. Each assignment was an exercise that would bring me closer to a thesis that I could be proud of and that could ultimately be transformed into a book for the next stage of my career. 

My program was fully funded, so money wasn’t as much of a concern

My graduate program was small, and because of that, it offered full funding for students who were residents of the state, which I was. Lifting this financial burden allowed me to fully enjoy my time without worrying about the cost. 

The program was also designed with professionals in mind, and the classes began in the evening. This allowed me to keep my full-time job and attend school at night. My graduate school program also allowed me to teach a college course to undergraduate students . This opportunity, which was paid, reaffirmed my desire to work as an educator in some capacity throughout my career.  

While college had me burning the candle at both ends, graduate school allowed me to be more intentional with my time. Instead of working several minimum wage jobs at once, like I did in college, I had a much more regular schedule. 

Though I was still busy, my schedule gave me a lot of time to socialize 

Graduate school actually gave me more time with friends. Though the stereotype is that college is all about partying, it was only in graduate school that I really got to enjoy hanging out with friends since my life had more structure, and I carefully planned my free time.

My obligations were more predictable, allowing me to build a more robust social life . 

Plus, since I had common ground with my cohort, we could do things inside and outside the classroom together, like go to poetry readings, which were part of our syllabus.

Ultimately, even though some things were unexpected, I wouldn’t change my experience

I graduated with my Master’s degree in 2020, so the pandemic impacted the last semester. While I couldn’t wait to finish college at the time, I was very sad that graduate school was over, and it was difficult to process the end, especially during that uncertain period. 

The differences in my undergraduate and graduate experiences showed me how vastly dissimilar expectations and reality truly can be — and it reaffirmed why it’s important to keep an open mind. 

Graduate school ended up being better than I could have imagined because of various unexpected pluses, and I’ll always think fondly of that period.

why are homework a waste of time

Watch: JAMES ALTUCHER: College is a waste of time and money

why are homework a waste of time

  • Main content

Homework is a waste of time. (Junior)

Homework is a waste of time. (Junior)

We all hate homework, but is it really important that we do it? Is doing homework good for us or is it simply a waste of time? This debate sets out the arguments on both sides.

Homework is an assignment that students are given to do at home. It might be a continuation of classwork or a new piece of work. It may also be preparation for the next class. The amount of homework school students get varies a lot not only from country to country, or from school to school, but often from day to day. For most the amount of time spent on homework gets longer as we go through our school lives. At the start of primary school we get almost no homework but it is often several hours a day by the time we finish secondary school.

The most important thing in this debate is not so much how much time is spent on homework but whether that time is wasted. If it is time well spent then having a lot of homework to do may not be a bad thing. The debate should therefore consider what else school children would do with that time. Another angle would be to look at whether school could replace homework with something that makes better use of time. For example in Britain the education secretary (the member of the government who controls education across the whole country) wants schools to scrap homework and instead have longer days in school. 

When out of school we should have time to ourselves

Time is valuable. We all need some time to ourselves. School already takes up a lot of time and it is necessary to have time which does not involve concentrating on learning. Education is not the only important activity in everyone’s day; physical activity, play, and time with family are just as important as all teach life skills just in different ways. The internet makes it possible to be learning at home, there are even many computer games that help with learning. Homework clashes with these other activities. It can damage family relationships as it means parents have to try and make their children do their homework.

We should expect to get a certain amount of homework per day and build other activities around the homework. Homework can be a useful part of time with family as it provides a chance for parents and other relatives to take part in schooling. 

Homework takes up class time

Homework does not only take up time doing the homework at home but also takes up time in class. First there is the time that the teacher takes when explaining the task. Then more time is taken going through the homework when it is done and marked. This time could be better spent engaging with the class to find out what they do and don’t understand. The answer to this is to have more time in class rather than boring homework.

When homework does take up time in class it is helpful for learning. And when it does not then it does not harm the classwork. Homework aids classwork by providing a space for those who have not finished the work to catch up and by helping us to remember what we did in class.

Homework wastes teachers time

We are not the only ones who take a lot of time on homework, our teachers do as well. The teacher needs to design the homework, explain it, mark each piece individually, and tell everyone what they got right and wrong. If all this is not done then the homework loses its value as we need to be told individually what our mistakes are to be able to learn from homework. Teachers could as easily use the classwork to find out who knows what they are doing and who are making mistakes and it would save them time.

Teachers will need to mark and go through work whether it is classwork or homework. It is better that the teacher should spend their time in class teaching so leaving practising the methods taught to homework. 

