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Case Incident: BULLYING BOSSES

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among the three types of organizational justice. Bullying employees means, treating them without dignity, concern and respect. Ans. If I were the victims of workplace bullying I will try to talk with appropriate committee how can control bully. Most effective strategy would be increase higher-order needs that are satisfied internally, such as social, esteem, and self-actualization needs. By doing this it will drive me to became what I am capable of becoming. Least effective would be leaving the job. This may not be the good strategy to do because I may feel dissatisfaction in other job due to this incident. If one of colleagues were a victim I will not blame, annoy him/her. I will try to understand what level of the hierarchy that person is currently on and focus on satisfying the needs at or above that level and motivate victim as much as I can. I try to take necessary steps against bully.

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Clinical Research in Psychology

bullying bosses case study answers

European Journal of Work …

Guy Notelaers

Workplace bullying is an epidemic in the United States. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to increase understanding of employees\u27 lived experiences of bullying in an organizational culture. Schein\u27s organizational cultural model provided the conceptual framework for the study. The research question addressed how individuals who were bullied or witnessed bullying in the New York State area perceived their experiences within the organizational culture. Data collection included a researcher\u27s journal and in-depth interviews with 25 participants. Data were analyzed using Moustakas\u27s modified van Kaam method of phenomenological analysis. From the data analysis process, three categories of bullying emerged and revealed nine themes that exposed the participants\u27 experiences and perceptions of bullying and the organizational culture in the workplace. Findings indicated that witnesses and victims feel emotional, physical, and psychological effects from...

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IAEME Publication

This study is aimed to investigate the impact of workplace bullying in hampering the success of employees in media sectors. In addition, the study also examined the efficacy as a mediator, and consciousness and openness to experience as a control variable. The purpose was to see how the workplace bullying hamper the success of employees in the media sector of a developing country like Pakistan. This study is quantitative in nature and follows the positive approach due to the objective nature of the data. This study tested the suggested model in the media sector of Pakistan. We used the survey method to collect data and about 330 questionnaires were distributed and used to test the hypothesis. In this study it was found that the workplace bullying has a negative impact on employee success in the media sector. Efficacy mediates the impact of workplace bullying and career competency.

tugba karabulut

Milda (Astrauskaite) Perminiene , Guy Notelaers

The complexity of the workplace bullying phenomenon is reflected by various interpretations of its underlying factors following different theoretical approaches. However, the field of workplace bullying is lacking of a holistic view towards antecedents of the phenomenon. Individual Psychology seems to be a useful theory to explain the underlying factors of workplace bullying, because it provides insights related to dysfunctional behavior, principles for successful implementation of the work task, the impact of the social context and viewing the individual from a holistic perspective. The goal in the present manuscript is to explain the underlying factors of workplace bullying based on the Individual Psychology principles of family of origin, belonging, inferiority and superiority dynamics, social interest, lifestyle, and social context of an organization. Keywords: workplace bullying, Individual Psychology, lifestyle, conflict/problem solving, transformational leader, organizational culture

Claude Fernet , Sarah-geneviève Trépanier

Rupini Uthaya Shangar

This paper is proposed to deliver an overview of literature concerning with workplace bullying and to which extend it affects the victims and the organization development. Organization has to endure the cost pertaining to act of bullying. This paper also covers the health issues faced by the workers and the legal cost to compensate is what might increase the company’s liability. There is an extensive variety of behaviors that could be related with bullying at work, and some of these zones are highlighted. This study shows how the dominant perpetrator takes control of the victims and why it occurs. This research also shows that the number of women being sexually bullied in the workforce is very much higher than men.

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BULLYING BOSSES

“It got to where I was twitching, literally, on the way into work,” states Carrie Clark, a 52-year-old retired teacher and administrator. After enduring 10 months of repeated insults and mistreatment from her supervisor, she finally quit her job. “I had to take care of my health.”

Though many individuals recall bullies from their elementary school days, some are realizing that bullies can exist in the workplace as well. And these bullies do not just pick on the weakest in the group; rather, any subordinate in their path may fall prey to their torment, according to Dr. Gary Namie, director of the Workplace Bullying and Trauma Institute. Dr. Namie further says workplace bullies are not limited to men—women are at least as likely to be bullies. However, gender discrepancies are found in victims of bullying, as women are more likely to be targets.

What motivates a boss to be a bully? Dr. Harvey Hornstein, a retired professor from Teachers College at Columbia University, suggests that supervisors may use bullying as a means to subdue a subordinate that poses a threat to the supervisor’s status. Additionally, supervisors may bully individuals to vent frustrations. Many times, however, the sheer desire to wield power may be the primary reason for bullying.

What is the impact of bullying on employee motivation and behavior? Surprisingly, even though victims of workplace bullies may feel less motivated to go to work every day, it does not appear that they discontinue performing their required job duties. However, it does appear that victims of bullies are less motivated to perform extra-role or citizenship behaviors. Helping others, speaking positively about the organization, and going beyond the call of duty are behaviors that are reduced as a result of bullying. According to Dr. Bennett Tepper of the University of North Carolina, fear may be the reason that many workers continue to perform their job duties. And not all individuals reduce their citizenship behaviors. Some continue to engage in extra-role behaviors to make themselves look better than their colleagues.

What should you do if your boss is bullying you? Don’t necessarily expect help from coworkers. As Emelise Aleandri, an actress and producer from New York who left her job after being bullied, stated, “Some people were afraid to do anything. But others didn’t mind what was happening at all, because they wanted my job.” Moreover, according to Dr. Michelle Duffy of the University of Kentucky, coworkers often blame victims of bullying in order to resolve their guilt. “They do this by wondering whether maybe the person deserved the treatment, that he or she has been annoying, or lazy, they did something to earn it,” states Dr. Duffy. One example of an employee who observed this phenomenon firsthand is Sherry Hamby, who was frequently verbally abused by her boss and then eventually fired. She stated, “This was a man who insulted me, who insulted my family, who would lay into me while everyone else in the office just sat there and let it happen. The people in my office eventually started blaming me.”

What can a bullied employee do? Dr. Hornstein suggests that employees try to ignore the insults and respond only to the substance of the bully’s gripe. “Stick with the substance, not the process, and often it won’t escalate,” he states. Of course that is easier said than done.

  • Of the three types of organizational justice, which one does workplace bullying most closely resemble?

Answer: An argument can be made that distributive justice is at work here in that the workplace bully is attempting to influence the distribution of rewards, etc. in the workplace.  Arguments may be made for retributive justice if one is dealing with the disposition of the one engaged in the bullying behavior.

  • What aspects of motivation might workplace bullying reduce? For example, are there likely to be effects on an employee’s self-efficacy? If so, what might those effects be?

Answer: It appears that workplace bullying reduces the level of motivation exerted by individuals to go beyond a level of performance than what is minimally acceptable. It could be argued that individuals self-efficacy is diminished in that those who are victims of bullying tend to downgrade the organization that they work for, cease to engage in citizenship behavior, etc. These reactions may affect an individual’s self worth over the long run.

  • If you were a victim of workplace bullying, what steps would you take to try to reduce its occurrence? What strategies would be most effective? What strategies might be ineffective? What would you do if one of your colleagues was a victim of an abusive supervisor?

Answer: Students need to provide a strategy for dealing with this type of behavior.  It is clearly an opinion based question that has significant latitude to accommodate a wide range of responses.

  • What factors do you believe contribute to workplace bullying? Are bullies a product of the situation, or are they flawed personalities? What situations and what personality factors might contribute to the presence of bullies?

Answer: Some factors could be work history (that is emulating one’s former supervisor), a lack of appropriate management training and development, low self-esteem, insecurity, lack of adequate job knowledge.

Source:  Based on C. Benedict, “The Bullying Boss,” New York Times , June 22, 2004, p. F.1.

