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How To Submit The Perfect Writing Sample In 2023 (With Examples)

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Writing samples are generally requested if you apply for a writing job. Depending on how instrumental writing is to the job, your writing sample can be a bigger factor in deciding whether or not to hire you than even your resume or cover letter . That means that you should pay at least much attention to it as your resume — if not more.

A good writing sample doesn’t just show that you write well. If you want a writing sample that’ll stand out from the others, you’ll need to make sure to match the tone, style, and quality of the writing that the employer’s looking for. If you’re looking to apply for a writing job or have had a potential employer request a writing sample, then you’re in the right place.

Key Takeaways:

A writing sample shows an example of your past written work or is written in response to a prompt given by an employer.

There are 3 types of writing samples: the portfolio writing sample, the pre-interview requested sample, and the impromptu writing sample.

When providing a sample, research the company ahead of time to make sure your sample matches their needs and tone.

Have someone proofread your samples ahead of submission.

Writing samples are usually requested during a job application, but sometimes they may be requested after an interview.

How To Submit The Perfect Writing Sample In 2022 (With Examples)

What is a writing sample?

When do employers request a writing sample, how to choose a writing sample, what if i don’t have a writing sample, writing sample tips, writing sample faq.

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Writing samples are examples of your written work. It can be either a past written work or something that you write up in response to an employer’s request. Most writing samples are either going to be submitted alongside your resume, but a number of hiring managers will request a writing sample after looking over your resume.

There are essentially three types of writing samples if you’re applying for a job:

The portfolio writing sample . Writers are well aware of this request. They’re looking for jobs writing, so they’ve taken some of their best work and pulled it together to represent their skills and style.

Whether your portfolio is online, a paper document, or you have both – these pieces should be your very best stuff. If you’re a new writer, they might be pieces you did in school. If you’re a professional, use your work that appeared in the best-known publications.

The pre-interview requested sample. This is something writers can expect to encounter quite often when they’re applying for jobs. They’ve been selected out of the applicant pool to show how they can write for the company in question.

They’ll typically be given a mock assignment and asked to do the job, or at least a part of it. This shows the hiring manager how your work would fit in with their company.

When you’re given this sort of test, research how the company writes articles or whatever sort of content you’re being asked to write. Matching the tone and style of the company is just as important as high writing quality.

Impromptu writing sample. This type of writing is less common, but it happens. It might be something you encounter if you’re not applying for a writing job, but the employer feels writing is an integral part of the job.

Employers request writing samples to gauge the quality, tone, and style of the writer to see if it fits with the necessary standard and style of their current body of work. Of the three writing sample types, two are requested well before the interview, and one is frequently completed at the interview .

During the job interview. There isn’t much you can do in preparation for an impromptu writing sample. You should have a solid foundation in language, literary comprehension, and grammar.

With the application. Some employers ask for a writing sample in the job posting. They don’t want to see your resume and cover letter without an accompanying writing sample.

As a follow-up. You may find that whether the employer requested a writing sample from the outset or not, they’ll then request a specific writing sample or a tailored sample.

At the interview. This is different than during the job interview because they’re asking you to bring something with you to the interview . Whether it’s a physical writing portfolio or something they’ve specifically asked you to complete.

As your writing sample can have a large impact on the interview process, it’s something you want to consider carefully. There are several factors to consider when selecting your writing sample. Of course you want something that showcases your ability, but you also want one that’s relevant and current.

Match the sample with the job. If at all possible, investigate what style they’re already using. If you’re going to write copy for their website, read what’s already posted and mimic that style. Hiring managers are going to be drawn to a writer that can write in the style the company uses.

Follow the employer’s directions. While this may seem self-explanatory, it requires listening to what the employer asks of you. If they request an email writing sample, give them one. If you don’t have one in your portfolio, write one.

Keep it current. While you may have a writing sample that showcases your writing skills extremely well or is published by a well-known publisher , it likely isn’t the best sample if it isn’t recent. Showing them an old writing sample makes it seem as though you haven’t kept current or kept up with your writing skills.

If you’re asked for multiple samples, you may be able to include an older piece, but make sure that your other samples are up to date.

When it’s not about research. If you’re creating a portfolio, especially an online version, it’s a great idea to show your strengths .

People with broad-based backgrounds need to bank on this and show all of their many writing styles and voices. Writers who have a niche need to highlight their skills there. So the idea is, when it’s not about research, it’s about you.

And don’t forget to be perfect. We shouldn’t have to point this out, but if you’re choosing a writing sample, you want it to be perfect – no spelling or grammar errors. There also shouldn’t be any factual errors.

The answer to this question is simple: write one. Unless the application specifies otherwise, there’s no requirement that the writing sample you submit has to be something you’ve already written.

Look at examples of the type of writing you think will be most effective, be it on the company website, social media posts, or writing examples. Then write something that you think will appeal to the hiring manager. A newly written, relevant sample is in many ways more likely to succeed than something from a portfolio.

There’s a lot that goes into a successful writing sample. You want to make sure it’s up-to-date, relevant, and a showcase of your writing skills. Then there’s the matter of making sure that there aren’t any typos or grammatical errors in it. If you want your writing sample to truly sparkle, here are some tips to help.

Keep a file of your best work. That way, you have something if the request is immediate. Timeliness matters when applying for jobs, and they might not wait a week for you to write something fresh.

Have someone else proofread your writing samples. Sometimes you are so involved in the words that you miss mistakes.

Try to tie your sample to the company’s voice, product line, industry, etc. This is where your research pays off.

Brag about your best work. By including it also.

Be current. A sample that’s ten years old is not going to go over well if you don’t have recent work as well.

Show diversity in style. While you want to customize to their requirements, it doesn’t hurt to let them know if you have some chameleon-like abilities.

Create a pdf and make it look good. A word document is one thing, but a pdf with some graphic design elements behind it can really polish your words and make them look legitimate.

Use the actual publication. If you can, submit the link to your published work. This adds tons of legitimacy and value to your work.

Lean toward the short side of things. You want them to read most of what you’re submitting. This means a 20 -page , in-depth research grant proposal is too much. How about just a sample from that document? You can always let them know that you’d be happy to send the entire document at their request. Otherwise, try to keep your samples to one page or less.

How do you start a writing sample?

To start a writing sample, research the company’s current written content. Pay attention to the tone, style, and reading level of whatever content you would be responsible for writing if hired. If you are writing a fresh sample based on a prompt, be sure to follow instructions carefully regarding word count, formatting, and topic choice.

If you are submitting a portfolio of writing samples, select the ones that best represent your ability to write for this specific employer.

For instance, if you have great writing samples for a travel magazine, but you’re applying for a financial advice website, you might want to lean towards submitting work that somewhat pertains to finance, like budgeting for a trip — even if it isn’t your highest-quality work.