Homework puts students off learning

Especially if we get too much homework it can take the enjoyment out of learning. No matter how engaging the teacher is in class homework will almost certainly be stressful, boring and tiring. It is simply much harder to make homework engaging and interesting as it is often done on our own. We know that there is no direct link between how much homework is set and grades. Studies done on this come to different conclusions so teachers should only set homework when they are sure it is needed. When we only get homework occasionally we will consider that piece more important and a better use of time. 

Whether homework puts us off learning will always depend on what the homework we are given is. Tasks that involve no interaction, or are not engaging will discourage learning. But homework could also mean reading an interesting book, having to find something out, create something, or doing a task with family. Homework can be as varied as classwork and just as interesting.

Points Against

Homework teaches us to learn on our own.

The main aim of education is to prepare us for the rest of lives. Homework is teaching us a key skill that we will need in the future. When we do homework we are learning to work on our own, the discipline to get the work done without the teacher’s prompting, and when we come up against difficulties we learn how to overcome them without our teacher’s help. Millions of people work for themselves (self-employed), or work from home, they are using exactly the same skills doing homework teaches us. This is not a waste of time. 

Most homework is simply fulfilling a task that has already been explained so not truly teaching you to work on your own. Working on your own means setting your own targets, and working out how to overcome obstacles. 

Doing our homework means we are taking responsibility for ourselves

We are the ones who gain from learning so we should take responsibility for some of our own learning. We can take responsibility by doing homework. When we don’t do our homework we are the ones who suffer; we don’t get good marks and don’t learn as much. We also lose out in other ways as taking responsibility means learning how to manage our time and how to do the things that are most important first rather than the things we most enjoy like playing. Homework then does not waste time; it is part of managing it.

The same kind of responsibility is given to us no matter the kind of work. When given classwork we are responsible for completing it rather than playing around. The only difference at home is that it is our parents telling us to work not our teachers.

Homework is needed to finish classwork.

We should think of homework as being a continuation of our classwork. Not everyone in the class works at the same rate so it is necessary for teachers to give anyone who is falling behind the chance to catch up. If this was done in class those who are faster would have nothing to do during this time, which would be a real waste of time. Homework then allows those who are behind to take as long as they need to catch up with the rest of the class.

Teachers should not set classwork expecting that the class will have to finish that classwork as homework. Students who are falling behind should receive more attention from the teacher during class to make sure that all the members of the class can move at the same speed.

Homework makes sure we remember what we have learnt

One way we learn is by repetition, another is by doing things, when doing homework we learn in both of these ways. When we are taught a method at school, such as how to do a type of sum, then we need to practice using that method to make sure we know how to so that we can remember it. If we just learn the method and don’t practice it we will soon forget how we do it.

We don’t spend all of class time learning new methods so there should be time in class to practice any new method that is taught. Once some repetition has been done in class how much more do we really need at home? If we have not successfully learnt the method in the class then we will be simply repeating the mistake.

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Why is free time still so elusive?

why are homework a waste of time

Distinguished Professor of Modern History, Penn State

Disclosure statement

Gary Cross does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Penn State provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation US.

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There have been massive gains in productivity over the past century.

So why are people still working so hard for so long?

Output per worker increased by almost 300% between 1950 and 2018 in the U.S. The standard American workweek, meanwhile, has remained unchanged, at about 40 hours.

This paradox is especially notable in the U.S., where the average work year is 1,767 hours compared with 1,354 in Germany , a difference largely due to Americans’ lack of vacation time .

Some might argue that Americans are just more hardworking. But shouldn’t more productive work be rewarded with more time free from work?

This is the central theme of my new book, “ Free Time: The History of an Elusive Ideal .”

Keynes misses the mark

Many economists see the status quo mostly as a choice : People would simply rather have more money. So they prioritize work over free time.

However, in the past, many economists assumed that people’s need for more stuff would eventually be met. At that point, they would choose more free time.

In fact, one of the most famous economists of the 20th century, John Maynard Keynes, confidently predicted in 1930 that within a century, the normal workweek would decrease to 15 hours. Yet Americans in their prime working age are still on the job 41.7 hours per week.

Man with white mustache and thinning hair sits for a portrait.

Why was Keynes wrong?

Obviously, people’s needs or wants were not fully met. In the first half of the 20th century, advertising shifted in ways that emphasized emotions over utility, making consumers feel like they needed to buy more stuff; planned obsolescence shortened how long products remained functional or fashionable, spurring more frequent purchases; and new, exciting – but costly – goods and services kept consumerism churning.

So workers continued to labor for long hours to earn enough money to spend.

Furthermore, as wages rose, the opportunity cost of time spent away from work also grew. This made more free time less economically appealing. In a consumption-saturated society, time spent neither producing nor consuming goods increasingly appeared as wasted time.