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Stop Making Excuses for Toxic Bosses

  • Shawn McClean,
  • Stephen H. Courtright,
  • Troy A. Smith,
  • Junhyok Yim

bullying bosses case study answers

Even if they seem remorseful, research finds their behavior is unlikely to change.

If you’ve ever worked for a toxic boss, you know how damaging it can be. So should you forgive a manager who tries to make amends for their bad behavior? A new study shows that most abusive bosses care more about their social image than actually changing how they act. Using anonymous self-reported surveys with bosses across a range of industries, the researchers asked about behaviors and motives. Based on their findings, they conclude that toxic bosses are not likely to change their ways, and they warn employees and company leaders that giving bosses a pass when they abuse employees but act nice afterwards. Doing so may end up reinforcing the cycle of mistreatment that pervades many companies.

Far too many people have worked for a boss who has bullied or belittled them. This behavior takes many forms: insulting direct reports in public, invading their privacy, or gossiping about them behind their backs. Toxic actions such as these contribute to not only employee dissatisfaction and stress, but even more harmful outcomes such as alcoholism, family conflict, and health complaints. Yet, abusive bosses continue to wreak havoc and leave destruction in their wake. Why, then, does it seem that organizations and employees put up with toxic bosses?

  • SM Shawn McClean is an assistant professor of management and McCasland Foundation Professor of American Free Enterprise at the University of Oklahoma’s Price College of Business. His research focuses on behavioral ethics, leadership, and the work-life interface.
  • SC Stephen H. Courtright is the Henry B. Tippie Professor of Management at The University of Iowa’s Tippie College of Business. His research focuses on organizational leadership, team effectiveness, and talent management.
  • TS Troy A. Smith is an assistant professor of management in the College of Business at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His research primarily explores organizational leadership, proactive behaviors, motivation, and the work-life interface.
  • JY Junhyok Yim is a Ph.D. student at Mays Business School, Texas A&M University. His research focuses on leadership, engagement, and performance management.

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Bullying Bosses – Case Study Answers

Bullying bosses.

“It got to where I was twitching, literally, on the way into work,” states Carrie Clark, a 52 year old retired teacher and administrator. After enduring 10 months of repeated insults and mistreatment from her supervisor, she finally quit the job. “I had to take care of my health.”

Although many individuals recall bullies from their elementary school days, some are realizing that bullies can exist in the workplace as well. And these bullies do not just pick on the weakest in the group; rather, any subordinate in their path may fall prey to their torment, according to Dr. Gray Namie, director of the Workplace Bulling and Trauma Institute. Dr. Namie further says workplace bullies are not limited to men—women are at least as likely to be bullies. However, gender discrepancies are found in victims of bulling, as women are more likely to be targets.

What motivates a boss to be bully? Dr. Harvey Hornstein, a retired professor that Teachers College at Columbia University, suggests that supervisors may use bulling as a mean to subdue a subordinate who poses a threat to the supervisor’s status. In addition, supervisors may bully individuals to vent frustrations. Many times, however, the sheer desire to wield power may be the primary reason for bulling.

What is the impact of bulling on employee motivation and behavior? Surprisingly, even though victims of workplace bullies may feel less motivated to go to work every day, it does not appear that they discontinue performing their required job duties. However, it does appear that victims of bullies are less motivated to perform extra-role or citizenship behaviors. Helping others, speaking positively about the organization, and going beyond the call of duty and behavior that are reduced as a result of bulling. According to Dr. Bennett Tepper of the University of Carolina, fear may be the reason that many workers continue to perform their job duties. And not all individuals reduce their citizenship behaviors. Some continue to engage in extra-role behaviors to make themselves look better then their collogues.

What should you do if your boss is bulling you? Don’t necessarily expect help from coworkers. As Emelise Aleandri, an actress and producer from New York who left her job after being bullied, stated, “Some people were afraid to do anything. But others didn’t mind what was happening at all, because they wanted my job.” Moreover, according to Dr. Michelle Duffy of the University of Kentucky, coworkers often blame victims of bulling in order to resolve their guilt. “ They do this by wondering whether maybe the person deserved the treatment, that he or she has been annoying, or lazy, they did something to earn it,” states Dr. Duffy. One example of an employee who observed this phenomenon firsthand is Sherry Hamby, who was frequently verbally abused by her boss and then eventually fired. She stated, “This was a man who insulted me, who insulted my family, who would lay into me while everyone else in the office just sat there and let it happen. The people in my office eventually started blaming me.”

What can a bullied employee do? Dr. Hornstein suggests that employees try to ignore the insult and respond only to the substance of the bully’s gripe. “Stick with substance, not the process, often it won’t escalate,” he states. Of course, that is easier said than done.

Of the three types of organizational justice, which one does workplace bulling most closely resemble?

  • What aspects of motivation might workplace bulling reduce? For example, are there likely to be effects on an employee’s self-efficacy? If so, what might those effects be?
  • If you were a victim of workplace bulling, what steps would you take to try to reduce its occurrence? What strategies would be most effective? What strategies might be ineffective? What would you do if one of your colleagues were a victim of an abusive supervisor?
  • What factors do you believe contribute to workplace bulling? Are bullies a product of the situation, or do they have flawed personalities? What situations and what personality factors might contribute to the presence of bullies?

Reference : – Seminars in HRM, Module – Motivation, Case Study, Chapter No – 6, Organizational Behavior by Stephen Robbins, Edition 13 .

Bullying Bosses – Case Study Answers – Case Summary

  • ˜A 52 years old retired teacher and administrator Carrie Clark quits job after facing 10 months of repeated insults and mistreatment from her supervisor.
  • ˜Bullying is not just for the weakest in the group, any subordinate in their path may fall prey to bullying.
  • Bullying is not only from men, women also do the same.
  • Victims of bullying are also not only men, as women are more likely to be targets.

What motivates a boss to be a bully ?

˜ Dr. Harvey Hornstein , a retired professor that Teachers College at Columbia University, suggests that supervisors may use bullying for the following reasons:

  • To subdue a subordinate who poses a threat to their status
  • To vent their frustrations
  • To fulfill sheer desire to wield power

What is the impact of bullying on employee motivation and behavior?

˜Victims may feel less motivated to go to work BUT they don’t discontinue performing their required job duties

˜Victims are less motivated towards:

  • Performing extra-role or citizenship behaviors
  • Helping others
  • Speaking positively about the organization
  • Going beyond the call of duty

˜According to Dr. Bennett Teppe r (University of Carolina):

  • Fear may be the reason that many workers continue to perform their job duties
  • Not all individuals reduce their citizenship behaviors. Some continue to engage in extra-role behaviors to make themselves look better than their colleagues

What should you do if your boss is bullying you?

  • ˜ Don’t necessarily expect help from coworkers

Emelise Aleandri, an actress and producer from New York who left her job after being bullied, stated:

“Some people were afraid to do anything. But others didn’t mind what was happening at all, because they wanted my job .”

˜ Coworkers often blame victims of bullying in order to resolve their guilt

  • Dr. Michelle Duffy of the University of Kentucky stated:
“ They do this by wondering whether maybe the person deserved the treatment, that he or she has been annoying, or lazy, they did something to earn it”

What can a bullied employee do?

˜ Dr. Hornstein suggests:

  • Employees try to ignore the insult and respond only to the substance of the bully’s gripe

“Stick with substance, not the process, often it won’t escalate” and “Of course, that is easier said than done”

Questions & Answers:

˜Question # 1:

  • ˜Work place bullying most closely resembles interactional justice.
  • Interactional justice is the degree to which an individual is treated with dignity, concern and respect.

Bullying Bosses - Case Study Answers

Question # 2:

˜ What aspects of motivation might workplace bullying reduce? For example, are there likely to be effects on an employee’s self-efficacy? If so, what might those effects be?