Is a writing sample a cover letter?

No, a writing sample is not a cover letter. A cover letter is written specifically for a job opportunity and describes your relevant experience and interest in the position. A cover letter has two topics — you and the company.

A writing sample isn’t about you or the company (unless the prompt or employer suggestions specify otherwise). A writing sample is either an example of your past written work or a document written for the company in response to a prompt.

What do you do if you don’t have a writing sample?

If you don’t have a writing sample, write one. Although it is more work, it’s important to develop a writing portfolio. Even if your written work doesn’t land you the specific job, you’ll at least have a writing sample ready for the next job you apply for.

If the job states that you may only submit published writing samples, you can still attempt to submit a freshly written one. However, that does qualify as failure to follow instructions and is less likely to result in a job offer.

Should writing samples be sent as PDFs?

Writing samples should be sent in whatever format requested by the employer. If no format is specified, PDF is a fine option for ensuring that formatting will not change between devices. Sending your sample as a Google doc can also be convenient, as it allows for the employer to write comments directly in the file.

If you are submitting a portfolio, you can certainly create a PDF for individual samples, or stitch a few together to create one PDF. Creating a personal website is also a good idea, although it doesn’t allow you to tailor your samples for specific job opportunities.

Do you need a writing sample for a job interview?

If you’re applying for a writing job, then chances are very good that you’ll need a writing sample. However, the majority of jobs aren’t going to require a writing sample. And even if they do require a writing sample, it usually isn’t submitted during the job interview.

Yale University — Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

Duke University — Writing Sample Guide

Columbia University — Tips on Providing a Quality Writing Sample

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Kristin Kizer is an award-winning writer, television and documentary producer, and content specialist who has worked on a wide variety of written, broadcast, and electronic publications. A former writer/producer for The Discovery Channel, she is now a freelance writer and delighted to be sharing her talents and time with the wonderful Zippia audience.

Denise Bitler has 30+ years of HR experience working in various industries and with all level of employees from hourly through C-suite, as well as company Board Members.She is the founder of Resume-Interview Success, LLC and is an expert in best practices related to resume, cover letter, and Executive bio writing, LinkedIn Profile optimization, job search strategies, and interview coaching.

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Career Center

Division of student affairs, selecting and submitting writing samples.

What is a writing sample and why is it necessary?

In today’s competitive job market, applicants—even those applying to positions not related directly to writing—may be required to submit writing samples. These are primarily used to determine writing ability, show literary and grammar skills, and reflect one’s overall writing style.

What should I consider when selecting a writing sample?

  • Follow employers instructions; it is fine to ask for clarity if you are unsure.
  • If the employer does not specify, submit a sample that closely matches the subject matter or position.
  • If you have no relevant work experience (i.e., you are applying for an entry-level job), you may submit a school assignment. A lab report would work for a science-related position. An assignment from a business or technical writing class would also be appropriate.

Are certain samples inappropriate?

  • Submitting outdated samples (older than one year) is not a good idea.  Doing so communicates that you have not kept current.
  • Avoid samples that have no relevancy to your industry/expertise. For example, a creative or narrative writing sample would not be appropriate when applying to a scientific or technical position, whereas it might work well for other positions or graduate programs. Try to match your sample to the kind of writing you will be doing on the job.
  • Blogs are discouraged unless they are professional sounding and relevant to your field.
  • Avoid sending samples on political or religious topics.

What if I don’t have an appropriate, recent sample?

  • Write one! There is no rule that your writing sample must be something you wrote for work or a class.

How long should a writing sample be?

  • Samples should be concise and succinct: one to four pages are usually sufficient.  In many cases, reviewers are primarily interested in how well you convey your ideas (structure and grammatical accuracy) as opposed to content.
  • You may provide an excerpt of a longer paper, as long as the excerpt makes sense as a stand-alone document. If your sample is an excerpt of a longer work, be sure to note that on the first page.

Can I submit a sample I co-authored?

  • It is permissible to send a sample that was a collaboration between you and another person; however, it’s best to do so if collaborative efforts are a part of the position for which you are applying.
  • It is best to also include other samples where you are the sole author.

Are there any precautions I need to take when submitting samples?

  • Be sure to protect confidential information included in your documents. Change or remove names, company names, addresses, etc., to protect the identity of those referenced.
  • Edit your sample! Just because you received a good grade on a paper doesn’t mean it’s free from errors.

Start gathering samples now!

You never know when you might be asked to submit a writing sample. Consider developing a portfolio of well-written pieces so they will be accessible when needed. Choose samples that represent a full range of skills: samples of how well you summarize and convey complex ideas, research papers, editorials, articles, journals and blogs (relevant ones). You can keep a few of your best writing samples in Handshake.

Adapted from, “Tips to Get Your Writing Sample Right for a Job Application” by Margot Charmichael Lester)

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How to Create and Submit Writing Samples (Examples Included)

Creating the perfect writing sample isn't difficult, but you do need the right guidelines to get started. Here's how.

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Shreya Bose

Written by Shreya Bose , edited by Protim Bhaumik , reviewed by Eric Hauch .

27. Mar 2024 , updated 2. Jun 2024

Preview image of How to Create and Submit Writing Samples (Examples Included)

If you've written in any professional context, you know that you are known for your strong writing skills. And your skills can only be conveyed by the perfect writing sample. If you don't have a writing sample (ideally, multiple), you won't really be considered a writer, whether by readers, publishers, editors, or employers.

In this article, we'll go over the details of how to create or choose a writing sample for your portfolio. It will also drop some information on how to collate your writing samples into a professional portfolio and introduce you to a tool that makes the whole process (of building a portfolio) easier.

But first...

What is a writing sample? What does it achieve?

As the term suggests, a writing sample is literally a sample of your writing (hold on, it'll get less obvious). When applying for a writing job — journalism, marketing, PR, research, communication, etc. — employers ask for writing samples to evaluate your skills.

A writing sample is a trial run for the real job. If you're applying for a copywriter position, you'll need to send in samples of ads, websites, and UI copy you have previously written. You might also be asked to submit a fresh set of copies based on one or more topics/scenarios/prompts offered by the prospective employer or client.

You submit a writing sample to establish that you are actually as good as you claim to be and that your specific writing skills fit that specific project job or assignment.

Think of it as a trial run for your job.

How to choose a writing sample (the perfect writing sample)

Your writing sample isn't just a representation of your scribbling skills. It should also represent your level of expertise in a topic, the depth of your research, proofreading & editing skills, sense of structure, and much more. So, when deciding upon the type of writing sample to send in for a job application, it should be one that reflects the following:

Your attention to detail

Whatever your writing style, it will fail in the face of typos and punctuation errors. A good writing sample is grammatically pristine.

It's normal to be eager to send in your writing sample as soon as possible. The bristling pressure of a job search messes with everyone. But you won't even get to the job interview if your potential employer sees your otherwise great writing sample is riddled with errors.