Interest in slower, cheaper activities – reading a book, meeting a friend to catch up over coffee – started to seem less important than buying a pickup truck or spending an hour at the casino, pursuits that demand disposable income.

Forced labor

It’s still important to consider whether there’s even any choice to be made.

Almost everyone who works 40 hours a week or more does so because they have to. There are bills to pay, health insurance coverage to maintain and retirement to squirrel away money for. Some jobs are more precarious than others, and many workers even forego earned vacation time for fear of losing promotions .

This hardly makes for a free choice.

But the 40-hour week isn’t the result of a personal calculation of costs and benefits. Rather, it’s the result of a hard-fought political battle that culminated in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 , which established the standard 40-hour workweek, along with a minimum wage.

Pressed by a labor movement that was far more powerful than today’s , the government implemented a range of progressive economic policies during the 1930s to help the nation emerge from the Great Depression.

Many government officials viewed setting a standard workweek as a way to curtail exploitation and unfair competition among employers, who would otherwise be motivated to push their employees to work for as long as possible. It was an emergency measure, not a choice of more time over more personal income. Nor was it a step toward the progressive reduction of hours worked, as Keynes had envisioned.

In fact, it was hardly a radical measure.

Labor leaders had initially proposed a 30-hour week, which government officials resoundingly rejected. Even New Deal liberals saw a shortening of working hours as a potential threat to economic growth .

So the 40-hour week ended up as the compromise, and the standard hasn’t been updated since.

Young women raise their fists and smile. Two of them hold a sign reading 'SIT-DOWN STRIKE - HELP US WIN 40 HOUR WEEK.'

For most Americans, this was an acceptable trade-off. They might be working long hours, but they could afford television sets, cars and homes in the suburbs. Many families could live on the wages of the full-time work of the father, making the 40-hour week seem reasonable, since the mother had time to care for the family and home.

But this consensus has long since been undermined. Since the 1970s, inflation-adjusted wages haven’t risen with economic growth . In many households that include married or partnered couples, a single wage earner has been replaced by two earners, both of whom find themselves working at least 40 hours per week.

It’s almost as if the 40-hour week has been replaced by an 80-hour week – at least in terms of hours worked per household .

Who has time to raise kids? Who can afford them? It’s no wonder the birth rate has declined .

Separating economic growth from well-being

For decades, the amount of work we do has been talked about as “just the way things are” – an inevitability, almost. It doesn’t seem possible for society to take a different tack and, like flipping a switch, work less.

To me, this resignation points to a need to reconsider the social contracts of the past. Most Americans will not abandon their work ethic and their insistence that most people work. Fair enough.

Many people prefer working over having vast stores of free time, and that’s OK. And there’s still immense value in work that doesn’t produce a paycheck – caregiving and volunteering, for example.

But reducing the standard workweek, perhaps by transitioning to a four-day week, could ease stress for overworked families.

These changes require political action, not just individuals making the personal choice to arrive at a better work-life balance. And yet a national reduction in the standard workweek seems almost impossible. Congress can’t even pass legislation for paid family leave or guaranteed vacation time.

It doesn’t help that elected leaders continue to insist that well-being be measured mostly by economic growth, and when the U.S. media breathlessly reports quarterly economic growth data, with increases deemed “good” and decreases deemed “bad.”

Why shouldn’t free time and its benefits be included in the equation? Why aren’t figures on the social costs of unlimited growth publicized? Does it even matter that the Dow Jones Industrial Average has doubled in less than a decade when economic security is so fragile and so many people are overstressed ?

The idea that stratospheric increases in productivity can allow for more time for life is not simply a romantic or sentimental idea. Keynes viewed it as entirely reasonable.

Opportunities like the one that led to the 40-hour workweek in the 1930s rarely appear. But some sort of paradigm shift is urgently needed.

Something has to give.

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why are homework a waste of time

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why are homework a waste of time

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why are homework a waste of time

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why are homework a waste of time

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South Jersey school district moving forward with controversial Chromebook policy

The board says it hopes to discourage screen time and promote successful time management.

6abc Digital Staff Image

DEPTFORD, New Jersey (WPVI) -- The Deptford Township School District is moving forward with its controversial Chromebook policy.

However, the district is making adjustments to when the Chromebooks will be turned off.

(The video in the player above is from previous coverage on this story.)

Starting March 1, they will be inactive starting at 9 p.m. for elementary students, 10 p.m. for middle schoolers, and 11:30 p.m. for high schoolers.

The devices will all turn back on at 6 a.m. the next day.

READ MORE: New Jersey school district looking to crack down on Chromebook use

The district shared several responses from the community over the policy, including concerns about the amount of homework, along with after school commitments that could impact usage on the Chromebook.

