GCFGlobal Logo

  • Get started with computers
  • Learn Microsoft Office
  • Apply for a job
  • Improve my work skills
  • Design nice-looking docs
  • Getting Started
  • Smartphones & Tablets
  • Typing Tutorial
  • Online Learning
  • Basic Internet Skills
  • Online Safety
  • Social Media
  • Zoom Basics
  • Google Docs
  • Google Sheets
  • Career Planning
  • Resume Writing
  • Cover Letters
  • Job Search and Networking
  • Business Communication
  • Entrepreneurship 101
  • Careers without College
  • Job Hunt for Today
  • 3D Printing
  • Freelancing 101
  • Personal Finance
  • Sharing Economy
  • Decision-Making
  • Graphic Design
  • Photography
  • Image Editing
  • Learning WordPress
  • Language Learning
  • Critical Thinking
  • For Educators
  • Translations
  • Staff Picks
  • English expand_more expand_less

Business Communication  - How to Write a Clear Business Memo

Business communication  -, how to write a clear business memo, business communication how to write a clear business memo.

GCFLearnFree Logo

Business Communication: How to Write a Clear Business Memo

Lesson 10: how to write a clear business memo.

/en/business-communication/how-to-write-an-effective-business-email/content/

How to write a clear business memo

business communication assignment 1 memo

When you need to update your colleagues on important information or make an announcement at your workplace, a business memo can be an ideal way to address a specific audience in a formal context.

Watch the video below to learn how to write a business memo.

The basics of a business memo

While business memos and emails may look similar at first, a memo has some key differences. Memos are usually more formal than emails and are often used when you need to give your message a more official look. They can also be printed and distributed wherever this message would have the most impact.

Memos can be addressed to a single person or a group, so tailor your message to reflect the concerns of your audience. As with any business document, always remain professional and polite, even if you have to address a negative topic. An official memo is no place to single someone out in a critical way, so focus on facts and constructive plans for the future.

Writing a business memo

Business memos usually begin with a header section that lists recipients and other details in the following format:

  • To : Include each recipient’s name and job title (for example, Miranda Lawson, Director of Marketing). If you're addressing a designated group, however, simply state the name of the group (for example, Accounting Department).
  • From : Include your name and title.
  • Date : Write out the complete date (for example, June 30, 2017).
  • Subject : Make the subject brief and descriptive.

Most business memos skip the greeting (such as “Greetings, Ms. Lawson”) and immediately go into the body text. Whenever you start a paragraph in a memo, always put the main point of that paragraph first, as this makes your writing direct and easy to follow.

Generally, memos don’t include a farewell (such as “Sincerely, Tonya”), but it may be appropriate depending on your message or your company’s style. If you do include a farewell, make it brief.

As discussed in the Business Writing Essentials lesson, revision is vital for any quality document. Read over your writing to cut unnecessary material, clarify your main points, and proofread for grammar and factual errors. And before you submit your memo to your audience, consider getting feedback from a colleague to ensure your message is effective and professional.

Examples of business memos

Let’s explore a few business memos to see this lesson in action. We'll start with an example of a poorly written memo.

business communication assignment 1 memo

The example above is not acceptable. The body is unclear and rambling, there’s no subject line, and the main point of each paragraph is difficult to find. The message itself is also incredibly unprofessional, especially because it calls out a single person in a negative way.

Now let’s look at a stronger example.

business communication assignment 1 memo

This is much better! The body is concise and clear, and the main point is the first sentence in each paragraph. There’s also a strong subject line, and the message stays professional despite sharing negative news.

Whether you’re detailing a new policy change or updating staff on a new procedure, business memos are a powerful way to distribute information among your colleagues. As you practice and study, your memos will become more efficient and polished.

previous

/en/business-communication/how-to-format-a-business-document/content/

Logo for M Libraries Publishing

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

9.2 Memorandums and Letters

Learning objectives.

  • Discuss the purpose and format of a memo.
  • Understand effective strategies for business memos.
  • Describe the fifteen parts of a standard business letter.
  • Access sample business letters and write a sample business letter.

A memo (or memorandum, meaning “reminder”) is normally used for communicating policies, procedures, or related official business within an organization. It is often written from a one-to-all perspective (like mass communication), broadcasting a message to an audience, rather than a one-on-one, interpersonal communication. It may also be used to update a team on activities for a given project, or to inform a specific group within a company of an event, action, or observance.

Memo Purpose

A memo’s purpose is often to inform, but it occasionally includes an element of persuasion or a call to action. All organizations have informal and formal communication networks. The unofficial, informal communication network within an organization is often called the grapevine , and it is often characterized by rumor, gossip, and innuendo. On the grapevine, one person may hear that someone else is going to be laid off and start passing the news around. Rumors change and transform as they are passed from person to person, and before you know it, the word is that they are shutting down your entire department.

One effective way to address informal, unofficial speculation is to spell out clearly for all employees what is going on with a particular issue. If budget cuts are a concern, then it may be wise to send a memo explaining the changes that are imminent. If a company wants employees to take action, they may also issue a memorandum. For example, on February 13, 2009, upper management at the Panasonic Corporation issued a declaration that all employees should buy at least $1,600 worth of Panasonic products. The company president noted that if everyone supported the company with purchases, it would benefit all (Lewis, 2009).

While memos do not normally include a call to action that requires personal spending, they often represent the business or organization’s interests. They may also include statements that align business and employee interest, and underscore common ground and benefit.

Memo Format

A memo has a header that clearly indicates who sent it and who the intended recipients are. Pay particular attention to the title of the individual(s) in this section. Date and subject lines are also present, followed by a message that contains a declaration, a discussion, and a summary.

In a standard writing format, we might expect to see an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. All these are present in a memo, and each part has a clear purpose. The declaration in the opening uses a declarative sentence to announce the main topic. The discussion elaborates or lists major points associated with the topic, and the conclusion serves as a summary.

Let’s examine a sample memo.

A letter from an employer to their employees

Five Tips for Effective Business Memos

Audience orientation.