Have someone else proofread your work before you send it in. A second pair of eyes will find mistakes you won't.

Your quintessential writing style

Whatever you showcase in your writing portfolio is what you'll have to bring to the job every day. So, make sure you put in your true writing. Don't try to replicate something to the extent that it clashes with what you're actually good at.

Don't say you can write technical blogs for developers if you've only written about the beauty industry so far. If you're willing to learn on the job, you'll have to clarify that with your employer (who may want someone with more established expertise).

Read the job posting carefully. Then create a writing sample that represents that your natural way of writing would be a perfect fit for the job in question. Don't send a research paper if you're interviewing to be a blogger and copywriter.

The depth of your expertise and research skills

Often, employers need a writing sample to gauge the writer's understanding of a topic. It's much harder to lie in writing. When applying for a job, be careful to prioritize the ones in which you have some experience and understanding.

Demonstrate that you know what you're talking about and go the extra mile to showcase your research abilities.

Your acquaintance with best practices

When you write your sample, incorporate as many of the related best practices. For example, if you're writing an article as a sample for a blogger position (or any form of online writing), use your knowledge of SEO to optimize the article's ranking value.

If you're applying for a copywriter position, send an email writing sample, some web copy, and even some ad copy. Whatever the form of the sample, take the opportunity to demonstrate that you bring the best writing practices to your piece.

Bonus Tips to craft the perfect writing sample

Pay close attention to the employer's wants.

To create a writing sample that will get you the job, pay close attention to the employers' instructions. Do they want a case study, a report, or a thought leadership article? How relevant to the industry does your writing sample have to be?

You are very unlikely to get a job by submitting a writing sample that doesn't adhere to explicit guidelines. Feel free to reach out and ask extra questions; just don't send in a piece of writing you're not sure about.

Prioritize relevance when picking a topic

Let's say the employer wants you to select a topic and send in a sample. Whether you're writing a brand new piece or sending a pre-published one, try to align the topic with the industry and company at hand. For example, if you're applying to write for the fintech industry, the topic of your sample should be closely aligned with the domain.

This also includes picking topics/samples that are up to date. Don't write about a technology that is two years old; in tech, two years equals three lifetimes.

Here's another opportunity to showcase your research skills. Dig into the latest innovations in the industry. Watch a YouTube video or two. Prove that you aren't just a writer but a thinker.

If you're sending a published piece, it should ideally not be older than 3 months (which is also a stretch).

Keep it short (if possible) and sweet (it's totally possible)

Unless you're applying for an investigative journalism role, your writing should avoid sensitive topics like politics, religion, sexuality, etc. If those topics align directly with the sample, feel free to highlight them. But in general, keep controversial topics out of your writing sample. It introduces you to your potential employer, and being perceived as a pot-stirrer only works in specific situations.

Writing Sample Examples that will wow any hiring manager

Final fantasy xvi is still final fantasy, with more blood and butts by reid mccarter.

what type of writing sample should i send with resume

Reid McCarter is a freelance writer and editor with publications in The AV Club, GQ, Kill Screen, Playboy, The Washington Post, Paste, and VICE. He co-founded and co-edits Bullet Points Monthly, SHOOTER, and Okay, Hero, and co-hosts the Bullet Points podcast.

This writing sample of his is a review of the RPG Final Fantasy XVI.

You can read the full review here and browse his freelance writing portfolio here .

How to use Canva for Non-profits by Carrie Cousins

what type of writing sample should i send with resume

Carrie has 15+ years of experience in media, design, and content marketing with brands operating across the globe. As a freelance writer, she creates content for blogs, informative articles, website or ad copy, and more.

Her freelance writing sample here is a discussion on how non-profits can use the free tool Canva for the best possible results.

Here's the full article & her freelance writing portfolio .

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg and the U.S. Military by Robert Levinson

what type of writing sample should i send with resume

Robert Levinson is a former senior defense analyst with Bloomberg Government. He covered defense spending, sequestration, international sales opportunities for military equipment, and government contracting. He is a retired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force with more than 20 years of service.

Prior to joining Bloomberg Government, Levinson worked for Booz Allen Hamilton as a strategic communications consultant and in government relations for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

He has appeared in Bloomberg Television’s Market Makers, Bloomberg Television’s Surveillance, Capitol Gains, Bloomberg News, Bloomberg Radio, NPR, Los Angeles Public Radio, Boston Public Radio, C-SPAN, MSNBC, Irish Radio, and Federal News Radio

Here's the full article and his writing portfolio .

Create a portfolio for your writing samples (make it easier to submit a sample)

Okay, so now you have your writing sample. If you're writing a new piece to apply for a job, you'll send it via GDocs, Notion, or whatever the employer prefers.

However, if you're sending published pieces (which is what most writers do), you can't just send a couple of URLs via email or some messaging platform. Well, you can. I certainly did. But you'll be damaging your perceived professionalism. Employers won't view your sense of organization and structure too positively if they just get a couple of links in their inbox.

The best practice, in this regard, is to be submitting your writing sample in a portfolio.

Whatever your style of writing, you need a portfolio. Employers expect every resume to be backed up by a portfolio of previously published writing. They do not want to get your writing sample in any other format (unless they specifically request it).

If you already have a portfolio, that's awesome. Any chance you're thinking of updating it? Stick around a second.

If you don't have a portfolio, it's time to build one. And, in order to assist you with that, may I suggest a dedicated portfolio tool that does 90% of the work for you?

Enter Authory.

When you sign up for an Authory account (for free), you get the following:

A self-updating portfolio (no need to keep adding new work manually)

Authory will AUTOMATICALLY import a copy of every bylined piece from every site into its own database. You don't have to track down links to your published work (especially older pieces). As long as you remember the URL of the site where your work exists, Authory will collate all your content for you in one dashboard.

Authory can import content from behind most soft paywalls (as long as it is a bylined piece) and some hard paywalls. However, it cannot be used to import copies of articles, podcasts, and videos you haven’t created or featured in.

Automated backups (never lose your content, ever)

All the content that Authory imports from different sources is saved permanently. Even if the original website where it's published goes defunct for any reason, you'll always have a copy safely stored on Authory's server. All backups are in the original format — text and/or media. No screenshots.

Continued importing of past and future content (less effort for a 100% updated portfolio)

Once you enter a source, Authory won't just import your existing publications. Anything you publish on the same site (after you've fed its URL into Authory) in the future will also be imported automatically. In other words, Authory will import your past and future content.

Authory also sends email notifications for every new piece it imports, so you'll always know if something you submitted has been published.