"We surveyed our staff, and according to these results, we believe the homework expectations are quite reasonable," Superintendent Kevin Kanauss said in a statement.

"Please keep in mind we have a morning PLP/enrichment period daily to work on assignments. While some believe schools should not dictate the terms of access to these devices, the reality is that by providing this tool, we are liable for how it's used-not only in a legal sense, but in an educational and ethical sense as well," the statement continued.

Some students have reportedly used the device to chat with other classmates in the middle of the night, according to the district.

Read the full statement from Superintendent Kevin Kanauss below:

"Thank you for your feedback, both in support of and in opposition to our announcement about school Chromebook hours. I'd like to address some of the common responses we received. The top concern was for students with afternoon/evening commitments, such as sports, activities, jobs, and family or faith-based obligations. We certainly understand the need to balance these commitments and fit everything into an increasingly limited amount of time. Concerns were also raised about the amount of homework being assigned. We surveyed our staff, and according to these results, we believe the homework expectations are quite reasonable. Please keep in mind we have a morning PLP/enrichment period daily to work on assignments. While some believe schools should not dictate the terms of access to these devices, the reality is that by providing this tool, we are liable for how it's used-not only in a legal sense, but in an educational and ethical sense as well. Access to non-educational platforms is already blocked on these devices. We are more concerned with students using legitimate tools in unintended ways. For example, several students use Google Docs to chat with each other in the middle of the night. To put it directly, we are not in the business of assigning bedtimes or dictating household rules; however, we absolutely do have a duty to ensure the tools we hand out are used as intended. With all that said, we recognize the need for some students to work later into the evening as they get older and take on more extracurricular and life responsibilities. Therefore, we have adjusted the times to account for this reality. Chromebook inactive hours, beginning March 1, will be: Elementary: 9pm-6am Middle School: 10pm-6am High School: 11:30pm-6am Thank you again for your feedback and your investment in the success of our Spartans."

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Merriam-Webster says you can end a sentence with a preposition. The internet goes off

Emma Bowman, photographed for NPR, 27 July 2019, in Washington DC.

Emma Bowman

why are homework a waste of time

The idea that sentences can end with a preposition has become a point of contention in the replies to a tongue-in-cheek social media post from dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

The idea that sentences can end with a preposition has become a point of contention in the replies to a tongue-in-cheek social media post from dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster.

An authority on the English language has set us free from the tethers of what many have long regarded as a grammatical no-no. Or has it?

The answer depends on how you side with a declaration from Merriam-Webster:

"It is permissible in English for a preposition to be what you end a sentence with," the dictionary publisher said in a post shared on Instagram last week. "The idea that it should be avoided came from writers who were trying to align the language with Latin, but there is no reason to suggest ending a sentence with a preposition is wrong."

Merriam-Webster had touched on a stubborn taboo — the practice of ending sentences with prepositions such as to, with, about, upon, for or of — that was drilled into many of us in grade school. The post ignited an emphatic debate in the comment section.

Many were adamant that a concluding preposition is lazy, or just sounded plain weird.

"Maybe so, but it doesn't sound expressive and at times sounds like someone isn't intelligent enough to articulate themselves," one user replied to Merriam-Webster.

Others heartily welcomed the permission granted.

"Thank you. How many times have I made an awkward sentence to avoid a preposition at the end?!?!" another person wrote.

The emotionally charged response to the post doesn't surprise Ellen Jovin, who travels the country with her "grammar table" fielding questions about Oxford commas, apostrophes and other hot-button linguistic topics.

"I spend a lot of time dealing with the Concluding Preposition Opposition Party," she said. "I know that any day that I want to start a fight, all I have to do is say something about this in public."

The 'Grammar Vigilante': Defender Of Truth, Justice And The Grammarian Way

The Two-Way

The 'grammar vigilante': defender of truth, justice and the grammarian way, why do people get so worked up.

Jovin sees concluding preposition opponents as operatives of a sort of sunk cost fallacy . People have invested a lot of time in finding ways to not end clauses and sentences with prepositions. So, when someone comes along and tells you there's no such rule, it's human nature to cling tighter to something that cost so much time and energy.

"I also think that because not ending with prepositions is associated with a more formal style — maybe some of the anger comes from a kind of pricked pomposity," she said. "Maybe sometimes they feel that someone is criticizing a larger style decision that they've made."

As for Jovin, "I end with prepositions and I'm perfectly happy with my life," she said.

The origins of the ending-preposition prohibition

Among grammarians and lexicographers, Merriam-Webster's comments are widely accepted.