˜ Victims are less motivated towards:

˜ Employee’s self efficacy is affected as :

  • Quantity of work is reduced
  • Quality of work is reduced
  • Interaction with others become limited

Question #3:

˜ If you were a victim of workplace bullying , what steps would you take to try to reduce its occurrence? What strategies would be most effective? What strategies might be ineffective? What would you do if one of your colleagues were a victim of an abusive supervisor ?

˜ Effective strategies would be:

  • Stay in organization to be able to get out of that situation
  • Get evidence in the form of document/Image/audio/video
  • Produce witnesses of the incident
  • Get support from your peers (Junior/Senior)
  • Get support from Union representatives (internal/external)
  • Get legal and medical help if required
  • Take your evidence to the most appropriate authority inside the organization. If that authority is involved itself or it is biased or useless then go outside your organization for social and legal aid

˜ Ineffective strategies would be:

  • Leaving organization for running away from that situation
  • Trying not to collect evidence or collecting it in a useless or inacceptable form
  • Trying not to have any witnesses
  • Failing to get anyone’s support (inside/outside)
  • Consulting inappropriate authorities for help
  • Hesitating to go outside your organization to get social or legal aid

˜ If a colleague is a victim:

  • Advice him to collect proper evidence
  • Help him to get witnesses and include yourself if valid
  • Help him to get enough support including your own
  • Suggest him to consulting inappropriate authorities for help
  • Suggest him to go outside your organization to get social or legal aid

Also Study: Bullying in Schools

Question #4:  

What factors do you believe contribute to workplace bullying? Are bullies a product of the situation, or do they have flawed personalities? What situations and what personality factors might contribute to the presence of bullies?

˜There are a variety of reasons why a person may bully another person in the workplace. These reasons may include:

  • A person may use their position of power or their physical dominance over those who are perceived to be weaker. The bullying is often dependent upon the perceived power of the bully over their victim.

Self-Esteem

  • Bullies may put down others to boost their own self-esteem and confidence to help deal with personal feelings of inadequacy.
  • An individual or group may become targets of workplace bullying because others perceive them as being new or different.

Perceived Threat

  • Some people bully others because the other person is perceived as a threat to them personally, or a threat to their position within the company

Organizational Culture

  • The culture of a workplace is often shown by its values, beliefs and what is considered to be normal behavior. When the culture is positive it encourages individuals to adopt appropriate behaviors that promote respect of others
  • Conversely, employees may find themselves in a negative culture where inappropriate behaviors and attitudes are encouraged or condoned by management and bullying is seen as normal behavior for the majority of people in the workplace.

Bullying Bosses - Case Study Answers

Also Study: Teen Bullying

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A Case Study with an Identified Bully: Policy and Practice Implications

Bullying is a serious public health problem that may include verbal or physical injury as well as social isolation or exclusion. As a result, research is needed to establish a database for policies and interventions designed to prevent bullying and its negative effects. This paper presents a case study that contributes to the literature by describing an intervention for bullies that has implications for practice and related policies regarding bullying.

An individualized intervention for an identified bully was implemented using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model (PCSIM; Nastasi, Moore, & Varjas, 2004) with a seventh-grade middle school student. Ecological and culture-specific perspectives were used to develop and implement the intervention that included psychoeducational sessions with the student and consultation with the parent and school personnel. A mixed methods intervention design was used with the following informants: the target student, the mother of the student, a teacher and the school counselor. Qualitative data included semi-structured interviews with the parent, teacher and student, narrative classroom observations and evaluation/feedback forms filled out by the student and interventionist. Quantitative data included the following quantitative surveys (i.e., Child Self Report Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index and the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children). Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to evaluate the acceptability, integrity and efficacy of this intervention.

The process of intervention design, implementation and evaluation are described through an illustrative case study. Qualitative and quantitative findings indicated a decrease in internalizing, externalizing and bullying behaviors as reported by the teacher and the mother, and a high degree of acceptability and treatment integrity as reported by multiple stakeholders.

Conclusion:

This case study makes important contributions by describing an intervention that is targeted to specific needs of the bully by designing culture specific interventions and working with the student’s unique environmental contexts. Contributions also are made by illustrating the use of mixed methods to document acceptability, integrity and efficacy of an intervention with documented positive effects in these areas. In addition, implications for policy and practice related to the treatment of students identified as bullies and future research needs are discussed.

INTRODUCTION

Bullying is one of the most significant school problems experienced by children and adolescents and affects approximately 30% of students in U.S. public schools. 1 This included 13% as bullies, 10.6% as victims and 6.3% as bully-victims. 2 Bullying has been defined as repeated exposure to negative events within the context of an imbalanced power relationship. 3 Bullying is a serious public health problem that may include verbal or physical injury, as well as social isolation or exclusion. 3 – 4 As a result, research is needed to establish a database for interventions designed to prevent bullying and its negative effects within the context of school policies. 4

Researchers have found that bullying may have deleterious effects for both perpetrators and victims, including social, emotional, mental health and academic concerns, as well as loss of instructional time. 5 – 12 For example, a relationship has been found between bullying behavior and internalizing problems (i.e., depression and anxiety), as well as externalizing problems (i.e., aggression and hyperactivity). 11 – 12 Further, bullies have been found to have more conduct problems and less favorable views of school than their non-bullying peers, which may lead to academic disengagement. 5

Rationale for the Case Study

The purpose of this case study is to describe the implementation of an individualized psychoeducational intervention with an identified bully and to report the outcomes of the intervention in terms of acceptability, integrity and efficacy. 13 This case study was unique because we used mixed methods (i.e., both qualitative and quantitative methods) to contribute to the database on acceptability, integrity and efficacy by providing a rich description of the cultural and contextual variables that may influence the implementation and outcomes of the intervention. 14 This case study was distinctive because it used the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model (PCSIM) to design, implement, and evaluate the intervention. 15 Based on an ecological-developmental stance, PCSIM addresses individual and cultural factors related to mental health and promotes cultural competence using culturally valued resources and coping skills. 16 – 18 PCSIM uses an iterative data collection process that incorporates feedback from stakeholders to promote treatment acceptability and cultural validity, treatment integrity and efficacy. 15 The research questions were: (1) What was the nature of acceptability from the perspectives of stakeholders? (2) What was the treatment integrity of intervention implementation? (3) Was there a reduction in this student’s: (a) externalizing symptoms, (b) internalizing symptoms and (c) bullying behaviors?

Context and Informants

We conducted this study in a southeastern urban public school district with 2,484 students and 499 students at the target middle school. The population was diverse with respect to ethnicity (approximately 40% African American, 52% Caucasian, 2% Asian, 2% Hispanic and 4% multiracial) and socioeconomic status (30% free and reduced lunch). The research team had an ongoing collaborative relationship with this school district for eight years. 19 Bullying behavior was addressed in the district discipline policies, which were distributed to students at all grade levels. The school response to bullying depended on severity and could include: student participation in a conference with school personnel, assignment to alternative lunch area, partial or full day in-school suspension (ISS), out of school suspension, financial restitution for the repair of any damage, or consideration of an alternative placement for up to 10 school days.

The informants included the mother of the target student, the interventionist, a classroom teacher, the seventh-grade school counselor and the target student. The target student’s mother, Ms. S., was an African-American woman who worked in the education field. The interventionist was an African-American female doctoral-level school psychology graduate student who was certified as a school psychologist and had 10 years of classroom teaching experience. The seventh grade counselor was an African-American female masters-level school counselor who had been employed by the district for many years. Based on the tenets of PCSIM, stakeholders participated as informants by providing data to develop intervention goals and to assess intervention acceptability, integrity and efficacy. 15

Qualitative Data

All interviews were semi-structured and produced qualitative data. Interviews were conducted with the mother, teacher and the target student. Interviews were conducted with all informants prior to intervention to facilitate development of the intervention sessions. The pre-intervention student interview was audio taped, transcribed and coded for major themes. The interventionist took ethnographic notes during all other interviews. Teacher and parent interviews were conducted post-intervention to enhance outcome data. Parent interview questions included a focus on the target student’s behavior at home and school, parent concerns related to his behavior, and the results of previously employed strategies. The course instructor, which this student received the lowest conduct grade, participated in data collection (i.e., interviews, observations, and surveys). Examples of the questions from the student, teacher and parent interviews are reported in Table 1 .