Always consider the audience and their needs when preparing a memo. An acronym or abbreviation that is known to management may not be known by all the employees of the organization, and if the memo is to be posted and distributed within the organization, the goal is clear and concise communication at all levels with no ambiguity.

Professional, Formal Tone

Memos are often announcements, and the person sending the memo speaks for a part or all of the organization. While it may contain a request for feedback, the announcement itself is linear, from the organization to the employees. The memo may have legal standing as it often reflects policies or procedures, and may reference an existing or new policy in the employee manual, for example.

Subject Emphasis

The subject is normally declared in the subject line and should be clear and concise. If the memo is announcing the observance of a holiday, for example, the specific holiday should be named in the subject line—for example, use “Thanksgiving weekend schedule” rather than “holiday observance.”

Direct Format

Some written business communication allows for a choice between direct and indirect formats, but memorandums are always direct. The purpose is clearly announced.

Objectivity

A screen shot of a confusing email. It wraps up with

The words you choose represent you in your absence. Make sure they clearly communicate your message.

wetwebwork – I probably shouldn’t have called Maria the 4th best PM when she left… – CC BY 2.0.

Memos are a place for just the facts, and should have an objective tone without personal bias, preference, or interest on display. Avoid subjectivity.

Letters are brief messages sent to recipients that are often outside the organization (Bovee, C., & Thill, J., 2010). They are often printed on letterhead paper, and represent the business or organization in one or two pages. Shorter messages may include e-mails or memos, either hard copy or electronic, while reports tend to be three or more pages in length.

While e-mail and text messages may be used more frequently today, the effective business letter remains a common form of written communication. It can serve to introduce you to a potential employer, announce a product or service, or even serve to communicate feelings and emotions. We’ll examine the basic outline of a letter and then focus on specific products or writing assignments.

All writing assignments have expectations in terms of language and format. The audience or reader may have their own idea of what constitutes a specific type of letter, and your organization may have its own format and requirements. This chapter outlines common elements across letters, and attention should be directed to the expectations associated with your particular writing assignment. There are many types of letters, and many adaptations in terms of form and content, but in this chapter, we discuss the fifteen elements of a traditional block-style letter.

Letters may serve to introduce your skills and qualifications to prospective employers, deliver important or specific information, or serve as documentation of an event or decision. Regardless of the type of letter you need to write, it can contain up to fifteen elements in five areas. While you may not use all the elements in every case or context, they are listed in Table 9.1 “Elements of a Business Letter” .

Table 9.1 Elements of a Business Letter

Strategies for Effective Letters

Remember that a letter has five main areas:

  • The heading, which establishes the sender, often including address and date
  • The introduction, which establishes the purpose
  • The body, which articulates the message
  • The conclusion, which restates the main point and may include a call to action
  • The signature line, which sometimes includes the contact information

A sample letter is shown in Figure 9.5 “Sample Business Letter” .

Figure 9.5 Sample Business Letter

A sample business letter

Always remember that letters represent you and your company in your absence. In order to communicate effectively and project a positive image,

  • be clear, concise, specific, and respectful;
  • each word should contribute to your purpose;
  • each paragraph should focus on one idea;
  • the parts of the letter should form a complete message;
  • the letter should be free of errors.

Key Takeaways

  • Memos are brief business documents usually used internally to inform or persuade employees concerning business decisions on policy, procedure, or actions.
  • Letters are brief, print messages often used externally to inform or persuade customers, vendors, or the public.
  • A letter has fifteen parts, each fulfilling a specific function.
  • Find a memo from your work or business, or borrow one from someone you know. Share it with your classmates, observing confidentiality by blocking out identifying details such as the name of the sender, recipient, and company. Compare and contrast.
  • Create a draft letter introducing a product or service to a new client. Post and share with classmates.
  • Write a memo informing your class that an upcoming holiday will be observed. Post and share with classmates.
  • Find a business letter (for example, an offer you received from a credit card company or a solicitation for a donation) and share it with your classmates. Look for common elements and points of difference.
  • Now that you have reviewed a sample letter, and learned about the five areas and fifteen basic parts of any business letter, write a business letter that informs a prospective client or customer of a new product or service.

Bovee, C., & Thill, J. (2010). Business communication essentials: a skills-based approach to vital business English (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Lewis, L. (2009, February 13). Panasonic orders staff to buy £1,000 in products . Retrieved from http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/markets/japan/article5723942.ece .

Business Communication for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Business growth

Business tips

How to write a memo (and all the templates and examples you could need)

A hero image of an orange document icon on a light yellow background.

Memos are the unsung heroes of business communication and, ironically, a Hollywood tool used to patch over glaring plot holes that 12 writers in a room couldn't figure out. I'm no seasoned Hollywood critic, but "Didn't you get the memo?" must be one of the most overused catalyst phrases in cinematic history.

In business applications, memos are simple documents that briefly and accurately convey internal communications in a way that lengthy reports can't. The whole idea is to highlight important or urgent information in a digestible format.

Contrary to common belief, memos aren't always written on sticky notes and don't always fix bad screenwriting. But they do facilitate internal communication in a unique way that has kept them present in the business world for decades running.

Table of contents:

What is a memorandum (memo)?

A memo is a concise written message that communicates important information like directives, updates, announcements, or policy changes. While a report includes context, conclusions, and detailed information, a memo briefly highlights a specific point whenever you just need to hit the broad strokes quickly and get a head start on any urgent internal developments.

I like to think of sirens as the memo and the police officer at my window as the full report. The former does a great job of alerting me to my shortcomings as a driver, and the latter lets me know exactly how. 

How to write a memo

Pop culture would have you believe that you need sticky notes or tiny cards to write a memo. Giving credit where it's due, "The Office" managed to do its part to dispel the stereotype, and I'm sure all memo enthusiasts are ever thankful for the effort.

While there's no restriction on the size or color of the paper you use, the font, or background colors you feel are most soothing for urgent news, there's a memo format that helps this message provide all the information it's intended to deliver and remain brief at the same time. 

I'd like to demystify yet another business tool that Hollywood just decided to overwork for three decades and show you how to write a memo in four easy steps.

1. Write a clear and concise heading 

Your heading makes it clear who the memo is from, who it's for, and what it relates to, as well as the date of its distribution. A well-written heading identifies the parties the message is meant for and the main topic of conversation.