Apart from these, you also get a slew of miscellaneous but necessary features:

  • Ability to search through both your portfolio and your content database to find articles/audio/videos based on keywords . Prospective employers and hiring managers can use this to look for topics on your portfolio, and you can use it to find specific pieces within your Authory content bank.
  • Ability to create a custom domain with a click.
  • Get a custom domain and personalize your online writing portfolio even further.
  • Multiple, low-effort options for customization to make your portfolio visually appealing and easy to navigate.
  • In-built analytics that provide real numbers on content performance (engagement, readership) across the web and popular social media sites every 30 days .

Authory has been chosen by quite a few well-known names. These are people who could have picked any tool in the world. There's six-time Emmy award winner David Pogue , Steven Levy, Editor at large at WIRED , and Brian Fung, a Technology Reporter at CNN , to name a few.

Get started with Authory for free and see for yourself what works for you!

Seasoned writer & editor working with B2B & B2C content since 2017. Writes about music on weekends. Trying to overcome caffeine addiction.

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How to Submit a Writing Sample to Get a Job

Many different positions require a writing sample as part of the application process. While most common in the fields of publishing and editing, a mandatory writing sample might be also requested when applying for jobs in the legal industry or other areas that require accurate and punctual written communication. This article will show you how to submit a writing sample so you can move to the next hiring step.

How to submit a writing sample 

Here are several steps to follow when preparing to submit your writing sample: 

1. First, ask the employer what type of sample should be submitted

In a real-life job assignment, asking questions before you start working can save everyone time and frustration. Therefore, you should not hesitate to ask questions regarding the type of writing sample the employer is seeking. Find out if they want to see an email, a formal letter, or an article. You should also ask about the format they prefer for accepting submissions, such as a Word document or a PDF.

Many times, employers will leave things like tone, length, and other details up to interpretation. In general, you should submit a few paragraphs (unless requested otherwise). Consider whether they want you to express knowledge on a specific topic.

2. Second, select a topic that is relevant to the position you are applying for

If the employer does not provide you with a specific topic for your writing sample, you should do some research into the company’s existing content and work to align with their brand’s style. Choose a topic that is relevant to the industry you will be writing about. 

For instance, if you are applying for the position of editor for a bird owners magazine, you may select a writing sample that demonstrates your knowledge about a specific type of bird or the special care they require. If you are applying for the position of a paralegal at a law firm, draft a sample letter that demonstrates your ability to craft professional correspondence to clients on behalf of an attorney. 

3. Third, decide if your past work qualify 

If you happen to have a past work that is relevant to the company and representative of their brand’s style, you may be able to adapt it to fit your needs as part of your writing sample. You can even share a co-authored work, especially if you are applying for a position that requires collaborative writing skills. 

4. Fourth, draft your sample

Whether you are writing a sample from scratch or choosing an existing work, you will need to adapt the writing to suit the position you are applying for. It needs to be concise and interesting so that it piques the employer’s attention. If you are submitting a longer work as your sample, you should either summarize it into a few paragraphs or select and adapt a few paragraphs from the piece. You can then present it as an ‘excerpt,’ ‘summary of,’ or ‘adapted from’ the original piece. 

When creating a writing sample from scratch, it may be best to opt for a very specific topic. This allows you to demonstrate in-depth knowledge in fewer words compared to covering multiple topics or a general topic. 

5. Last, finalize and submit your sample

The final step before submitting your writing sample is proofreading it. It is always helpful to have a second person review your writing before submitting as they may be able to catch something that you missed. Always check for spelling, punctuation, and other essential aspects before uploading the writing sample to the employer.

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Tips on Providing a Quality Writing Sample

what type of writing sample should i send with resume

Employers may ask you to provide writing samples as part of your job or internship application. A writing sample provides an employer with an example of how you organize and express your thoughts. The purpose is to convince an employer you can create the kind of written materials and handle the type of work expected of an employee in the position. A writing sample is common for positions in media, law or research assistant roles in a variety of industries.

How to choose a writing sample

When possible use writing samples that match the type of the writing that the position would involve.

  • For journalism positions, submit “clips”—actual articles that have been published in a campus newspaper, blog, or other publication.  
  • For research positions, submit an in-depth analysis of an issue or a topic.  
  • For PR positions, submit a press release you have written from a previous internship or as the marketing chair of a campus group.  If you don’t have any, you can write a press release for an upcoming event (just make sure you specify that it has not been published).

Submit your best writing

If you do not have specific experience or relevant writing samples, a class paper from one of your courses at Columbia could work well. Here are some tips if you are deciding between two papers you have written:

  • Always choose the better written paper, even if the weaker paper is topically more relevant
  • You could also consider rewriting the relevant paper to be stronger before you submit it.
  • Remember, it’s your writing skills that the employer is assessing, and being topically relevant is just an added bonus.

Provide excerpts if your samples are long

Most employers will specify how many pages or how many clips they want. If they don’t, then submit 2-5 pages of writing, usually double-spaced (unless it is a clip).  This can be a combination of one or more writing samples.  If you want to use a paper that is longer than five pages, provide an excerpt with a notation at the top that tells the employer that it is an excerpt from a _(number)-page paper on ___(topic)___ and where in the paper this excerpt is from. You might share the introduction, sections of the body, and your conclusion, so the reader is still able to follow your thought process.

Polish your writing samples 

Proofread your document to avoid errors or typos, have a someone else review your sample as well. Make sure that you send in samples that do not have your professor’s comments. Provide clean copies of your writing and revise them as necessary. 

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Status.net

Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

By Status.net Editorial Team on November 15, 2023 — 7 minutes to read

Writing samples are pieces of your previous work that showcase your writing skills and ability to communicate effectively. They can play a crucial role in various aspects of your education and professional life, be it applying for a job, an internship, or a college program. By providing a relevant writing sample, you demonstrate your writing talent and persuade others that you’re perfect for the opportunity.

When selecting a writing sample, aim to choose one that best represents your strengths in written communication. It is typically advisable to pick a piece that is relevant to the position or designation you’re applying for.

It’s important to prioritize quality over quantity in your writing samples. Showcasing an error-free, polished piece helps to create a lasting impression and credibility. Therefore, it is advisable to thoroughly proofread and edit your writing sample before submitting it. Even if the submission guidelines don’t specify a word count or page limit, avoid submitting very long pieces, as people reviewing your application may not have ample time to read through them.

As you progress through your education or career, keep updating your writing samples with recent, relevant, and stronger pieces to reflect your improvements and growth as a writer. This will not only help you exhibit your current writing abilities but also keep you ready to seize any new opportunity that comes your way.

  • Make sure your writing sample is relevant to the job you’re applying for. Tailor the content to showcase your understanding of the industry and the tasks expected in the role.
  • Proofread your writing sample carefully. This is your chance to make a great first impression, so make sure there are no spelling or grammar mistakes.
  • Format your writing sample correctly. If a specific format or length is requested, follow these guidelines. Otherwise, use standard formatting: an easily-readable font, clear headings, and bullet points where appropriate.