Sample interview questions asked of the bullying student, his parent and teacher.

Behavioral observations

The referred student was observed in structured (classroom) and less structured settings (hallway, lunch) to determine the frequency and nature of bullying behaviors and to aid in intervention development. We used a narrative approach (i.e., rich description) for conducting behavioral observations to gain information regarding peer and teacher interactions.

Evaluation/Feedback Forms

We used qualitative student evaluation and interventionist feedback forms to gather narrative information related to intervention implementation, including acceptability and integrity of the intervention. The student feedback forms were completed at the end of each intervention session and were used to determine what the participant liked about the session, as well as what he would change about the session. The interventionist feedback form was completed following each session and provided documentation about culture-specific modifications as well as treatment acceptability and self-assessment of the interventionist’s performance.

Quantitative Measures

Behavior assessment scale for children: second edition.

The Behavior Assessment Scale for Children (BASC-2) was administered to the teacher, parent and student pre- and post-intervention. 23 These data from the student were not considered because of observations indicating that the student did not read the items carefully and, instead, provided invalid responses. The BASC-2 is a behavior rating scale that was designed to evaluate personality characteristics, emotions, self-perceptions or parent/teacher perceptions of adolescents. At-risk T-scores range from 60 to 69 while T-scores of 70 or above are considered clinically significant. This instrument has high test-retest reliability ( r = .91) and internal consistency ( α = .89). 23 We used the internalizing, externalizing and bullying scales for this case study.

Child Self Report Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index

The Child Self Report Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPTS-RI) was administered before and after the intervention to determine change in symptoms related to post-traumatic stress experienced by the target student. 20 The CPTS-RI was used to supplement information provided by the BASC-2 regarding internalizing problems. The CPTS-RI has high internal consistency ( α = .86) and test-retest reliability ( r = .84). Although the CPTS-RI does not yield standard scores, raw scores of 38 and above have been described as clinically significant in previous research. 21 , 22

Qualitative Data Analysis Procedures

The qualitative data (interviews, observations, & evaluation feedback forms) were subject to thematic analysis by having one coder read through each piece of data to create a list of themes that were reflected by these data. 24 We employed a deductive approach to coding in which the coder identified information regarding externalizing, internalizing and bullying behaviors in the data. 17 After the first coder had read through all data to generate a list of themes, a group of three coders read through all of the data again and used a consensus-based approach to confirm or modify each theme. This team also selected quotes illustrating these themes. 25

Quantitative Data Analysis Procedures

We analyzed the pre/post quantitative data (internalizing and externalizing from the BASC-2) using a two-step process that included calculation of the Reliable Change Index (RCI) and determination of whether an observed change was clinically significant. 26 – 28 We calculated the RCI based on the standard error of measurement or reliability of the instrument and the student’s pre- and post-scores for each instrument. We used the following formula based on Jacobson & Truax (RCI = X 2 − X 1 /S diff ). S diff is calculated by taking the square root of 2(S E ) 2 , where S E is the test’s standard error of measurement. 27 RCI scores of 1.96 or greater are considered to be statistically significant. Mean scores from the CPTS-RI and bullying content scales were analyzed descriptively. We did not calculate RCI scores for these two variables because standard scores are not reported for the CPTS-RI and there are insufficient data about reliability and standard error of measurement for these two instruments.

Background of the Case Study

The target student for the intervention was David, a 12-year-old African-American student in the seventh grade. David’s mother (Ms. S.) provided background and medical information. David lived with his mother and nine-year-old sister. His family history included a recent martial separation. However, regular contact with his father was maintained through weekend and extended holiday visitation. David’s medical history included a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, which was managed through medication and counseling.

Reason for referral

David was referred for the bullying intervention by members of the administrative and counseling staff and was described as a “provocative bully” by administrators and teachers. An administrator indicated that David had a tendency to “annoy” his peers verbally until they “reach[ed] their limit” and as a result became physically aggressive with him. The administrator described David’s behavior as verbal bullying. The school counselor expressed concerns about his limited ability to engage in prosocial interactions with peers and school personnel, as David appeared to “ignore the comments of adults” and seemed unaware of how his actions or remarks were perceived by peers. Ms. S. (David’s mother) expressed concern that her son was becoming verbally aggressive in reaction to being bullied at school. She cited school reports of inappropriate comments to teachers and peers as evidence of David’s verbal aggression and indicated that his bullying behaviors persisted or escalated irrespective of school and home interventions. Ms. S. and the school personnel stated that they were interested in determining the best ways to intervene.

INTERVENTION

Data obtained from interviews, surveys, review of records and observations were used to develop an individualized eight session intervention to address David’s bullying behavior. 29 Intervention sessions are described in Table 2 including the sessions, the goals, and cultural modifications that resulted in the individualization of the curriculum. 29

Sessions, goals, and cultural modifications used to individualize the curriculum.

Note. Adapted with permission of the authors.29 Please contact second author for more details regarding the curriculum.

Consistent with the PCSIM, we evaluated this case by examining both the process and the outcomes of the intervention that was implemented with a student who had been identified as a bully-victim. We answered the acceptability, integrity, and efficacy of the intervention for this case study. 15 , 30 – 32

Acceptability: Research Question 1

We defined acceptability as the extent to which stakeholders (e.g., mental health professionals, parents, teachers and students) find a particular treatment or intervention to be fair, appropriate, reasonable and consistent with their expectations of treatment. 31 We collected acceptability data through parent, facilitator, student and teacher report and used data to modify the curriculum in an effort to increase acceptability and efficacy. 15 For example, David reported in the session evaluation that activities that were less contingent upon verbal interaction were more acceptable than those that required him to discuss emotions. Through the recursive process of the PCSIM, subsequent sessions were adapted to allow for choice between various less verbally demanding tasks, such as those that allowed David to respond to the curriculum by creating artwork such as drawings or collages. 16

Examples of high acceptability also were revealed through post-intervention data obtained from all stakeholders. For example, Ms. S. indicated that she viewed the intervention as an important resource to address her son’s social deficits related to interpersonal relationships with peers and family members. David’s teacher acknowledged the value of the intervention as a reinforcement tool by informing David of her ongoing communication with the interventionist to encourage him to behave appropriately in order to have positive remarks relayed about his behavior. We also obtained measures of acceptability from the interventionist after each session, suggesting that initial sessions were less acceptable due to the resistance encountered and the slow development of rapport between the interventionist and the target student. However, treatment acceptability increased during subsequent sessions as rapport developed due to curriculum modifications made based on student feedback (i.e., less verbal input was required).

Integrity: Research Question 2

We defined integrity as the degree to which core program elements are implemented and cultural adaptations are documented. 15 This study employed a partnership model to maintain treatment integrity, by focusing on collaboration with stakeholders in order to be culturally responsive while maintaining the essential components and content of the intervention. 30 We obtained integrity data through the interventionist feedback forms to evaluate the ways in which session goals were met. Based on a thematic analysis of these forms, treatment integrity was high as session goals were met in all of the intervention sessions (meeting the threshold of greater than 80% implementation of intervention components). 31

Efficacy: Research Question 3a –Externalization

We collected qualitative and quantitative results related to David’s externalizing behaviors from the teacher and parent report. The teacher reported in an exit interview that David no longer engaged in disruptive activities after completing assignments but instead chose to read. David’s mother reported a decrease in the number of phone calls received regarding disciplinary concerns from the school during and after the intervention. There was a clinically significant difference in the teacher pre- and post-intervention BASC-2 scores reflecting reduced externalizing behaviors (RCI = − 3.74). There was no change indicated by the parent pre- and post-test BASC-2 scores on externalizing behaviors ( Table 3 ).