TO: Sales staff

FROM: John Daxler

DATE: 02/10/2024

SUBJECT: Shipping policy changes

2. Include a simple introduction

Your introduction should take up the first two or three sentences of the memo's body. This is where you provide context, summarizing the subject and pointing out the purpose of the message.

Considering the response we've received from customers regarding our shipping policies, we're making some changes to accommodate our users and facilitate future transactions. These policy changes will be implemented on 03/01/2024.

3. Write a body that accurately captures your message 

With the introduction providing just enough context for the reader to understand the point of the memo, it's time to focus on providing a bit more detail. 

Start by making a list of any resources, contact points, or action items that relate to the matter at hand. Outline these details in the body, so your team knows what to do next.

The policy changes include reduced shipping fees in most categories and a new order return process. We anticipate that with these changes, there will be more efforts to recruit sales personnel and expand our team.

For reference, see the detailed report of these policy changes as well as the new fee change guidelines attached.

4. Conclude with a professional closing statement

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me or Clarissa Jones via email or Zoom Chat. We're happy to support you however we can as the new policy goes into effect.

5 memo templates to get you started

Policy change memo.

Screenshot of Zapier's policy change memo template on an orange background

This memo template contains a section dedicated to the policy change's most important details, like an outline of the previous policy, a brief description of the new policy, and the date that the change goes into effect. This information should always be shared first to clearly communicate the change.

The second section of the body contains the reason for the policy change and some context regarding the expected impact on employees and the next steps.

Tip: Outline the previous policy details in the memo, so readers can easily identify the changes.

Meeting agenda memo

Screenshot of Zapier's meeting agenda memo template on an orange background

This memo template focuses on breaking down a meeting into easily digestible bullet points that outline the structure of the meeting and briefly explain each topic of conversation. This helps keep your team aligned, organized, and focused, so the meeting can be as productive as possible.

Tip: Provide your team with a timeline for submissions ahead of the meeting to allow time for creative contributions.

Progress report memo

Screenshot of Zapier's progress report memo template on an orange background

Progress report memos often come across as any report would. The difference is in the amount of detail and context included in the document. A progress report memo shouldn't delve too deep into the nitty-gritty of your hard-earned retainer—it should concisely highlight key achievements.

Tip: Use the "Challenges encountered" section to keep your team in the loop regarding difficulties that need to be considered for upcoming milestones or future progress report memos. 

Instructional memo

Screenshot of Zapier's instructional memo template on an orange background

Instructional memos can be very helpful when a new process is implemented or when a new hire needs to be informed about how to accomplish a certain task. This memo is a step-by-step guide at its core.

Tip: Make sure to provide more detailed resources or training materials that further elaborate on the contents of the memo.

Request memo

Screenshot of Zapier's request memo template on an orange background

Request memos are one of the most popular types of memos and are used for both internal and external communication. For example, an employee could use a request memo to seek additional resources for a project or approval to attend a training event. A business can also send a request memo to a supplier requesting a quote for services or goods.

Tip: Since it's a request, make sure your memo provides enough context and background information to be as persuasive as needed. 

Business memo examples in action

I realize that memos aren't the most cinematic item on anyone's mind, but I'm determined to go the extra mile that movies will not and show you what a memo looks like in practice.

Office closure memo

Illustrated example of an office closure memo on a light peach background

Depending on where you live, this might be a familiar sight. I've worked in tropical weather for the majority of my career, so this particular memo is just a bizarre mythical thing that I deny exists on Reddit threads.

If such a thing existed, it would efficiently highlight the issue, the solution, and most importantly, the dates it pertains to. In this example, the date in question is mentioned three times. 

Company event memo

Illustrated example of a company event memo on a light peach background

Memos for team events and company picnics generally read like an invitation, with the event details highlighted at the very beginning of the document. This way, your team will already be putting together a plan to keep Matthew away from the grill 10 seconds into reading the memo.

PTO policy change memo

Illustrated example of a PTO policy change memo on a light peach background

This example of a policy change memo is long compared to what you might expect, but given the topic, it's imperative to provide as much context as possible before people start banging on your door with pitchforks to talk about PTO.

The way it's presented reflects exactly what the change is about and shows employees it's a positive adjustment that warrants absolutely no pitchforks on company grounds.

Strategy meeting agenda memo

Illustrated example of a strategy meeting agenda memo on a light peach background

Tips for using memo templates effectively

While a template can help you write a well-structured memo, it's important to make it your own. Be it the writing style, the visual aspect, or the information itself, business communication is most effective when it's personalized.

Incorporate your brand: You can use your company logo and unique brand colors or themes.

Ensure consistency in memo writing: As memos become a part of your communication processes, it's important to be consistent in how they're written and presented.

Implement a review and revision process: Reduce the chances of errors and typos by having a reviewer proofread your memo and approve its contents.

I've always believed that seamless business communication isn't about copying and pasting a complex system that might not work for your company. It's more about making the most of available communication tools and channels until they naturally develop into a system that serves your needs.

Will you be annoyed every time a coworker says, "Did you get the memo?" Yes, you will be. Will it be time-consuming to keep up with this form of business communication? Also yes. But that's a give and take every business reaches in its own time. 

Related reading:

Get productivity tips delivered straight to your inbox

We’ll email you 1-3 times per week—and never share your information.

Hachem Ramki picture

Hachem Ramki

Hachem is a writer and digital marketer from Montreal. After graduating with a degree in English, Hachem spent seven years traveling around the world before moving to Canada. When he's not writing, he enjoys Basketball, Dungeons and Dragons, and playing music for friends and family.

Related articles

Hero image with an icon representing an AI agent

Enterprise AI: How companies can use AI across the organization

Enterprise AI: How companies can use AI...

Hero image of a woman doing a makeup tutorial to a camera

How to start a successful side hustle

Two orange people icons on a light orange background with a dotted line behind it.

11 management styles, plus tips for applying each type

11 management styles, plus tips for applying...

business communication assignment 1 memo

Keep your company adaptable with automation

Improve your productivity automatically. Use Zapier to get your apps working together.