Types of Writing Samples

Research papers.

Research papers are a great way to showcase your analytical and critical thinking skills, as well as your ability to conduct thorough research on a particular topic. This type of writing sample can be useful for jobs that require a deep understanding of complex concepts, such as scientific research or academic positions. Including a research paper that demonstrates your expertise in a specific field can set you apart from other candidates.

Articles and Blog Posts

Submitting articles and blog posts as writing samples is a good choice for positions in content marketing, brand development, or online journalism. Articles and blog posts should showcase your ability to engage readers while clearly presenting information on a specific topic. Choose samples that are relevant to the industry or company you are applying to, as this will help the employer see how your writing skills can benefit their organization.

Press Releases and Public Relations

Press releases and public relations materials demonstrate your ability to communicate effectively with a wide audience, making them ideal for jobs in business, media, or journalism. These writing samples show your ability to deliver news or announcements in a clear and concise manner, which can have a significant impact on a company’s reputation and success. Be sure to select samples that highlight your ability to convey the main points of a story or event in an engaging way.

Narrative and Descriptive Writing

Narrative and descriptive writing samples allow you to showcase your creative voice and storytelling abilities. This type of writing is relevant for positions that involve crafting narratives, such as advertising, scriptwriting, or creative writing. Choose samples that include vivid descriptions and engaging characters to help the reader visualize your story. Be sure to maintain a professional tone, even when writing about personal experiences or fictional situations.

Cover Letters and Resumes

Finally, your cover letter and resume can also serve as writing samples, especially when applying for jobs that emphasize communication skills. A well-written cover letter shows your ability to clearly articulate your qualifications and why you are the right candidate for the position. Similarly, a well-structured resume demonstrates your ability to organize information and present it in a clear, easy-to-read format. Take the time to customize your cover letter and resume for each job application to highlight the most relevant skills and experiences.

How to Choose Your Sample

  • When selecting a writing sample to submit, it’s important to consider the tone and style of your work. Make sure it aligns with the expectations of the audience you’re trying to reach. Think about who will be reading your sample and what they are likely looking for in a writer. Your writing should be engaging, informative, and reflect a style that is suitable for the medium.
  • As you pick your writing sample, focus on relevance, selecting a piece that showcases your abilities in the specific genre, niche, or subject matter that is relevant to the position or opportunity you’re pursuing.
  • Keep in mind the administrative aspects of submitting a writing sample, such as following submission guidelines, including word count, document format (such as PDF or Word), and any other specifics related to the requirements. Double-check your work for structure, grammar, and punctuation to ensure that your writing sample is polished and professional.

Preparing and Formatting Your Sample

Before submitting a writing sample, take time to carefully edit and polish your work. Ensure that your text is free from grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors. Check your sentence structure to make sure your ideas are clearly articulated and easy to follow. Using a style guide, like the APA or MLA style, helps maintain consistency and professionalism throughout your writing.

A well-formatted writing sample is not only easier to read but also demonstrates your attention to detail. Break up large blocks of text into smaller paragraphs, aiming for three to five sentences per paragraph. This helps your reader stay engaged with your work and digest the information more easily.

Consider using formatting tools like bullet points or bold text to emphasize your main points. This allows readers to quickly understand the main concepts you’re presenting and makes the content more engaging. However, be cautious not to overuse these tools, as it might make your writing appear cluttered and unfocused.

Proper Submission of Writing Sample

  • To start off, craft an engaging introductory paragraph that immediately captures the reader’s attention. A strong intro sets the tone for the rest of the piece and ensures the reader understands your purpose and focus.
  • Make sure your writing sample is accessible in the required file format – typically, this would be a PDF or Word document. Double-check that the formatting is consistent throughout the text, including font style and size, as well as spacing and indentation. Should there be any specific formatting requirements, be sure to adhere to those guidelines.
  • Before submitting, take the time to proofread your writing sample thoroughly for grammar and spelling errors. Correct any issues you come across to ensure a clean, polished presentation. If possible, ask a friend or colleague to review your work and provide feedback. They might catch errors that you initially missed or suggest improvements.
  • When you’re ready to submit your writing sample, carefully include it in your application or email it as an attachment, if that is the requested method. Clearly label the file with your name and the title of the piece so that recipients can easily identify your work.
  • Don’t forget to follow up once you have submitted your writing sample. If you haven’t received a response or feedback within a reasonable amount of time, it’s okay to send a polite reminder. This shows your interest and enthusiasm for the opportunity.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i create a standout writing sample for a nonprofit position.

To create a standout writing sample for a nonprofit position, focus on showcasing your passion for the organization’s mission, your understanding of the target audience, and your ability to communicate complex ideas effectively. Some tips to consider:

  • Research the organization and its mission deeply
  • Use persuasive language and storytelling techniques
  • Highlight your problem-solving and critical thinking skills
  • Address the challenges faced by the nonprofit sector and offer potential solutions

What type of writing sample should I submit for an internship?

For an internship, it’s important to submit a writing sample that demonstrates your enthusiasm for the industry and your ability to learn quickly. Some possible options include:

  • A research paper or article from a relevant class
  • An excerpt from a personal blog or previous internship project
  • A piece about a recent development in the industry

Ensure your sample is well-organized, free of errors, and demonstrates your writing abilities and critical thinking skills.

How long should my writing sample be for different applications?

The length of your writing sample will depend on the specific application requirements and position. As a general rule:

  • Academic applications: 10-20 pages
  • Professional job applications: 2-5 pages
  • Internships: 1-3 pages

Always follow any specific guidelines provided by the institution or company you are applying to. If no length is specified, aim for a concise and focused sample that showcases your abilities effectively.

What are the basic guidelines for creating a professional writing sample?

When creating a professional writing sample, consider these basic guidelines:

  • Choose a topic or prompt relevant to the job or application
  • Follow a clear structure and use headings and subheadings
  • Maintain consistent formatting and use appropriate fonts and margins
  • Edit and proofread your work to eliminate errors and ensure clarity
  • Tailor your sample to the specific company or industry
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How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide

Background Image

For most job-seekers, a good resume is what stands between a dream job and Choice D. Get your resume right, and you’ll be getting replies from every other company you apply to.

If your resume game is weak, though, you’ll end up sitting around for weeks, maybe even months, before you even get a single response.

So you’re probably wondering how you can write a resume that gets you an interview straight up.

Well, you’ve come to the right place!

In this guide, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about how to make a resume, including:

  • The 8 Essential Steps to Writing a Resume
  • 11+ Exclusive Resume Tips to Up Your Resume Game
  • 27+ Real-Life Resume Examples for Different Professions

….and more!

So, let’s dive right in.

How to Make a Resume (The Right Way!)