Pre-post scores for internalizing, externalizing and bullying.

Efficacy: Research Question 3b- Internalization

The school counselor reported that David was less withdrawn at the end of the intervention. For example, she indicated that he made eye contact and acknowledged the statements or requests of school personnel, which were skills addressed in sessions related to empathy and perspective taking. Although David’s CPTS-RI raw score of 20 did not meet the threshold of clinical significance (i.e., 38 and higher), his post-intervention score of seven suggested a lower perception of internalizing symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress after the intervention. Specifically, he indicated that he had fewer bad dreams and was better able to concentrate at school. Quantitative findings from the BASC -2 included a clinically significant decrease in Internalizing Behaviors based on Teacher report (RCI = −3.79). However, there was no change related to internalizing symptoms based on parent report.

Efficacy: Research Question 3c- Bullying

The results of the BASC-2 completed by his teacher revealed that David’s bullying behavior decreased based on pre-post test data. His score on the bullying content scale from the teacher BASC-2 decreased from the at-risk range (SS = 66) to within normal limits (SS = 59) for students his age. Ms. S. reported no change on the parent BASC-2 from pre- (SS= 62) to post-test (SS = 62) in regards to David’s bullying behavior. However, as mentioned earlier, she reported the number of discipline referrals decreased during and after the intervention. Further, qualitative findings from school personnel also suggested improvement in David’s behavior after the intervention. Additional support for positive change in this area is that there were no additional counseling or disciplinary referrals for the remainder of the school year ( Table 3 ).

This case study contributes to the literature related to intervention with bullies by providing an in-depth description of a promising intervention model and by using mixed methods resulting in evidence that this intervention had high acceptability, integrity and efficacy. 13 Using the PCSIM, this intervention successfully integrated data about the culture of bullying within the target school, as well as using knowledge gained through collaboration with parents, teachers and school personnel. 15 , 20 This psychoeducational intervention engaged multiple stakeholders, including school personnel, the mother, and the target student, to facilitate intervention acceptability and integrity and thereby increased the likelihood that the desired outcomes would be achieved. 15 , 30 Further, the use of mixed methods and multiple informants strengthened validity of the intervention and evaluation by examining findings across multiple informants and multiple sources of data. 14

An important finding in this case study was related to the efficacy of this intervention. Based on prior literature, the referral concerns and the pre-intervention data, the intervention was designed to reduce behaviors and symptoms associated with externalization, internalization, and bullying. 11 – 12 Predicted reductions in externalizing behaviors and bullying were partially confirmed with quantitative findings reflected by the RCI for externalization and clinical significance on the bullying scale from the BASC-2. 26 – 28 Additional support was provided by qualitative data from interviews and observations. Similarly, the predicted reductions for internalization were partially confirmed based on the RCI for internalization on the BASC-2 as well as by descriptive data from the CPTS-RI. These quantitative findings were confirmed by qualitative data obtained from school personnel. However, it is noted that the findings for internalizing were not supported by parent report.

The participatory approach to problem identification and intervention development incorporated in the PCSIM was successful in several ways. 15 For example, school personnel and the target student’s mother identified ongoing communication with the interventionist as a strength of the intervention. This enabled teachers to provide insight into the daily interactions of the students, the previous intervention efforts of school personnel, and an overview of the student’s social, emotional and academic strengths and challenges. Further, collaboration with the interventionist provided teachers with an opportunity to experience the target student in a different light by examining the influence of family context on the student’s behavior. This interaction between stakeholders and the interventionist exemplified the recursive nature of the PCSIM and illustrated the potential importance of mental health consultation in facilitating positive outcomes when intervening with bullies. 15 , 33

LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH

Since this case study was conducted with a single participant, more research is clearly needed to demonstrate the acceptability, integrity and effectiveness of this individualized intervention with identified bullies. In addition, given the range of findings from both the parent and teacher, future efforts should be designed to include input over time from multiple participants and to use these data for recursive revision of intervention plans. School-based (e.g., school counselors, school psychologists, school nurses) and mental health practitioners are uniquely qualified to design and implement culture-specific interventions for bullies in schools by using their relationships with stakeholders, along with ongoing data collection, to increase intervention acceptability, integrity and efficacy. 15 Future research may include a greater emphasis on systematic evaluation of the processes used to consult with educators and parents, particularly since educators and parents can have different views, while also having great potential to influence children. Based on information gained through the iterative process of the PCSIM, the intervention might be used as a method of primary prevention by extending it to younger students. 15 Further, research is needed to examine the range of ways that this intervention may need to be modified to address the characteristics of other bullies and their unique cultural and ecological circumstances. Such modifications might include multiple sessions per week, meeting with members of the target student’s peer group, and a greater focus on behavior management strategies.

POLICY AND PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

This case study has important implications for practice in the context of public policy. While the ideas discussed in this paper may have the potential to create meaningful change in some bullies, it requires intense levels of data collection and analysis to address the acceptability, integrity and efficacy of this type of intervention. This requires a public commitment to the expense needed to carry out such intervention effectively. It also may require research based on public health models that seek less expensive methods of intervention and that emphasize a full range of preventive interventions, including primary prevention. 4 In this context, it is noted that policies in place within a school, school district and/or community may play a role in strengthening intervention efforts. 4 For example, the intervention described in this paper was implemented in the context of school policies that did not tolerate bullying and that had clear guidelines for school responses to bullying. Also, schools policies of service delivery referred to as response to intervention that include a simultaneous focus on a range of services including primary prevention, risk reduction, secondary prevention and tertiary prevention. 34 Research is needed to develop an understanding about the impact of such policies on the efficacy of individualized interventions such as this.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the student, parent, and school personnel who participated in this intervention. Funding for this work was supported by the American International Group, Inc. Additional funding was provided by the Center for School Safety, School Climate, and Classroom Management and the College of Education Dean’s Office at Georgia State University.

Conflicts of Interest: By the WestJEM article submission agreement, all authors are required to disclose all affiliations, funding sources and financial or management relationships that could be perceived as potential sources of bias. The authors disclosed none.

Reprints available through open access at http://scholarship.org/uc/uciem_westjem .

Laura Martocci Ph.D.

Bullying: A Case Study Revisited

Cruelty and its impact, years later.

Posted April 9, 2015

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Several years ago, a teacher shared a scenario that exemplified how crafty and insidious bullying can be. I blogged about it at the time and reprinted the story here—as well as a followed up with the young victim:

From the outside, the abuse looked innocuous enough—kids around a table in the cafeteria, singing fragments of popular songs and laughing . Nothing to catch the attention of monitors—until another student bade a young teacher to listen carefully to the lyrics. Muse’s popular song was only tweaked, becoming "Far away / you can’t be far enough away / far away from the people who don’t care if you live or die." Instead of Lady Gaga’s lyrics, the kids chanted “you are so ugly / you are a disease. The boys don’t even want what you’re givin’ for free. No one wants your Love / Ew, yuck, ew / you’re such a joke.” Instead of Beyonce’s, “If you like it then you should’ve put a ring on it,” they sang “you’re a f*#% up and loser put a bag on it.” The repertoire was extensive, and new songs were added every week.

By and large, the students were careful to write lyrics that would pass censorship and not attract attention to themselves for profanity. They delighted in their own cleverness, and in their ability to get many uninvolved bystanders to sing a chorus as they waited in the food line. In other words, the humiliation of one girl became a popular bonding experience, and ad-libbing new lyrics was a way to get positive peer attention.