A Zap with the trigger 'When I get a new lead from Facebook,' and the action 'Notify my team in Slack'

Register now

How it works

Transform your enterprise with the scalable mindsets, skills, & behavior change that drive performance.

Explore how BetterUp connects to your core business systems.

We pair AI with the latest in human-centered coaching to drive powerful, lasting learning and behavior change.

Build leaders that accelerate team performance and engagement.

Unlock performance potential at scale with AI-powered curated growth journeys.

Build resilience, well-being and agility to drive performance across your entire enterprise.

Transform your business, starting with your sales leaders.

Unlock business impact from the top with executive coaching.

Foster a culture of inclusion and belonging.

Accelerate the performance and potential of your agencies and employees.

See how innovative organizations use BetterUp to build a thriving workforce.

Discover how BetterUp measurably impacts key business outcomes for organizations like yours.

A demo is the first step to transforming your business. Meet with us to develop a plan for attaining your goals.

Request a demo

  • What is coaching?

Learn how 1:1 coaching works, who its for, and if it's right for you.

Accelerate your personal and professional growth with the expert guidance of a BetterUp Coach.

Types of Coaching

Navigate career transitions, accelerate your professional growth, and achieve your career goals with expert coaching.

Enhance your communication skills for better personal and professional relationships, with tailored coaching that focuses on your needs.

Find balance, resilience, and well-being in all areas of your life with holistic coaching designed to empower you.

Discover your perfect match : Take our 5-minute assessment and let us pair you with one of our top Coaches tailored just for you.

Find your Coach

Research, expert insights, and resources to develop courageous leaders within your organization.

Best practices, research, and tools to fuel individual and business growth.

View on-demand BetterUp events and learn about upcoming live discussions.

The latest insights and ideas for building a high-performing workplace.

  • BetterUp Briefing

The online magazine that helps you understand tomorrow's workforce trends, today.

Innovative research featured in peer-reviewed journals, press, and more.

Founded in 2022 to deepen the understanding of the intersection of well-being, purpose, and performance

We're on a mission to help everyone live with clarity, purpose, and passion.

Join us and create impactful change.

Read the buzz about BetterUp.

Meet the leadership that's passionate about empowering your workforce.

Find your Coach

For Business

For Individuals

How to write a memo: 8 steps with examples

woman-drinking-coffee-and-typing-on-laptop-while-working-at-home-how-to-write-a-memo

Jump to section

What’s a memorandum?

How to write a business memo in 8 steps, when to write a memo, 5 examples of memos, unleashing the power of effective memos.

Whether you’re planning a meeting or working on a project with dozens of moving parts, effective communication is the key to success. 

But it’s hard to keep everyone in the loop all the time. You can’t always host a 1:1 meeting or talk to coworkers face-to-face when new information arises. Sometimes, all you need is a short notification that alerts everyone at the same time — and does so quickly.

Memos provide a streamlined channel for internal communication. In a short space, you can share vital information with clarity and impact. Here’s the step-by-step process of how to write a memo with specific examples, from crafting a compelling header to including action plans and timelines.

A memorandum, also known as a memo, is a concise written message that quickly and efficiently shares vital information. This could come in the form of an email, Slack announcement, or a piece of paper on a bulletin board, depending on the workplace.

A well-structured memo offers lots of information in a short space. It does everything from announcing changes in company policy to providing vital project updates, all without wasting readers’ time. Anyone can write an email, but memo-writing is a learned skill that takes time to truly perfect.

To create a succinct and comprehensive memo, formatting is key. Just like a professional email , every piece of information plays a role in making the memo easily digestible and actionable — from subject line to salutation . 

Here’s a step-by-step approach to ensure your messages are both effective and clear:

1. Start with a header

To set the stage, always start with a comprehensive header. The header should include the date and the general subject, along with who the memo is to and from. These elements offer context and ensure that readers quickly grasp the basic premise, aiding quick decision-making about the action they need to take.

2. Craft a clear objective statement

The first paragraph of your memo should directly express its purpose in an objective statement or problem statement . This not only helps the recipients understand the memo's relevance, but also ensures they grasp its intent swiftly.

Think of a cover letter . The first line is usually something like “I am writing to…” A memo should have the same clarity so readers immediately know what they’re looking at and why.

woman-at-virtual-meeting-writing-on-notebook-how-to-write-a-memo

3. Provide a comprehensive body paragraph

The body of the memo is where you'll develop your main points, so it should be as comprehensive as possible despite the short space. Always start with critical details as early as possible, then move towards less significant but still pertinent information. 

To enhance readability, structure the body using bullet points or numbered lists. And remember to stay away from unnecessary jargon that may confuse your readers. A memo’s goal is brevity, so make sure it’s easy to understand.

4. Provide background information

If your memo references previous events, circumstances, or memos, include a brief background section. This provides context, orients your readers, and ties your current communication to past events or actions, offering a holistic understanding of the situation at hand.

5. Include action items and timelines

Memos often need to include a call to action that tells readers what to do next, whether that’s to acknowledge receipt or find a meeting room ASAP. Clearly define the steps they need to take, identify the parties responsible, and specify the deadlines for these tasks.

By doing so, you encourage accountability and create a shared understanding of expectations, fostering a more organized and efficient work environment .

womans-hand-writing-on-calendar-how-to-write-a-memo

6. Add a summary

If your memo tackles a complex issue or is particularly lengthy, add a short conclusion to summarize the most important points. In the absence of face-to-face cues, reiterating the main points through a brief summary reinforces the essential elements of your message, aiding comprehension.

7. Include your contact information

As hard as you may try, communication isn’t always clear. People might have questions about what to do next, and failing to provide a clear path toward those answers could add unnecessary hurdles. 

To avoid this, always add your contact information at the end of your memo, whether that’s your desk location or your Slack handle. This lets your colleagues reach out if they have questions or need further clarification on any points.

8. Add attachments if necessary

If you reference other documents, graphs, or materials, either attach them or provide accessible links. This ensures that your readers have all the resources at their disposal to fully understand and act upon the memo. Linking out also keeps you from adding too much information to the memo itself.