Before we go into detail about how you should make a resume, here’s a summary of the most important steps and tips to keep in mind:

how to write a resume

  • Choose a resume format carefully. In 99% of cases, we recommend the reverse-chronological format .
  • Add the right contact details. Leave your headshot out and make sure to include your job title , a professional email address, and any relevant links. (E.g.: your LinkedIn profile , online portfolio, personal website, etc.).
  • Write an impactful resume summary. Unless you’re an entry-level professional, always go for a resume summary. If you do it right, it’s your chance to get the hiring manager to go through the rest of your resume in detail.
  • Pay attention to your work experience section. Take your work experience section from OK-ish to exceptional by tailoring it to the job ad, making your achievements quantifiable, and using action verbs and power words.
  • Add the right skills for the job. Keep this section relevant by only including the hard and soft skills that are required for the position.
  • Keep your education short and to the point. Your most recent and highest degree is more than enough for a strong education section. You only need to add more details here if you’re a recent graduate with barely any work experience.
  • Leverage optional resume sections. Optional sections like languages, hobbies, certifications, independent projects, and others can set you apart from other candidates with similar skills and experience.
  • Include a cover letter. That’s right, cover letters matter in 2024, and the best way to supplement your resume is by adding an equally well-crafted cover letter to your job application. To make the most of it, check out our detailed guide on how to write a cover letter .

To get the most out of our tips, you can head over to the resume builder and start building your resume on the go as you read this guide.

New to resume-making? Give our ‘7 Resume Tips’ video a watch before diving into the article!

#1. Pick the Right Resume Format

Before you start filling in the contents of your resume, you have to make sure it’s going to look good. 

After all, the first thing hiring managers notice is what your resume looks like, and then they start reading it. So, this is your best chance to make a great first impression.

Start by choosing the right resume format.

There are three types of resume formats out there:

  • Reverse-chronological. This is by far the most popular resume format worldwide and, as such, it’s the best format for most job-seekers.
  • Functional. This resume format focuses more on skills than work experience. It’s a good choice if you’re just getting started with your career and have little to no experience in the field.
  • Combination. The combination resume format is a great choice for experienced job-seekers with a very diverse skill set. It’s useful if you’re applying for a role that requires expertise in several different fields and you want to show all that in your resume.

So, which one should you go for?

In 99% of cases, you want to stick to the reverse-chronological resume format . It’s the most popular format and what hiring managers expect to see. So, in the rest of this guide, we’re going to focus on teaching you how to make a reverse-chronological resume.

reverse chronological resume

Fix Your Resume’s Layout

With formatting out of the way, let’s talk about your resume’s layout , which determines the overall look of your resume. 

Does it look organized or cluttered? Is it too short or too long? Is it boring and easy to ignore, or is it reader-friendly and attention-grabbing?

Here are some of the best practices you should apply:

  • Stick to one page. You should only go for a two-page resume if you have decades of experience and you’re sure the extra space will add significant value. Hiring managers in big companies get hundreds of applications per job opening. They’re not going to spend their valuable time reading your life story!
  • Add clear section headings. Pick a heading and use it for all the section headers so the hiring manager can easily navigate through your resume.
  • Adjust the margins. Without the right amount of white space, your resume will end up looking overcrowded with information. Set your margins to one inch on all sides so your text fits just right on the page.
  • Choose a professional font. We’d recommend sticking to a font that’s professional but not overused. For example, Ubuntu, Roboto, or Overpass. Avoid Times New Roman, and never use Comic Sans.
  • Set the correct font size. As a rule of thumb, go for 11-12 pt for normal text and 14-16 pt for section titles.
  • Use a PDF file. Always save your resume as a PDF file, unless the employer specifically requests otherwise. Word files are popular, but there’s a good chance they’ll mess up your resume’s formatting.

Another thing you need to consider in terms of your resume’s layout is whether you’re going for a traditional-looking resume template or something a bit more modern :

traditional vs modern resume

If you’re pursuing a career in a more traditional industry, like law , banking , or finance , you might want to stick to the first.

But if you’re applying to a tech company where imagination and innovation are valued, you can pick a more creative resume template .

Want to Save Time? Use a (Free) Resume Template

Anyone who’s ever tried creating a resume from scratch knows how boring the formatting can be.

Before you can even start filling in the contents, you need to tweak the margins, adjust font sizes, and make sure everything fits into one page while still looking good.

What if you could skip past all that and still create a compelling resume?

Try one of our free resume templates . They’re pre-formatted, so all you have to do is fill in the contents.

They’re also created in collaboration with recruiters from around the globe, ensuring that the templates are visually appealing and ATS-friendly!

See for yourself how one of our templates compares to a resume created in a standard text editor:

novoresume vs text editor

#2. Add Your Contact Information

Now that we’ve got all the formatting out of the way, let’s get into what your resume is all about— the information you put on it .

The first thing you want to do when filling out the contents of your resume is to add your contact information .

This section is pretty straightforward but crucial. Your contact details belong at the top of your resume in a designated resume header , so the hiring manager can easily find them.

Even if everything else about your resume is perfect, that all flops if you misspell your email address or have a typo in your phone number. If the hiring manager can’t contact you, it’s a missed opportunity.

So, double-check, and even triple-check your contact information section and make sure everything is factually correct and up-to-date.

Must-Have Information

  • Full name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top of your resume.
  • Email address. Stick to an address that’s professional and easy to spell, like a combination of your first and last name. (E.g.: [email protected])
  • Phone number. Add a reliable number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country. If you plan to relocate for the job or want a remote position, specify it on your resume.

Optional Information

  • Job title. Add your professional title underneath. Write it down word for word, whether it’s “Digital Marketing Specialist” or “Junior Data Scientist.” Just don’t make up job titles like “Marketing Wizzard” or “Data Manipulator.” They’re not quirky; they’re just unprofessional. 
  • LinkedIn profile . We recommend that you include a link to your updated LinkedIn profile since over 77% of hiring managers use the platform when evaluating a candidate. 
  • Relevant links. Include links to personal websites or any social media profiles that are relevant to your field. For example, a developer could include a Github profile, while a graphic designer could link their Behance or Driblle account, and so on.
  • Date of birth. Unless this is specifically required in the job ad, the hiring manager doesn’t need to know how old you are. It’s not important for their decision-making, and at worst, it might lead to age-based discrimination.
  • Unprofessional email address. Your quirky, old high school email address doesn’t belong on your resume. Instead of [email protected] , go for a [email protected] type of address.
  • Headshot. (USA, UK or Ireland) Depending on the country where you’re applying, it might even be illegal to include a picture of yourself on your resume . While it’s the norm to include a picture in most of Europe and Asia, always check the regulations for each specific country or industry you’re applying to.

All clear? Good! Now, let’s look at what a great example of a resume's contact information section looks like:

professional resume contact section

#3. Write a Resume Headline (Summary or Objective)

It's no secret that recruiters spend an average of less than seven seconds on a resume .