As they saw it, it was all just a joke. Ha Ha. Can’t she take a little joke?

Recently, I tracked down the victim (she is at a top-tier college) and she agreed to reflect on her experiences. I first asked whether she remembered the correct lyrics to those songs, all these years later. My mistake. I assumed the alternate lyrics were seared into her brain. Instead, she told me she had forgotten the revised songs, and would not have recalled the lyrics had I not transcribed them, years ago. When I asked whether she had ever gotten an apology , or if one would change anything now, she didn’t think there was any need.

Gratifying as it was to see her doing well, these were not the responses I anticipated. But as parents and educators think about bullying, it is important to keep in mind that not all incidents—not even all ongoing cruelties that clearly affect a young adult—will scar her for life. And that we may, at times, do a disservice to young people by rushing in to fix what we perceive as threatening, undermining their own abilities to handle it.

Our inability to gauge resilience is complicated by the fact that much cruelty lies in intersubjective nuances that are equally impossible to grasp, let alone gauge. However, much of the capacity for reparation lies in those nuances as well.

To my mind, singing cruelly revised songs (and encouraging others to sing along) was ongoing abuse, one that called for an intervention. However, "loud singing on the bus" was the only concrete issue that was ever addressed. The victim herself refused any involvement of school authorities, and—as she appears to be thriving—it seems this was the "right call" on her part. (Was it that she could not quite define herself as a victim? That she was handling her "victimization" in ways that adults could not see? That the teacher saw to it that ringleaders got in trouble for unrelated offenses? That—appearances to the contrary—she is burdened by insecurity and secret shame ?)

Interviewing this young woman prompted me to track down, and reconsider, something Clive Seale wrote almost two decades ago:

“in the ebb and flow of everyday interactions, as has been conveyed so effectively in the work of [Erving] Goffman, there exist numerous opportunities for small psychic losses, exclusions and humiliations, alternating with moments of repair and optimism . [Thomas] Scheff (1990) has sought to understand this quality of everyday interaction as consisting of cycles of shame and pride as the social bond is alternately damaged and repaired. The experience of loss and repair is, then, a daily event. In this sense “ bereavement ” (and recovery from it) describes the continual daily acknowledgement of the problem of human embodiment.” (1998)

To adults looking on, cruel song lyrics certainly seem a large "ebb" in the flow of this young student’s life—one requiring intervention. Her story, however, reminds us that as we forge ahead, looking for ways to protect our children against bullying, we must simultaneously enable them to negotiate the "ebbs" in life. A first step in this may simply involve helping them identify the "flow." This is not to lessen active response to bullying, or to sweep it under the rug, but to teach our children to challenge the negative self-narratives that form around bullying experiences. And—perhaps more importantly—to teach them that as bystanders, they contribute to the narratives of others (either implicitly or explicitly). At the risk of sounding Pollyannaish, the identification of counter-factual evidence may go far in challenging this negativity. It turns out, this is precisely what this young women was able to—though a group of friends outside the school environment, who not only raised awareness of, but contributed to, her flow.

Laura Martocci Ph.D.

Laura Martocci, Ph.D . is a Social Psychologist known for her work on bullying and shame. A former faculty member and dean at Wagner College, her current work centers around identity (re)construction and the transformative potential in change.

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8 Signs Your Boss Is a Bully

Learn How to Confront Your Bullying Boss

Why Workplace Bullying Is Harmful

How to confront your boss.

Bullying is not limited to the teen years. In fact, more and more people are reporting  bullies in the workplace. Some studies indicate that as many as 30 million American workers have been, or are now being, bullied at work. Another 30 million have witnessed it.

Workplace bullying can occur between anyone in the workplace. But perhaps the most difficult situation to deal with is bullying by a boss—the very person responsible for your advancement within the company.

Many times people do not realize that their boss is bullying them. Instead, they believe that they have a tough boss or one that simply pushes their employees to get results. But it is important to be able to identify workplace bullying because it can have significant consequences.

If you feel targeted by your boss, consider whether their behavior meets these criteria, which could indicate workplace bullying.

Impedes Your Success

Bullies do no want to see you succeed because if you do, they will lose control over you. As a result, they may punish you for mistakes that are not yours or bring up past mistakes in order to shift blame during a discussion.

They also may make it impossible for you to apply for a promotion, a transfer or additional training. They may even over-control or micromanage your work or projects. More manipulative bullies will promise you promotions or raises to get you to work extra, but then never deliver on those promises.

Intimidates You

Intimidating behavior might include threatening to fire you as a way to maintain power and control. A bullying boss might also make frightening gestures or threaten to physically harm you. Other examples of intimidating behavior include towering over you, invading your space, and giving intimidating looks.

Intrudes on Your Privacy

Some bosses spy on you or even stalk you. They may listen in on your private conversations, open your mail, or tamper with your personal belongings or your work equipment. It is not uncommon to find a bullying boss snooping through your office when you are out. Ultimately, they are looking for ammunition to use against you.

Isolates You

Bullying bosses may exclude you socially. They leave you off party lists and do not include you in company outings, sporting events, or after-hours meetings. They also may schedule meetings when they know you are on vacation or have a conflict in your schedule.

Additionally, they may make important decisions while you are out of the office. And they may go so far as refusing to allow you to attend work meetings or work lunches.

Questions Your Ability and Commitment

Bosses that bully question your ability by belittling your opinions and ideas. This behavior may take place in private or in front of others. They also may blame you for problems at work while boasting that their skills are responsible for good outcomes.

A bullying boss may also question your commitment to the job unless you work long hours and sacrifice personal time. Even then, you likely can never do enough to please them.

Spreads Rumors About You

Bullies often go to great lengths to make others look bad. As a result, they may gossip with others about your work, your appearance, your health or your personal life. Sometimes, they lie about you in order to damage your reputation. Their goal is to make others believe you deserve the unfair treatment you are receiving. 

Undermines Your Work

Bullies set unrealistic deadlines that are bound to cause failure. They also change project guidelines on a regular basis, causing extra work and increasing the chance for failure.

They withhold necessary information and sabotage your success by causing your projects to be late or incomplete. Refusing to sign off on projects or not providing needed feedback are other tactics used to undermine work.

Verbally Abuses You

Bullying bosses are notorious for humiliating employees in front of others. They might shout, swear or yell at you. They may make offensive jokes at your expense. Verbally abusive bosses also make snide remarks or offer unfair criticism.

Many times, employees will endure bullying and poor treatment from their bosses simply because they are afraid of losing their job or creating a tense situation. But letting bullying bosses get away with humiliating and demeaning you can be a bad idea, too.

Not only is the bullying bad for your health, but it likely will continue if you never address it. If you are at the point where you feel like you are walking on eggshells around your boss or you are feeling anxious, sad, or frightened around your boss, then it may be time to stand up to the bullying.

And it may actually be good for you. A 2015 study published in "Personnel Psychology " found that confronting a hostile boss helps you hold onto your sanity. The study’s lead author,  Bennett Tepper , says that employees feel better about themselves because they didn’t sit back and take the bullying.

Employees that stood up to the bullying also earned the respect of their coworkers and gained back power in the relationship with their bosses. They also were more committed to their jobs and they believed their careers were not impacted negatively by addressing the boss’ bad behaviors.

Standing up to your boss is not easy.If you feel like they are taking advantage of you, it might be worth considering. But first, think about the possible repercussions. You have to be comfortable with the fact that you could be disciplined or lose your job for standing your ground.

For some people, confronting bullying is the priority over maintaining their position in the company. Others would prefer to learn coping mechanisms while they hunt for a new job. Whatever your decision, be sure you are prepared for the possible outcome. If you do want to confront your boss, try these strategies for handling the situation effectively.