It's true that in Romance languages, because they derive from Latin, a structurally sound sentence can't be made with a preposition placed at the end. But English is not a Romance language.

In the FAQ section of the entry for prepositions, Merriam-Webster states : "The people who claim that a terminal preposition is wrong are clinging to an idea born in the 17th century and largely abandoned by grammar and usage experts in the early 20th."

Regardless Of What You Think, 'Irregardless' Is A Word

Regardless Of What You Think, 'Irregardless' Is A Word

It's not the first time the online dictionary has tried to end the prohibition.

In response to a question posed by a user on X (formerly Twitter) in July 2020 that asked for Merriam-Webster editor Ammon Shea's opinion on "the weirdest quirk of English," Shea took aim at the "non-issue" of whether to end a sentence with a preposition, something he said has led to "so much wasted time."

But it's tough to shake a belief that has wended its way through people's minds for more than three centuries.

Merriam-Webster credits 17th century poet John Dryden with popularizing a rule created by grammarian Joshua Poole.

In 1672, according to the publisher, Dryden chastised poet-playwright Ben Jonson for his use of the "preposition in the end of the sentence; a common fault with him." Decades earlier, it said, Poole expressed concern with prepositions being placed in "their naturall order."

"Untold millions of people have suffered in the subsequent years as a result," the Merriam-Webster entry said.

The ending preposition is "permissible" and "not wrong." But is it right?

Even in the cases where an ending preposition sounds odd, it's still grammatical, if not the best stylistic option.

"It's very sentence-specific," said Jovin, who also runs Syntaxis, a New York City-based consultancy that teaches writing skills and email etiquette. "Many sentences where people are avoiding it, they'd be much better off just ending with a preposition."

People who latch on to a nonexistent rule risk limiting their writing and fluency, she added.

How new words get minted

The Indicator from Planet Money

How new words get minted, merriam-webster tells it like it is.

To be clear, dictionary publishers such as Merriam-Webster are not rulemakers nor rulebreakers. They just report how we already speak.

"We tell you how language is used. Our goal is to tell the truth about words," says Peter Sokolowski, a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster who was not responsible for but backs the social media post.

Those following the false belief often don't realize they're breaking their own rule, Jovin says.

"People who say they never end in prepositions are actually mistaken," she says. "If you go and trail around after them with tape recorders, it's not what's happening."

To hammer the point home, Merriam-Webster captioned its controversial post: "That's what we're talking about." Now, does that sound better than: "That's about what we are talking"?

Wendy's announces Uber-like surge pricing model

VIDEO: Wendy’s unveils dynamic pricing model plan

Wendy’s announced it will launch new menu prices that will fluctuate depending on the time of day.

The country’s second-largest burger chain, which has 6,000 restaurant locations, said the change will begin next year.

why are homework a waste of time

Customers could pay $1 more for a sandwich like the Baconator during the lunch rush, for example.

“Historically, companies just set one price that was constant across time. Pricing algorithms allow companies to change prices throughout the day or perhaps even throughout an hour,” Zach Brown, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan, told “Good Morning America.”

MORE: By the Numbers: Surge pricing

Wendy’s CEO Kirk Tanner said the company will spend $20 million on high-tech digital menu boards that can update prices in real time, similar to surge pricing strategies adopted by rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft, airlines and hotels.

“During the busy times, they can obviously increase profits then,” Brown said. “And also, some consumers will want to shift to the less busy times when demand is lower and prices are lower.”

MORE: Wendy's debuts new Cinnabon innovation on the breakfast menu

Wendy’s is already receiving a frosty reaction to the price change announcement with one user on X, formerly known as Twitter, writing , “Surge pricing is just Price Gouging by any other name.”

Wendy’s told ABC News in a statement that its dynamic menu pricing can “be competitive and flexible with pricing, motivate customers to visit and provide them with the food they love at a great value. We will test a number of features that we think will provide an enhanced customer and crew experience.”

Some experts say customers could see more menu pricing changes ahead at other fast food chains, including McDonald’s and Burger King, especially if Wendy’s sees a boost in its bottom line after implementing dynamic pricing.

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Engineer Your Finances

Engineer Your Finances

15 Reasons Why College Is Not a Waste of Time and Money

Posted: February 5, 2024 | Last updated: February 5, 2024

<p>College is a significant investment of time and money, and in recent years, the value of higher education has been a topic of debate. However, there are numerous compelling reasons why college is not a waste. In this listicle, we’ll explore 15 reasons why pursuing a college education can be a wise and fulfilling choice.</p>

College is a significant investment of time and money, and in recent years, the value of higher education has been a topic of debate. However, there are numerous compelling reasons why college is not a waste. In this listicle, we’ll explore 15 reasons why pursuing a college education can be a wise and fulfilling choice.