When you receive hundreds, if not thousands, of applications daily, it's physically impossible to spend too much time on each.

So, what the hiring managers do to go through resumes more effectively is to skim through each resume and read it in depth only if it piques their interest.

This is where the resume headline comes in.

Placed right next to (or underneath) your contact information, this brief paragraph is the first thing the hiring manager is going to read on your resume.

Now, depending on how far along in your career you are, your resume headline can be either a resume summary or a resume objective.

resume summary professional

So, how do you choose between a resume summary and a resume objective? Here’s all you need to know:

Resume Summary

A resume summary, as the name suggests, is a two to three-sentence summary of your career so far. If done right, it shows that you’re a qualified candidate at a glance and gets the hiring manager to give you a chance.

Here’s what your resume summary should include:

  • Your job title and years of experience.
  • A couple of your greatest professional achievements or core responsibilities.
  • Your most relevant skills for the job.

Here’s an example of a well-written resume summary: 

Experienced Java Developer with 5 years of experience in building scalable and efficient applications. Contributed to a major project that enhanced application performance by 25%. Strong background in Spring Framework and microservices. Aiming to apply robust coding skills to develop innovative software solutions at XYZ Tech Solutions.

Unless you’re a recent graduate or amid a career change, we recommend you stick to a resume summary. Otherwise, a resume objective might be a better option for you.

Resume Objective

A resume objective is supposed to express your professional goals and aspirations, academic background, and any relevant skills you may have for the job.

It communicates your motivation for getting into a new field, so it’s the go-to headline for recent graduates and those going through a career change. As with a resume summary, a resume objective should be brief—around two to four sentences long.

So, here’s what it would look like if you’re a student:

Hard-working recent graduate with a B.A. in Graphic Design from New York State University seeking new opportunities. 3+ years of practical experience working with Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, creating illustrations and UX/UI design projects. Looking to grow as a designer and perfect my art at XYZ Design Studio.

Or, on the other hand, if you’re going through a career change, it might look more like this:

IT project manager with 5+ years of experience in software development. Managed a team of developers to create products for several industries, such as FinTech and HR tech. Looking to leverage my experience in managing outsourced products as a Product Owner at Company XYZ.

#4. Prioritize Your Work Experience

The most important part of your resume is your work experience.

This is where you get to sell yourself and show off your previous accomplishments and responsibilities.

If you manage to master this section, you’ll know most of what’s there to know about how to make a resume.

There are plenty of good practices for writing your work experience . But before we dive into all the nits and grits, let's start with the basics.

The standard format for each work experience entry is as follows:

  • Job title/position. Your job title goes on top of each work experience entry. When the hiring manager looks at your resume, you want them to know, at a glance, that you have relevant work experience for the job.
  • Company name/location/description. Mention the name of the employer and the general location, such as the city and state/country where you worked. In some cases, you may also want to briefly describe the company, like when the organization isn’t particularly well-known.
  • Dates employed. Add the approximate timeframe of your employment at each company. You don’t need to give exact dates since the standard format for this is mm/yyyy.
  • Achievements and responsibilities. This is the core of each work experience entry. Depending on your field, you want to list either your achievements or responsibilities. List them in bullet points instead of paragraphs, so they’ll be easier to read.

Here’s a real-life example:

how to list work experience on a resume

Your work experience entries should always be listed in reverse chronological order , starting with your most recent job and working your way back into the past.

Now that you know how to list your experience, we’re going to show you how to write about it in a way that makes you stand out from the competition, starting with: 

Are you a student with no work experience? We’ve got you covered. Check out our guide to writing a resume with no experience here.

Focus on Achievements Whenever Possible

One of the most common resume mistakes is only listing responsibilities in your work experience section.

Here’s the thing—in most cases, the hiring manager knows exactly what your job responsibilities are.

For example, if you’re a sales manager, your responsibilities would be:

  • Reach out to potential clients over the phone or email.
  • Maintain relationships with existing company clients and upsell relevant products.
  • Tracking and reporting on leads in CRM.

Coincidentally, this is also the same list of responsibilities for every sales manager out there. So, 90% of all other resumes probably mention the same thing.

To stand out from the competition, you want to focus on writing achievements in your resume instead. These can be how you helped your previous company grow, reach quarterly quotas, and so on.

Let’s compare how responsibilities hold up next to achievements for the same job:

  • Exceeded sales team KPIs by 30%+ for 3 months straight.
  • Generated over $24,000 in sales in 1 month.
  • Generated leads through cold-calling
  • Managed existing company clients

Keep in mind, though, that in some fields, there just aren’t that many achievements you can mention. Let’s say you’re a warehouse worker .

Your day-to-day responsibilities probably include:

  • Loading, unloading, and setting up equipment daily.
  • Packaging finished products and getting them ready for shipping.
  • Assisting in opening and closing the warehouse.

In fields like this, it’s pretty hard to distinguish yourself through achievements, so it’s okay to stick to responsibilities instead. You can still make them shine by following the rest of our advice about listing your work experience.

Keep in mind, though, that in some fields, there aren’t that many achievements you can mention. Let’s say you work in a warehouse. Your day-to-day responsibilities probably involve:

  • Loading, unloading and setting up equipment on a daily basis.
  • Package finished product and get it ready for shipping.
  • Assist in opening and closing the warehouse.

In such fields, it’s pretty hard to distinguish yourself, so it’s totally OK to stick to responsibilities instead.

Tailor Your Resume to the Job

Tailoring is what sets an amazing resume apart from an okay one.

Hiring managers don’t need to know about every single job you’ve ever worked at or every single skill that you have.

They only want to know about your jobs, experiences, or skills that are relevant to the role you’re applying for.

For example, if you’re applying for a job doing Google Ads, you don’t need to talk about your SEO internship from eight years ago.

By focusing your resume on whatever is important for the specific role, you’re a lot more likely to stand out and catch the hiring manager’s attention.

Let’s take a look at an example of a job ad:

how to tailor your resume to the job ad

As you can see, we’ve highlighted the most important requirements.

To tailor your resume accordingly, you just need to mention how you meet each of these requirements in your resume.

You can highlight your relevant achievements and qualifications in different parts of your resume, such as:

  • In your resume summary, where you should recap your years of experience.
  • Throughout your work experience section, where you should list achievements and responsibilities that reflect your social media marketing experience.
  • In your education section, where you can let the hiring manager know you have the degree that they’re looking for.

Include the Right Amount of Work Experience

If you’ve got over a decade’s worth of work experience, you’re probably wondering whether all of it belongs on your resume. In most cases, you’d end up writing a novel if you listed everything you’ve ever done, and that’s not how long a resume should be .

If you’re new to the job market, on the other hand, you probably don’t have any experience, and you’re wondering what you could even add to this section.