According to Gallup’s 2022 State of the Global Workplace Report, 41% of employees wish they could change their company’s engagement or culture . And communication falls into that category. Meetings, emails, and effective memos all support the interactions that uplift strong culture .

Knowing when to write a memo helps you choose the right type of communication for the situation and avoid information silos . Here are some scenarios where memos shine:

Inform about company policies or changes: If your organization is undergoing changes in policies, procedures, or strategies, a memo is an excellent way to update staff. It ensures uniform understanding and gives everyone the chance to ask questions as soon as possible, saving time and stunting the spread of misinformation.

Raise awareness about an issue: If a significant issue is impacting your organization's functioning, a memo brings it to everyone's attention. In this situation, a memo is also vital for overall engagement and the employee experience because it keeps people in the loop on important issues and reinforces the value of their contributions.

Provide updates on a project: Memos are a great tool for informing stakeholders about a project's progress, timeline adjustments, or resource requirements. Informing everyone of all the project's deadlines and ongoing developments prevents roadblocks and helps projects run smoothly.

Make a request: A memo effectively communicates formal requests, including those for resources, approvals, or feedback . By clearly articulating the reasons and potential benefits of your request, a memo acts as a persuasive tool for support or approval. It can also anticipate and address possible questions.

Recognize employee achievement: Memos are also a method for acknowledging outstanding employee performance a nd achievements like a promotion . This has the multipurpose effect of expressing recognition for hard work while emphasizing company values , boosting morale , and fostering a positive work environment.

man-sitting-on-stairs-outdoors-writing-on-his-laptop-how-to-write-a-memo

To help you better visualize how to write a good memo, here are five memo examples for different situations:

1. Change in policy memo 

This example not only outlines changes in company policy, but also explains the reasons behind the change. It encourages questions and tells readers exactly where to go for more information, offering transparency and support.

To: [person or department name]

From: [person or department name]

Date: [insert date]

Subject: [subject] Policy Change

I'm writing to inform you of an important update regarding [policy]. Effective [date], we will be implementing changes to [specific details of the policy changes].

The purpose of this change is to [explain the rationale behind the change and its benefits]. We believe that these adjustments will contribute to [goal].

Please take the time to review the attached document outlining the updated policy in detail. Should you have any questions or concerns, feel free to reach out to [contact person or department].

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Best regards,

2. Project update memo

An update memo keeps everyone informed about a project's progress, any changes to the original plan, or any challenges along the way. This ongoing communication helps preempt problems and ensures everyone is working towards the same goals.

Subject: [project name] Update

Here’s an update on the progress of [project name]. Here are the key developments since our last update:

  • [a summary of tasks and milestones]
  • [any challenges or issues and how they were resolved]
  • [any adjustments to the project timeline or scope, if applicable]

Overall, we’re making steady progress and remain on track to meet our goals. Please stay vigilant and continue to give your best effort to ensure the successful completion of this project.

If you have any questions or need further clarification, please don't hesitate to reach out to me. Let's keep up the excellent work!

3. Issue alert memo

This type of memo raises awareness about a specific issue affecting the company, a department, or a specific project. Besides highlighting the problem, it may also suggest potential steps to address it, encouraging proactive problem-solving within the organization.

Subject: [subject] Issue

I'm writing to bring your attention to an issue with [subject]. It has come to our attention that [describe the issue and its impact on the company or employees].

We understand the potential challenges that this may pose and are actively working on resolving the situation. In the meantime, we encourage everyone to [provide any necessary instructions or precautions].

Rest assured that we’re taking this matter seriously, and we will keep you updated on any progress or further instructions. If you have any insights or suggestions related to this issue, please share them with [contact person or department].

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

hand-typing-on-laptop-and-writing-on-notebook-how-to-write-a-memo

4. Request memo 

A request memo formalizes a need for resources, feedback, or approval. By clearly outlining the reasons behind the request, you effectively communicate the need for these items and the impact they could have on the team.

Subject: [specific request]

Hi [person or department name],

I hope this message finds you well. I'm writing to formally request [specific request]. This is because [provide a concise explanation of the request, including its importance and potential benefits for the company].

I’ve attached a detailed proposal outlining the specifics of the request, including [details, supporting data, and relevant information]. 

Should you have any questions or require further information, please don't hesitate to reach out to me. I appreciate your attention.

5. Employee recognition memo

According to data from Gallup, employees who don’t experience enough recognition are twice as likely to say they’ll quit in the next year .

A memo is a quick way to give kudos and celebrate an employee's achievement or contribution to the company. Not only does it express appreciation for hard work , but it also boosts morale and fosters a healthy environment for everyone.

Subject: Quick kudos

Let’s all take a moment to appreciate [employee name] from [department/team]’s exceptional performance and dedication. They have consistently demonstrated [specific achievements, qualities, or contributions].

Their hard work and commitment to excellence have been truly remarkable and deserving of recognition. [employee name]’s efforts reflect positively on the entire team and contribute to our overall success as a company.

Please join me in congratulating [employee name] for their outstanding achievement. We appreciate their continued dedication and professionalism. Let's celebrate this milestone and continue to inspire and support one another in our respective roles.

Warmest congratulations once again!

Mastering how to write a memo is an essential skill in the corporate world because it lets you convey a message with clarity and simplicity.

Whether you're drafting a project update or learning how to write a memo to your boss, you can become a better communicator and break down silos. Never underestimate the power of a well-structured and purposeful memo.

Elevate your communication skills

Unlock the power of clear and persuasive communication. Our coaches can guide you to build strong relationships and succeed in both personal and professional life.

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

How improving your concentration helps your memory

Learn what process mapping is and how to create one (+ examples), what is lateral thinking 7 techniques to encourage creative ideas, learn to let it go: how to deal with career disappointment, how to make a daily schedule: tips and examples, curious wanting to learn more is key to career success, how to create a work plan (with template), how to prioritize tasks: 7 tips to perfect your workflow, squirrel how to increase attention span so you get stuff done, similar articles, how to write an exciting promotion announcement, how to write an executive summary in 10 steps, how to create a scope of work in 8 steps, write thank you letters after interviews to stand out as job applicant, 3 stand-out professional bio examples to inspire your own, how to call in sick and what to say (with examples), 8 tips on how to write a professional email (with examples), write an intro email to a new team to start your job on the right foot, how to send a reminder email that’s professional and effective, stay connected with betterup, get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research..