<ul> <li><strong><a href="https://www.engineeryourfinances.com/frugal-tips-from-the-grandparents-generation-that-still-apply-today/">20 Frugal Tips From the “Grandparents Generation” That Still Apply Today </a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.engineeryourfinances.com/wise-money-saving-purchases-to-consider/">15 Wise Money-Saving Purchases to Consider To Save Money This Year</a></strong></li> </ul>

1. It Can Be Done Affordably

Starting a higher education journey at a community college is a cost-effective approach. Community colleges typically have lower tuition fees, allowing students to complete their first two years of coursework at a lower cost and then transfer to a four-year university, saving money while still earning a valuable degree.

<p>There’s no good reason behind the cost of college textbooks being so high. Paying $150 to $200 for a book is ridiculous no matter what’s in it. And often, this is the cost just for the digital version.</p>

2. It’s a Great Way to Learn and Develop

College provides a unique environment where you can immerse yourself in subjects you are passionate about. This fosters intellectual growth and allows you to explore in-depth issues, expanding your knowledge and horizons.

<p>It’s not as easy as it is in the movies. After you finish your schooling, you may have trouble getting interviews. It can take months even to get an interview for the type of job you need. It takes a lot of work and patience to get a job.</p>

3. Many Jobs Require a College Degree

Many professions require at least a college degree as a minimum qualification. A degree opens up a wider range of career prospects and can be essential for specific job opportunities.

<p>College education involves challenging coursework and thought-provoking discussions. This environment helps develop critical thinking abilities, preparing you to analyze and solve complex problems in the real world.</p>

4. College Teaches Critical Thinking Skills

College education involves challenging coursework and thought-provoking discussions. This environment helps develop critical thinking abilities, preparing you to analyze and solve complex problems in the real world.

<p>The perceived need to have an opinion on every major issue has been noted. While some feel pressured to weigh in, others advocate for the right to reserve judgment until fully informed.</p>

5. It Teaches You How to Collaborate

Collaborative projects and group work in college teach valuable teamwork and interpersonal skills. These skills are highly transferable and are essential in every profession.

<p>Effective communication is a crucial life skill. College courses and interactions with professors and classmates provide opportunities to improve your communication skills, which are valuable personally and professionally.</p>

6. You’ll Learn Communication Skills

Effective communication is a crucial life skill. College courses and interactions with professors and classmates provide opportunities to improve your communication skills, which are valuable personally and professionally.

<p>Make sure your job knows your value; learn about how to ask for a raise and just go for it.</p>

7. College Degrees Usually Equate to Higher Salaries

Statistically, individuals with college degrees tend to earn higher yearly salaries and opportunities for bonuses. This financial benefit justifies the investment in higher education.

<p>College campuses are known for their diversity and inclusivity. Attending college provides opportunities to interact with people from various backgrounds, broadening cultural awareness and fostering tolerance and understanding.</p>

8. Exposure to Different Cultures

College campuses are known for their diversity and inclusivity. Attending college provides opportunities to interact with people from various backgrounds, broadening cultural awareness and fostering tolerance and understanding.

<p>Statistically, college grads earn more over their lifetimes. That’s an average, though. Many people learn a trade or start a business and end up earning more than the average college grad does.</p>

9. College Graduates Earn More in Their Lifetime

Beyond immediate earning potential, college graduates tend to accumulate significantly more wealth over their lifetime. This long-term financial advantage is a compelling reason to pursue higher education.

<p>Higher education goes beyond job qualifications. It encourages the exploration of big ideas, philosophies, and intellectual discussions. This enhances your cognitive abilities and deepens your understanding of the world.</p>

10. Intellectual Growth and Understanding

Higher education goes beyond job qualifications. It encourages the exploration of big ideas, philosophies, and intellectual discussions. This enhances your cognitive abilities and deepens your understanding of the world.

<p>Being the first in your family to attend and complete a degree program can be a generational breakthrough. It sets an example for younger family members, inspiring them to pursue higher education and potentially breaking cycles of limited opportunities.</p>

11. For Some, It’s a Generational Breakthrough

Being the first in your family to attend and complete a degree program can be a generational breakthrough. It sets an example for younger family members, inspiring them to pursue higher education and potentially breaking cycles of limited opportunities.

<p>When billionaires seek out opportunities and plan for the future, they’re not trying to achieve mediocrity. They want the best outcomes and aren’t afraid to work and struggle to get there.</p>

12. A Degree Helps You Advance Faster in Your Career

Having a degree often accelerates career progression. It can open doors to promotions and leadership roles, as many employers value the skills and knowledge acquired through higher education.