Be Confident

Bullying bosses are able to quickly discern whom they can control and manipulate. Avoid looking nervous, insecure, or defeated. No matter what happens during your discussion stay strong and remain professional. Keep your chin up and do not give in to the pressure.

Be Specific

When addressing your boss’ behavior, have specific examples ready of how they have acted unprofessionally. If you don’t have examples prepared, it will look like you are overreacting.

Keep in mind, though, that most bullying bosses will not take responsibility for their mean behavior. They are likely to shift the blame for their actions back to you or simply brush it off, saying they don't remember it happening. Recognize this for what it is and do not falsely believe that you are to blame for their choices.

Continue to Work Hard

Do not allow your boss’ bullying to derail you at work. Don’t spend time talking with other co-workers about what is happening. Instead, focus on continuing to produce high-quality work. Also, do not allow the turmoil your boss creates to cause you to fall behind on projects. Be sure to keep good documentation of all your successes.

Know When to Get Outside Help

If your boss continues to bully you despite your efforts to address it, contact human resources or your boss’ supervisor. Keep a record of all the bullying incidents, including dates, times, and witnesses. You should also keep all electronic correspondence.

If you feel emotionally drained, depressed or anxious, contact a counselor. It is never a good idea to ignore the effects of workplace bullying.

Recognize What You Can and Can't Control

Remember, you have no control over what other people say or do. But,you do have control over your response. Keep your confrontation free of emotion and anger. If you can’t speak t your boss in a calm manner, postpone the discussion.

You also need to be prepared for your boss to retaliate. Be sure you have a plan in place in case your boss fires you for calling out their mean behavior.

Stand Up for Yourself

Remember, bullies count on you being passive about their behavior. Show your boss that they made a mistake in targeting you. Address the issue with your boss in a calm and assertive manner. The goal is to defend yourself without being aggressive or mean in return.

A Word From Verywell

Learning to recognize workplace bullying will help you learn not to blame yourself for someone else’s behavior. Additionally, you will be less likely to take responsibility for something that isn’t your fault. Remember, bullying does not mean there is something wrong with you. Instead, workplace bullying is a choice that is made by the bully.

Keep the situation in perspective and do not let it affect your self-esteem or health. Find outside support for what you are experiencing and look for options for your situation whether it is reporting your boss, filing a complaint, looking for a new job, or getting outside counseling. With some effort, you can escape the clutches of a bullying boss.

Workplace Bullying Institute. 2017 Workplace Bullying Institute U.S. Workplace Bullying Survey .

Tepper BJ, Mitchell MS, Haggard D, Kwan HK, Park H. On the exchange of hostility with supervisors: an examination of self-enhancing and self-defeating perspectives . Pers Psychol . 2015;105(68)723–58. doi:10.1111/peps.12094

By Sherri Gordon Sherri Gordon, CLC is a published author, certified professional life coach, and bullying prevention expert. 

bullying bosses case study answers

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Bullying Bosses Case Study Page

This case study discusses a situation where Kara had to face bullying from her boss. Later the consequences of bullying is discussed, what effects motivation has to it and what can be done to avoid such circumstances have also being discussed along with a statistical reference to workplace bullying based on genders. In these case study we will see some cases for the employees and I will Analysis on the Merits and Problems And I will write about some of the solutions that old be used in order to face of Bullying Bosses.

1. How does workplace bullying dilate the rules of organizational Justice?

Anus: What are the organizational Justices? There are three main organizational lustiness such as Distributive Justice, Procedural Justice and International Justice. The theories of Justices are created to make the workplace an effective and a pleasant place, where everyone treated as the same fairness.

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For instance:

  • International justice concerns fairness of how individuals treat one another not only when resources are distributed but in everyday interactions, as well. However, Marketplace bullying is the opposite side of international Justice:
  • “Persistent, Offensive, abusive, intimidating or insulting behaviors, abuse of power or unfair penal sanctions which makes the recipient feel upset, threatened, humiliated or ‘alienable, which undermines their self-confidence and which may cause them to suffer stress” Based upon theories we can say that workplace bullying could be dilated by avoiding international Justice in organizations.

Bullying Bosses Case Study

2. What aspects of motivation might workplace bullying reduce? For example, are they likely to be effects on an employee’s self-efficiency? If so, what might those effects be? Do you think bullying would motivate you to retaliate?

Anus: There are many aspects of motivation that can be reduce bullying in the Marketplace. The main motivations that can be effected by bullying in the workplace are loyalty, effort, morale, and desire to work. When we have an effort to work it means that the workplace is content and there are no problems between employees.

If there is workplace bullying people will be less motivated f to work causing failure in the workplace.

When there is workplace bullying it can affect the employee’s self- efficacy. An employee with low self efficacy while being bullied can Just be affected more making the self-efficacy worsen and they can decrease their desire to work, achieve, or need to work for a higher power. When being bullied by a higher power I Mould less likely want to try to achieve more because I would not want to be around negativity and would not want to be cut down every day.

The victims may feel less motivated to go to work every day, they continue performing there required Job duties with fear, some are less motivated to perform extra-role or citizenship behaviors. Helping others, speaking positively about organization, and going beyond the call to the duty are reduced as a result to bullying.

And no I wont retaliate bullying nor will I let motivate me because I may end up looking like the perpetrator and will most certainly cause confusion for those responsible for evaluating and responding to the situation.

3. If you were a victim of workplace bullying, what steps would you take to reduce its occurrence? What strategies would be most effective? Least effective? What would you do if one of you colleagues were a victim?

Anus: If I were the victims of workplace lulling I will try to talk with appropriate committee how can control bully. Most effective strategy would be increase higher-order needs that are satisfied internally, such as social, esteem, and self-actualization needs. By doing this it will drive me to became what I am capable of becoming. Least effective would be leaving the Job.

This may not be the good strategy to do because I may feel dissatisfaction in other Job due to this incident. If one of colleagues were a victim I will not blame, annoy him/her. I Nil try to understand what level of the hierarchy that person is currently on and Ochs on satisfying the needs at or above that level and motivate victim as much as I can. I try to take necessary steps against bully.

4. What factors do you believe contribute to workplace bullying? Are bullies a product of the situations, or do they have flawed personalities? What situations and Nat personality factors might contribute to the presence of bullies?

Anus: I strongly believe in-equality and comparison are the main factors contribute to workplace bullying.

“Most of the bullies are products of situation and some of them do have flawed personalities. Employees might compare themselves to friends, neighbors, co-Markers, or colleagues in other organizations or compare their present Job with past bobs”, in-equality in power and position, these are situations contribute to the presence of bullies. Negative and stressful working environment, low self esteem are the personality factors might contribute to the presence of bullies. Lessons Learned According to Baseman, common abusive workplace behaviors are disrespecting and devaluing the individual, often through disrespectful and devaluing language or ‘rebel abuse over work and devaluation of personal life.

Harassment through micromanagement of tasks and time, overvaluation and manipulating information.

Managing by threat and intimidation stealing credit and taking unfair advantage preventing access to opportunities. Also, downgrading an employee’s capabilities to Justify downsizing impulsive destructive behavior.

According to Hole and Cooper, common abusive Marketplace behaviors are Having your opinions and views ignored withholding information which affects your performance:

  • Ewing exposed to an unmanageable workload;
  • Being given tasks with unreasonable or impossible targets or deadlines;
  • Being ordered to do work below competence; inning ignored or taking hostility when you approach;
  • Being humiliated or ridiculed in connection with your work;
  • Excessive monitoring of a person’s work;
  • Spreading gossip;
  • Having insulting or offensive remarks made about your person, your attitudes or your private life;
  • Having key areas of responsibility removed or replaced with more trivial or unpleasant tasks.