3100 E 5th Street, Suite 350 Austin, TX 78702

  • Platform Overview
  • Integrations
  • Powered by AI
  • BetterUp Lead™
  • BetterUp Manage™
  • BetterUp Care®
  • Sales Performance
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Case Studies
  • Why BetterUp?
  • About Coaching
  • Find your Coach
  • Career Coaching
  • Communication Coaching
  • Life Coaching
  • News and Press
  • Leadership Team
  • Become a BetterUp Coach
  • BetterUp Labs
  • Center for Purpose & Performance
  • Leadership Training
  • Business Coaching
  • Contact Support
  • Contact Sales
  • Privacy Policy
  • Acceptable Use Policy
  • Trust & Security
  • Cookie Preferences

How to Write a Business Memo

Learn how to effectively communicate your ideas, decisions, requests, and announcements to your team.

A memo, or memorandum, is one of the most common forms of business communication. While the way memos are distributed has changed – emails have taken the place of printed notes and physical company notice boards – they still play a crucial role in keeping all employees on the same page.

Let's dive deeper into what a business memo is and how to write it effectively.

What is a business memo?

Business memo format, how to write a business memo, business memo template.

A memo is a note or a document distributed within an organization to share information . The term comes from the Latin word "memorandum", meaning "notable" or "memorable".

Memo template

Memos are often used to effectively communicate ideas, decisions, requests, or announcements to large groups of employees, like your entire department or everyone at the company – for example, a new internal policy introduction, a reminder the clean the shared breakroom, or an invitation to attend a staff party.

A memo allows companies to disseminate information and communicate with their teams asynchronously , without having to schedule extra meetings or communicate important announcements one line at a time on Slack.

Here is an example of a business memo created in Nuclino , a unified workspace for all your team's knowledge, docs, and projects:

Sample business memo

A memo in a business wiki (created in Nuclino )

Nuclino can be a great solution for sharing memos and collaborating on documents , but it can serve equally well as an internal knowledge base , a project management tool , a technical documentation tool , and more. It works like a collective brain, allowing you to bring all your team's work together and collaborate without the chaos of files and folders, context switching, or silos.

Business memo software board view

Although they can take different forms, business memos are always brief, clear, single-subject documents. They follow a simple structure and usually include the following sections:

Date: Include the full date of the memo.

To: Include each recipient’s name and job title. If you're addressing a group – a team, a department, or the entire company – simply state the name of the group.

From: Include your name and title.

Subject: Keep the subject brief and clear.

Body: Concisely summarize the issue.

It may also be helpful to include the business phone number or email address of someone who can address any follow-up queries.

The tone of business memos tends to be fairly friendly and informal. A signature is usually not included, but it may be appropriate depending on your message or your company’s style.

When it comes to writing memos, there are several simple dos and don'ts to keep in mind:

Get to the point immediately. Structure the memo so that the most important information comes in the beginning. Don't write detailed introductions or give extensive overviews of the topic, start with the reason you are writing this memo.

Use bullet points. If you have several issues to cover, structure them as a bulleted list. This will make your memo easier to read and digest.

Use headings. If the memo is longer than one paragraph, consider dividing the body into several sections to allow the readers to quickly scan the contents.

Be succinct. Keep the memo focused on one main point. If you want to provide your readers with more information, link to other resources and keep the document no longer than 1-2 pages.

Use a template: When you find a format that works for your company or your team, stick to it and use it consistently. Create a memo template and share it with your colleagues.

Don't print it out: Avoid distributing printed out memos – you will end up with important memos buried under other paperwork on your employees' desks and outdated memos creating confusion. Instead, share the memo online, for example, through your internal wiki or company intranet .

Don't discard old memos: Another good reason to have a dedicated tool for your memos – such as a wiki or knowledge base software – is that it gives you one central place to organize all your memos. Chances are, you may want to revisit an old memo in the future, and you wouldn't want to waste any time hunting through your inbox.

If your company doesn't have a team wiki , you can easily create one in Nuclino . Nuclino is a collaborative workspace that will not only make it easy to share memos with your team, but also allow your colleagues to give their input.

Your team can ask questions and share their feedback directly in the document, so that you can be sure your memo got the message across. Use comments and mention individual members or groups to send them a notification and grab their attention.

Business memo example with feedback

Make sure to create a template for your memos and have it used by the entire team. If all your memos have a consistent style and structure, they will be much easier to write and understand.

There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to writing memos, but most companies use a similar format. Copy and customize this memo template for your own team:

Business memo example

Business memo template (created in Nuclino )

Writing memos may seem like a trivial task, but it's a fundamental part of internal communication for every organization.

If the memo doesn't reach its intended audience or is written in an unclear way, it may end up creating confusion and resulting in unnecessary meetings just to get everyone on the same page. When done correctly, however, a memo can be one of the most effective ways to share information and keep your team aligned.

Nuclino : Your team's collective brain

Nuclino

Nuclino brings all your team's knowledge, docs, and projects together in one place. It's a modern, simple, and blazingly fast way to collaborate, without the chaos of files and folders, context switching, or silos.

Create a central knowledge base and give your team a single source of truth.

Collaborate in real time or asynchronously and spend less time in meetings.

Manage and document your projects in one place without losing context.

Organize, sort, and filter all kinds of data with ease.

Integrate the tools you love , like Slack, Google Drive, Figma, Lucidchart, and more.

Ready to get started?