<p>Asking for the job directly at the end of an interview might seem too eager and out of step with modern hiring norms. Companies typically have set processes for recruitment, and rushing to the end can be off-putting for them.</p>

13. More Job Opportunities

A college degree broadens your career options. It makes you eligible for a broader range of job opportunities in various industries, increasing your chances of finding a fulfilling career.

<p>Networking isn’t optional, and it isn’t something that you can be finished with. Billionaires are always networking and building relationships. Relationships are essential to a successful business.</p>

14. Network Building

College provides an excellent platform to build a professional network. Your connections with professors, classmates, and alumni can be invaluable for future career opportunities, collaborations, and mentorship.

<p>Turn your expertise in a subject or field into extra income as a teacher at a community college. Sometimes you need a master’s degree for this, but there are a lot of cases where a bachelor’s and relevant experience are sufficient.</p>

15. Personal Growth and Accomplishment

Completing a degree is a significant personal achievement. College offers a journey of personal growth, self-discovery, and accomplishment that extends beyond the classroom. It instills a sense of pride and self-confidence in graduates.

<p>Many people who grew up poor don’t exactly want to display this information for the world to see. However, it can come out in a wide range of behaviors that make it obvious that the person grew up lower class or in poverty.</p> <p>Many people have habits that they picked up during those years that they haven’t let go of yet.</p>

  • 15 Behaviors That Are a Dead Giveaways Someone Grew up Poor 
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IMAGES

  1. The truth about homework and why it might be a complete waste of time

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  2. Homework: A Waste of Time

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  3. Why Doing All of Your Homework is a Waste of Time

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  4. Why Homework is a Waste of Time. by Abigail Pesce

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  5. Homework is a waste of time, new studies say

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  6. Is Homework a Waste of Students’ Time? Study Finds It’s the Biggest

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VIDEO

  1. Go and study don't waste time || Study motivation #shorts #motivation

  2. Why homework?? #shorts

  3. Why waste time at the gym…

  4. Homework Is Totally Waste🤮

  5. WHY HOMEWORK?

  6. Why homework

COMMENTS

  1. Is Homework a Waste of Time? Teachers Weigh In

    In 2003, a pair of national studies found that most American students spent less than an hour daily on homework, and the workload was no bigger than it was 50 years prior. "There is this view in ...

  2. Is Homework Valuable or Not? Try Looking at Quality Instead

    But assignments like color-in-the-blank and word searches are probably just a waste of students' time. "Homework assignments," the study says, "should be thought-provoking." Study ...

  3. Why does homework exist?

    "Some homework is a genuine waste of time and requires lots of resources for no good reason. And other homework is really useful." Cutting homework has to be part of a larger strategy

  4. More than two hours of homework may be counterproductive, research

    In places where students attend high-performing schools, too much homework can reduce their time to foster skills in the area of personal responsibility, the researchers concluded. "Young people are spending more time alone," they wrote, "which means less time for family and fewer opportunities to engage in their communities." Student perspectives

  5. Is homework a waste of time?

    The educational debate over the merits of homework has been going on a long time, with different countries taking very different approaches. Wanting to discover the best approach to setting homework to achieve optimal wellbeing for students and parents, our teaching team collaborated on a research project to help find the solution.

  6. Homework is a waste of time, new studies say

    Sept. 6, 2013, 7:38 AM PDT. By. A new group of studies finds that homework in a variety of subjects has little impact on test grades, although math homework was the exception to the findings.

  7. Is homework beneficial or just a waste of time?

    I interviewed Kate Barczyk, a 7th-grade student here at West and asked her if she learns anything from homework or if it is just a waste of time. She said, "I think homework is just a waste of time. I could be doing more important things." I also talk to some of my friends from school about this topic and most of them say homework is ...

  8. The Homework Debate

    A number of books have recently appeared criticizing homework claiming that kids gain nothing from doing the tons of homework they are assigned. Some even go so far as to say that homework is waste of time. These books draw on research that suggests that, for lower grades (1-6), homework does little-to-nothing to help improve grades.

  9. Homework: Useful Teaching Tool or Waste of Time?

    For secondary students, homework is useful as a "short and focused intervention .". That means something like a research project that you complete at home. 💻. For primary students, homework can help reinforce skills students are learning in school. It makes sense to practice spelling words at home or working on reading skills, for example.

  10. Is Homework a Waste of Students' Time? Study Finds It's the ...

    Homework is taking up a large chunk of their time, too — around 15-plus hours a week, with about one-third of teens reporting that it's closer to 20-plus hours. The stress and excessive ...