Recommendations: he organizational needs to find solve these problem for example to put roles in the company and create a fair work environment ,the employees needs to training for know who to find a good workplace and all of them share to work in safe workplace. Also the work by teamwork and effective the motivation tools will give the company good workplace, finally the organizational has to effective to deceivers the leadership and spreading the culture of total quality leadership to motive the employees to achieve the goal.

Islamic Perspective: “hat is Bullying and how does Islam view it? lulling is deliberate and hurtful behavior and can take place anywhere.

There are many forms of bullying:

  • Physical (hitting, kicking, snatching),
  • Verbal (name-calling, insulting, taunting),
  • Emotional (ignoring, spreading nasty gossip) and
  • Cyber Bullying using mobile phones, text messages, the Internet).

Islam does not tolerate any form of bullying as it is a form of oppression. Allah has mentioned many times in the Aquaria regarding His displeasure of such actions: “Allah does not like the oppressors.” O ye who believe do not defame one another, nor insult one another by sickness.” Although the focus of prevention and interventions are often on dictums of bullying, it is important to provide support to bullies as well.

As the Prophet said, “Help your brother, whether he is an oppressor or he is oppressed. The Prophet was asked: “It is right to help him if he is oppressed, but how should we help him if he is an oppressor? ” He replied: “By preventing him from oppressing others. ” From this Haiti, we learn the importance of helping those who are oppressed but, even more profoundly, he need to assist oppressors by stopping them from committing this infringement on the rights of others. Bullies are often misconstrued as people who simply take pleasure in the pain of others.

However, research has found that some are quite complex and somewhat of a mystery.

Many research studies have found that bullies are more likely to exhibit behavioral issues including aggressiveness, hyperactivity, attention deficits and conduct problems. However, contrary to what is normally considered of bullies, one research study found that they suffer from depression, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, and eating disorders to the same extent as those No were victimized by their bullying.

Thus laughing at someone, defaming, being sarcastic or bullying is not acceptable. If you see someone being bullied, do not Moore it, report it. The Prophet Muhammad said: “He who amongst you sees something evil should modify it with the help of his hand; and if he NAS not strength enough to do it, then nee should do it Witt his tongue, and it nee as not strength enough to do it, then he should from his heart, and that is the least of faith. “

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  1. Case Studies Assignment

    Case Study #1: Bullying Bosses. What aspects of motivation might workplace bullying reduce? For example, are there likely to be effects on an employee's self-efficacy? If so, what might those effects be? Bullying at work can significantly harm a worker's drive to perform effectively or show up to work.

  2. (DOC) Case Incident: BULLYING BOSSES

    Case Incident: BULLYING BOSSES. among the three types of organizational justice. Bullying employees means, treating them without dignity, concern and respect. Ans. If I were the victims of workplace bullying I will try to talk with appropriate committee how can control bully. Most effective strategy would be increase higher-order needs that are ...

  3. Solved Case Study : Bullying Bosses

    BULLYING BOSSES. "It got to where I was twitching, literally, on the way into work," states Carrie Clark, a 52-year-old retired teacher and administrator. After enduring 10 months of repeated insults and mistreatment from her supervisor, she finally quit her job. "I had to take care of my health.". Though many individuals recall bullies ...

  4. Bullying Bosses

    Questions & Answers: Question # 1: Of the three types of organizational justice, which one does workplace bulling most closely resemble? Work place bullying most closely resembles interactional justice. Interactional justice is the degree to which an individual is treated with dignity, concern and respect.

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  7. Solved ASSIGNMENT 01 PART 1 CASE STUDY: (50 marks)

    Question: ASSIGNMENT 01 PART 1 CASE STUDY: (50 marks) Bullying Bosses After a long weekend, Tangeni stared at her computer with a sick feeling in her stomach: her boss had added her as a friend on Facebook. Tangeni did not feel particularly close to her boss, nor did she like the idea of mixing her social life with her work. Still, it was her boss.

  8. How Bullying Manifests at Work

    Summary. The term workplace bullying describes a wide range of behaviors, and this complexity makes addressing it difficult and often ineffective. For example, most anti-bullying advice, from ...

  9. Stop Making Excuses for Toxic Bosses

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  10. Workplace Bullying as Experienced by Managers and How They Cope: A

    1. Introduction . Workplace bullying has been the subject of international research for several decades. This has given us a better understanding of its pervasive and detrimental effect on all levels [].In fact, bullying is now considered one of the most detrimental stressors in contemporary working life [].Bullying is defined as the "systematic mistreatment of a subordinate, a colleague, or ...

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    Bullying And Incivility ( B & I ) Bullying and incivility causes an unhealthy work environment, which affects the staff, patients, and the organization. Some of the effects on staff include burnout, anxiety, depression, increased absenteeism, poor communication, decreased moral, decreased job satisfaction, 2524 Words. 11 Pages.

  12. Solved CASE INCIDENT 2 Bullying Bosses After a long

    CASE INCIDENT 2 Bullying Bosses. After a long weekend, Kara stared at her computer with. a sick feeling in her stomach: her boss had added her as. a friend on Facebook. Kara did not feel particularly close. to her boss, nor did she like the idea of mixing her social. life with her work.

  13. Bullying Bosses

    Bullying Bosses - Case Study Answers - Case Summary. A 52 years old retired teacher and administrator Carrie Clark quits job after facing 10 months of repeated insults and mistreatment from her supervisor. Bullying is not just for the weakest in the group, any subordinate in their path may fall prey to bullying.

  14. Solved Case 1: Dealing with Workplace Bullying

    Operations Management questions and answers. Case 1: Dealing with Workplace Bullying Work-related responsibilities can be challenging for many employees, managers, and executives for numerous reasons. It is not uncommon for all of these people to face challenges in balancing personal and work-life demands, as well as extensive job demands.

  15. A Case Study with an Identified Bully: Policy and Practice Implications

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  16. Bullying Bosses Case Study by Aivan

    Bullying Bosses Case Study by Aivan - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Workplace bullying reduces employee motivation and performance. It violates organizational justice through intimidation and offenses against employee dignity, concern and respect. Bullying negatively impacts aspects of motivation like self-efficacy by ...

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    Muse's popular song was only tweaked, becoming "Far away / you can't be far enough away / far away from the people who don't care if you live or die." Instead of Lady Gaga's lyrics, the ...

  18. 8 Signs Your Boss Is a Bully

    Intimidates You. Intimidating behavior might include threatening to fire you as a way to maintain power and control. A bullying boss might also make frightening gestures or threaten to physically harm you. Other examples of intimidating behavior include towering over you, invading your space, and giving intimidating looks.

  19. Solved Read Case Study 3

    Read Case Study 3 - Dealing with Workplace Bullying and answer the 2 questions that follow Dealing with Workplace Bullying Work-related responsibilities can be challenging for many employees, managers, and executives for numerous reasons. It is not uncommon for all of these people to face challenges in balancing personal and work-life demands ...

  20. Bullying Bosses Case Study.docx

    Motivation to work, loyalty, morale or effort are the aspects of motivation that workplace bullying can affect. If someone is being bullied in their workplace, that person will feel less motivated to work or to put more effort in what they do, this would cause failure in their workplace. In cases of workplace bullying the employees self-efficacy will be affected because the employee's desire ...

  21. Bullying Bosses

    Workplace bully creates a sense of mistrust , effects the performance of the employee , increases absenteeism & turn over . Workplace bully creates a negative impression on the organization & the employee who is victim to this practice would lose trust in the organizational policies . In this case Kara was bullied by her boss .

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    Case+Incident+2_Chapter+7+Case_BUSA333 - Read online for free. This document contains a case study about workplace bullying. It discusses an incident of a teacher being bullied by her supervisor for 10 months until she quit. Workplace bullies target subordinates and are not limited to men - women can be bullies as well. Bullies may target employees to assert power or vent frustrations.

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