  • Why Nuclino?
  • Apps & Integrations
  • Sidekick (AI)

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons

Margin Size

  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Business LibreTexts

2.4.15: Assignment- Writing In Business- Analyzing a Memo

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 61821

\( \newcommand{\vecs}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

\( \newcommand{\vecd}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash {#1}}} \)

\( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\) \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\) \( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\) \( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

\( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\) \( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

\( \newcommand{\inner}[2]{\langle #1, #2 \rangle}\)

\( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

\( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\)

\( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\)

\( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

\( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\)

\( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

\( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\) \( \newcommand{\AA}{\unicode[.8,0]{x212B}}\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorA}[1]{\vec{#1}}      % arrow\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorAt}[1]{\vec{\text{#1}}}      % arrow\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorB}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorC}[1]{\textbf{#1}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorD}[1]{\overrightarrow{#1}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorDt}[1]{\overrightarrow{\text{#1}}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectE}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash{\mathbf {#1}}}} \)

Understanding the functions of interoffice memos is crucial when choosing the best communication channel in the workplace. Being able to analyze the audience and purpose of a scenario is an important skill to help you justify the necessity and effectiveness of a memo.

Download this memo, in which a university president addresses the employees at the university:

  • Sample memo (.docx)
  • Sample memo (PDF)

After reading the memo carefully answer the following questions:

  • Based on what we have read on audience and purpose in this module, describe your thoughts on the memo content and format.
  • Did the writer choose the best delivery channel for this message?
  • Are there any places you believe the writer could be more clear?

Be prepared to share your answers and findings in class during a follow-up discussion.

Grading Rubric

Contributors and attributions.

  • Assignment: Writing In Business: Analyzing a Memo. Authored by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons

Margin Size

  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Social Sci LibreTexts

4.15: Assignment- Communicating in Business

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 59064

\( \newcommand{\vecs}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

\( \newcommand{\vecd}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash {#1}}} \)

\( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\) \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\) \( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\) \( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

\( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\) \( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

\( \newcommand{\inner}[2]{\langle #1, #2 \rangle}\)

\( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

\( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\)

\( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

\( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\)

\( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

\( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\)

\( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

\( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\) \( \newcommand{\AA}{\unicode[.8,0]{x212B}}\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorA}[1]{\vec{#1}}      % arrow\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorAt}[1]{\vec{\text{#1}}}      % arrow\)

\( \newcommand{\vectorB}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorC}[1]{\textbf{#1}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorD}[1]{\overrightarrow{#1}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectorDt}[1]{\overrightarrow{\text{#1}}} \)

\( \newcommand{\vectE}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash{\mathbf {#1}}}} \)

Your task is to read the statements below and rate your perception of your communication skills.

  • Download a PDF of this form here.
  • Download a .docx file of this form here.

After rating your skills, write a short response to the following questions (max 500 words)

  • What are your strongest and weakest skills?
  • How do you think this class will help you improve or  build upon your current communication skill set?

Your task is to write an email to your instructor to introduce yourself. Put your first and last name and the assignment title in the subject line. For example: Maria Ruiz Assignment 1

Your message should address the following:

  • Reasons for taking this class
  • Your career goals (short term/long term)
  • Familiarity with computer technology
  • A brief discussion of how you view your current communication skill levels. Were there any parts of the quiz that surprised you? What are your strongest and weakest skills?
  • Is there anything in the class/syllabus that worries you? Any topic you are excited about or have extensive experience with?

Grading Rubric

Contributors and attributions.

  • Assignment: Communicating in Business. Provided by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

Resources: Discussions and Assignments

Module 3 assignment: written communication.

You are a regional manager at the Walk-In Closet clothing store and you just received the most recent feedback from a mystery shopper’s in-store experience report. One thing that caught your eye in this report is the mystery shopper had a hard time identifying a staff member to help them get a changing room. They go on to mention that it was difficult to distinguish between who was a sales associate and who was a customer because there was no standard work uniform. This is not the first time you have read a comment like this. You decide it is time to take action by establishing a dress code for all staff. You are aware there may be some push back from the staff, but if you provide each employee with at least one Walk-In Closet shirt (short or long sleeve) the dress code transition may be easier.

Your task is to write a three-paragraph (minimum) memo addressed to the store managers in your region on the decision to implement an employee dress code program that will be fully implemented by the start of Q3. This memo will discuss the rationale, benefits, costs, and time frame involved in executing the new dress code policy. Be sure to address the audience properly and write as a concerned executive. You may also draw from your personal work experience with appropriate examples to support your references.

If you’re not familiar with the Memo style, you can view a sample memo . (Note: Your memo does not need to contain every section included in the sample memo. Just be sure to include the date, recipient, sender, subject, and at least three paragraphs addressing the topic.)

Grading Rubric

  • Written Communication. Authored by : Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

Footer Logo Lumen Waymaker

IMAGES

  1. Business Communication

    business communication assignment 1 memo

  2. Preview Business Communication Memo Format

    business communication assignment 1 memo

  3. Assignment 1.docx

    business communication assignment 1 memo

  4. English 302/Business Communication Spring 2004 Assignment #1

    business communication assignment 1 memo

  5. Business Communication Assignment

    business communication assignment 1 memo

  6. Business Communication Assignment

    business communication assignment 1 memo

VIDEO

  1. Effective Business Communication1

  2. Business Communication (Importance Question Of Business Communication for BBA, BCA, B.COM) 2021-22

  3. Business communication

  4. BCA 106 Most Important Questions Business Communication

  5. business communication for b.com 1st semester chapter 1

  6. BEGG-171# UNIT-1 # BLOCK -1 # MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS..PART-2

COMMENTS

  1. Business Communication: How to Write a Clear Business Memo

    From: Include your name and title. Date: Write out the complete date (for example, June 30, 2017). Subject: Make the subject brief and descriptive. Most business memos skip the greeting (such as "Greetings, Ms. Lawson") and immediately go into the body text. Whenever you start a paragraph in a memo, always put the main point of that ...

  2. Business 113

    For this assignment, please create a memo to be shared on a company intranet explaining the use of verbal or non-verbal communication in the workplace. Your memo should be between 250-500 words ...

  3. How To Write a Business Memo in 4 Steps (With Examples)

    How to write a business memo. Follow these steps to help you write your next business memo: 1. List the purpose of the memo in the introductory paragraph. Readers should know instantly what you're communicating to your audience in the introductory paragraph. You need to craft the content of your memo to address questions that employees may have.