  11. Why is Homework Important?

    This is a prime example of why homework is important because time management is a vital life skill that helps children throughout higher education and their careers. 3. Communication Network. Homework acts as a bridge and can help teachers and parents learn more about how students like to learn, providing a deeper understanding of how to ...

  12. The great homework debate

    There's no doubt about the importance of the home-learning environment for children's education but battling over homework makes that a very negative place, she says. However, it's too ...

  13. Study Finds Homework Is the Biggest Cause of Teen Stress

    Is Homework a Waste of Students' Time? Study Finds It's the Biggest Cause of Teen Stress. As the debate over the need for homework continues, a new study found that it's the biggest cause of teen ...

  14. Is Homework a Waste of Time?

    Is Homework a Waste of Time? Kate Shuster. Heinemann-Raintree Library, 2008 - Education - 56 pages. These titles encourage critical thinking and debate by providing case studies, historical contexts, and individual opinions on each issue. Readers are encouraged to think and express themselves independently, evaluatively, and critically.

  15. Why Homework Is a Waste of Time

    Homework is a waste of time. It takes the enjoyment out of school and it takes up teacher time. Students need more free time for other activities such as sports, homework takes it away from ...

  16. Is homework a waste of time for primary school children?

    Calling for its abolition for this age group, the motion at the Association of Teachers and Lecturers conference in Liverpool states that, "homework in the primary school is a waste of children's ...

  17. The truth about homework and why it might be a complete waste of time

    http://www.kidsinthehouse.com/elementary/education/studying-and-homeworkDenise Pop, PhD talks about how homework in our schools might be a waste of time for ...

  18. Is Homework A Waste of Time?

    Homework is helpful. Practice problems do in fact improve test grades and guide students in succeeding in the classroom. However, after about 90 minutes of homework, results will start to diminish. It's important to find the happy-medium when it comes to homework and make sure students aren't overloaded with busy work.

  19. Homework is a Waste of Time

    Mrs. Horvath's Journalism states that they can have anywhere from 20 minutes to two hours of homework a night between all their classes. Free time to yourself is essential, whether it is for sports or just time with your family. Free time gives you a chance to refresh and get ready for the new day to come.

  20. Is Homework A Waste Of Time? Why Is Homework Important

    We have to think about why the ban homework debate is so intense. And there are certain things that make homework a waste of time. Here are some of them: According to scientific studies, it looks like people with a high intellectual level tend to procrastinate more. If you don't do your homework or if you rush it, you usually get a low grade.

  21. 3 Reasons Why Doing Homework is a Waste of Time

    Table of Contents. 3 Reasons Why Doing Homework is a Waste of Time. Not a Sign of Intelligence. Doesn't Make Much Sense. Makes You Miss the Motivation Wave. Wrapping Up. Students are often burdened with doing homework assignments that get the better of them and their valuable time. However, it is also possible for these students to use this ...

  22. Is Homework A Waste of Time? Why Children Avoid Homework

    This month's focus is on Homework: The Great Debate! If we conducted a survey asking teachers, parents and students the pros and cons of homework, I'm sure t...

  23. Undergrad Vs Grad School: Pros, Cons of Social Life, Cost, Specialty

    Graduate school let me narrow in on one specific passion. Graduate school had a specific focus, which allowed me to hone in on my interests. My focus was creative writing, specifically poetry.

  24. Homework is a waste of time. (Junior)

    Homework is an assignment that students are given to do at home. It might be a continuation of classwork or a new piece of work. It may also be preparation for the next class. The amount of homework school students get varies a lot not only from country to country, or from school to school, but often from day to day.

  25. Why is free time still so elusive?

    There have been massive gains in productivity over the past century. So why are people still working so hard for so long? Output per worker increased by almost 300% between 1950 and 2018 in the U ...

  26. Deptford Township School District moving forward with controversial

    Concerns were also raised about the amount of homework being assigned. We surveyed our staff, and according to these results, we believe the homework expectations are quite reasonable.

  27. Merriam-Webster says you can end a sentence with a preposition. The

    Why do people get so worked up? Jovin sees concluding preposition opponents as operatives of a sort of sunk cost fallacy . People have invested a lot of time in finding ways to not end clauses and ...

  28. Wendy's announces Uber-like surge pricing model

    Wendy's CEO Kirk Tanner said the company will spend $20 million on high-tech digital menu boards that can update prices in real time, similar to surge pricing strategies adopted by rideshare companies like Uber and Lyft, airlines and hotels. "During the busy times, they can obviously increase profits then," Brown said.

  29. 15 Reasons Why College Is Not a Waste of Time and Money

    College is a significant investment of time and money, and in recent years, the value of higher education has been a topic of debate. However, there are numerous compelling reasons why college is ...