  4. 9.2 Memorandums and Letters

    Memos. A memo (or memorandum, meaning "reminder") is normally used for communicating policies, procedures, or related official business within an organization. It is often written from a one-to-all perspective (like mass communication), broadcasting a message to an audience, rather than a one-on-one, interpersonal communication.

  5. How to write a memo [with templates and examples]

    1. Write a clear and concise heading. Your heading makes it clear who the memo is from, who it's for, and what it relates to, as well as the date of its distribution. A well-written heading identifies the parties the message is meant for and the main topic of conversation. Example.

  6. How to Write a Memo in 8 Steps (with Examples)

    6. Add a summary. If your memo tackles a complex issue or is particularly lengthy, add a short conclusion to summarize the most important points. In the absence of face-to-face cues, reiterating the main points through a brief summary reinforces the essential elements of your message, aiding comprehension. 7.

  7. How to Write a Business Memo: Format, Templates, and Examples

    They follow a simple structure and usually include the following sections: Date: Include the full date of the memo. To: Include each recipient's name and job title. If you're addressing a group - a team, a department, or the entire company - simply state the name of the group. From: Include your name and title.

  8. Memos

    Memorandums, or memos, are quite similar to email messages. Memos, like emails, also contain a "To" and "From," a meaningful subject line, and states the reason for the communication immediately in the message. Memos also require strong organization in the body of the message for readability, and a call for action at the end.

  9. Writing a Business Memo

    Business memos should be straightforward, accessible, and brief. They tend not to exceed one page, single-spaced, with size 11 or 12 Times New Roman font. Remember, the word "memorandum" is basically defined as succinct and noteworthy. Thus, keeping your message brief and relevant is important.

  10. How To Write a Business Memo (With Template and Examples)

    To write an effective business memo, follow these steps: 1. Write a detailed subject line. To ensure your readers know exactly what to expect from the memo, write a detailed subject line. The subject line can tell your audience how important the message is and give them guidance on where to file it in their email folders.

  11. Assignment: Analyzing a Memo

    Assignment: Writing in Business: Analyzing a Memo. Understanding the functions of interoffice memos is crucial when choosing the best communication channel in the workplace. Being able to analyze the audience and purpose of a scenario is an important skill to help you justify the necessity and effectiveness of a memo.

  12. A Complete Guide to Memo Writing (With Tips and Examples)

    A memo, or memorandum, is a written document that businesses use to communicate an announcement or notification. While memos were once the primary form of written internal communication in a business, they are now commonly sent in the form of an email. In this article, we explain what a memo is and demonstrate how to assemble the standard parts of a memo in a way that's clear and concise.

  13. Assignment: Writing In Business: Analyzing a Memo

    Business Communication Skills for Managers. Module 2: Writing in Business. Search for: Assignment: Writing In Business: Analyzing a Memo. Step 1: To view this assignment, click on Assignment: Writing in Business: Analyzing a Memo. Step 2: Follow the instructions in the assignment and submit your completed assignment into the LMS.

  14. 2.4.15: Assignment- Writing In Business- Analyzing a Memo

    Download this memo, in which a university president addresses the employees at the university: Sample memo (.docx) Sample memo (PDF) After reading the memo carefully answer the following questions: Based on what we have read on audience and purpose in this module, describe your thoughts on the memo content and format.

  15. 4.15: Assignment- Communicating in Business

    Part 2. Your task is to write an email to your instructor to introduce yourself. Put your first and last name and the assignment title in the subject line. For example: Maria Ruiz Assignment 1. Your message should address the following: Reasons for taking this class. Your career goals (short term/long term)

  16. Memo

    Memo. Memos are usually created by people within a company for either the entire company or specific groups for the purpose of reporting information, announcing policy changes or new policies, giving valuable instruction to groups of people, or delegating responsibility. Memos are a form of communication that can be written on paper or sent as ...

  17. Assignment 1

    COMM 12423 Business Communication Assignment 1 Direct Instructional Memo (10%) Instructions: • Direction: choose one of the scenarios on the second page and write an inter-office memo. • Due Date: October 2, 7 a.m. • Format: proper Memo format in Microsoft Word. • Submission: via Dropbox on Slate. • Length: memo should be no more than two pages and no less than one full typed page ...

  18. Memo notes

    1 Assignment 1 Memo Analyzing Workplace Communication • Written in class during week 2; revision due week 4 • ~400 words • W Component 10% of final grade • Use Chapter 1 At some point in your career, you will be asked to develop a type of communication that is unfamiliar to you. Because you will want the communication to reflect your abilities as a valuable member of the organization ...

  19. Memo.pdf

    Business Communication: Assignment 1 - Memo 2 In order to be an effective communicator and be a successful manager, you need to respect all employees, cultures, background and ethnicities present in the organization. Collaborate with one another and try to help your peers wherever required. Always remember to effectively use both verbal and non verbal communication in organizational settings ...

  20. Assignment Memo

    Writing 1 Summary Memo. School of engineering technology and applied science, Centennial College. ENGL 253: Advanced Business Communications. Instructor: Evelyn Glube. October 14, 2020. Hung Khanh Phan - Assignment 1 - Centennial College - Summer 2020 2. MEMO. To: Company employees. From: CC: Sharon Gulshan. Date: October 14, 2020

  21. Assignment: Writing In Business: Analyzing a Memo

    Business Communication Skills for Managers. Chapter 2: Writing in Business. Search for: Assignment: Writing In Business: Analyzing a Memo. Step 1: To view this assignment, click on Assignment: Writing in Business: Analyzing a Memo. Step 2: Follow the instructions in the assignment and submit your completed assignment into the LMS.

  22. Module 3 Assignment: Written Communication

    Module 3 Assignment: Written Communication. You are a regional manager at the Walk-In Closet clothing store and you just received the most recent feedback from a mystery shopper's in-store experience report. One thing that caught your eye in this report is the mystery shopper had a hard time identifying a staff member to help them get a ...

  23. Three Trump allies charged in Wisconsin fake elector scheme

    CNN —. The Wisconsin attorney general on Tuesday filed charges against three allies of Donald Trump accused of taking part in the effort to put forth a slate of fake electors and usurp the 2020 ...