So, here’s how much information your resume should include, depending on your level of experience:

  • No experience. If you’re looking for your first job , you won’t have any work experience to fill this section with. So, you can either keep it empty and focus on all the other sections or fill it up with any experience gained in student organizations, extracurricular activities, volunteering, and other projects.
  • Entry-level. List all your work experience so far. While some of it won’t be relevant, it can still show the hiring manager that you do have some actual work experience.
  • Mid-level. Only mention relevant work experience to the position you’re applying for. There’s no need to waste space on jobs that aren’t related to what you’re after.
  • Senior-level. List up to 15 years of relevant work experience, tops. If your most recent experience is as a marketing executive , the hiring manager doesn’t care how you started your career as a junior marketing specialist 23 years ago.

Consider Applicant Tracking System (ATS) Software

Did you know that over 70% of resumes don’t even make it to the hiring manager ?

Most companies these days use ATS to evaluate hundreds of resumes instantaneously and automatically filter out the ones that don’t meet their criteria.

For example, if a resume doesn’t mention a specific skill or isn’t formatted correctly, the ATS will automatically reject it.

ats system statistic

Fortunately, there are some easy ways to make an ATS-friendly resume .

Here are a couple of tips to help you get past those pesky robots:

  • Stick to one page. Sometimes employers set a limit on how long a resume should be. This means that if your resume is longer than one page, it might get automatically disqualified.
  • Incorporate keywords. Tailoring your resume to the job helps a ton with beating the ATS. Just carefully read the job description to find hints for what the ATS will be looking for. Then, whenever you find keywords related to your responsibilities and achievements, make sure to include them in your work experience section.
  • Use an active voice. Passive voice is too vague and unclear, so make sure to use active voice as much as possible when describing your previous jobs. (E.g.: “Managed a team of ten people,” instead of “ A team of ten people was managed by me.” )
  • Leverage powerful action words. Instead of starting each of your sentences with “was responsible for," make your work experience impactful by using words that can grab attention. Saying that you “spearheaded” or “facilitated” something sounds a lot more impressive than “helped.”

Want to make sure your resume formatting passes the ATS test? Choose one of our tried and tested ATS-friendly resume templates , and you’ll be good to go! 

#5. List Your Education

The next section on your resume is dedicated to your academic qualifications. Let’s start with the basics!

Here’s how you should format the education section on your resume :

  • Program Name. Your major and degree type should be listed. (E.g.: “B.A. in Business Administration” )
  • University Name. Add the name of the institution. (E.g.: “New York State University” )
  • Dates Attended. Use a mm/yyyy format for the dates you attended. (E.g.: “08/2008 - 06/2012” )
  • Location. If your university is less well-known, you can also add the location. (E.g.: “Stockholm, Sweden” )
  • GPA. Use the appropriate grading system for the country you’re applying to work in. (E.g.: In the USA, it would be “3.9 GPA” )
  • Honors. Add any honors and distinctions you’ve been given. (E.g.: Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude )
  • Achievements. You can mention interesting papers you’ve written, projects you’ve done, or relevant coursework you’ve excelled in.
  • Minor. “Minor in Psychology”

Pretty simple, right? Now let’s see what an education section looks like in practice:

education on resume

This example includes all the necessary information, plus an eye-catching award and relevant classes this candidate has taken.

Resume Education Tips

Now that you know how to list your education on your resume, let’s take this section to the next level.

Just follow these expert tips:

  • If you’re making a resume as a student and don’t have any work experience yet, you can list your education section at the beginning of the page instead of work experience.
  • You can add your expected graduation date if you’re still pursuing your degree.
  • If you already have relevant work experience, just keep this section short and sweet. Recent graduates can expand on their education more and add optional information like projects, classes, academic achievements, etc.
  • Always list your degrees in reverse chronological order, starting with your highest degree on top. Your highest and most recent degree is usually enough, so if you have a Master’s degree that’s relevant to the job, there’s no need to mention your earlier degrees.
  • Don’t add your high school degree to your resume if you already have a university degree. It doesn’t have as much weight, and you can use the space for something else.
  • Only mention your GPA if you had an impressive academic career. Anything below a 3.5 GPA doesn’t need to be on your resume.

Are you in the process of applying for college? Check out our guide to writing a college application resume to wow that admissions officer!

#6. Emphasize Your Know-How in the Skills Section

After your work experience, your skills are the first thing the hiring manager is going to look for. In fact, together, work experience and skills make up 90% of the hiring decision .

So, this is the place where you want to mention all the know-how that makes you the perfect candidate for the job.

There are two types of skills you can include when writing your resume:

  • Hard Skills. These are measurable abilities. What you can list here can be anything from coding in Python to knowing how to cook Thai cuisine.
  • Soft Skills. Also known as personal skills, these are a mix of communication skills , personal traits, career attributes, and more. They can include leadership, critical thinking, and time management , just to name a few.

Your resume should always cover both hard skills and soft skills . Here’s an example in action:

How to List Skills in Your Resume

Now, let’s discuss how you should list your most important skills on your resume.

There are a few essential steps you need to follow:

Always List Hard and Soft Skills Separately

Your resume should be easy and neat to navigate. The hiring manager shouldn’t have to waste time looking for a specific skill because you didn’t separate it into the appropriate subsection.

So, just create separate categories for your hard and soft skills.

Depending on your field, you could customize the name of your “hard skills” subsection to something like “technical skills," “marketing skills," or something else related to your field.

Let’s look at an example of what skills look like on a project manager’s resume :

Methodologies & Tools

  • Agile Methodology
  • SCRUM Framework
  • Waterfall Project Management
  • Microsoft Project
  • Critical Path Method (CPM)
  • Earned Value Management (EVM)
  • Risk Management

Soft Skills

  • Team Management
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Negotiation

Tailor Your Skills to the Job

You might have some awesome skills, but the hiring manager only needs to know about the ones that are relevant to the job.

For example, if you’re applying for a job as an accountant, your gourmet chef skills shouldn’t be on your resume.

Look at the job ad and list at least two to three essential skills you have that are required for the role. Remember—there’s no need to list every skill you have here; just keep it relevant.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree or higher in Graphic Design or a related field.
  • Tech-savvy, with some background in CMS systems such as WordPress.
  • Thrives in a stressful environment and juggles multiple tasks and deadlines.
  • Strong organizational and time management skills.
  • Excellent communication skills.
  • Self-reliant, with the ability to manage their own work.
  • A can-do attitude and an outside-the-box thinker.
  • Proficient in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Keynote, and Pages.
  • Basic understanding of Office software such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook.

So, the must-have hard skills here are Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Keynote, and Pages. Other good computer skills to have are WordPress or similar CMS systems.

While you can also mention Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, it’s pretty much assumed that you know how to use them since they’re required for most office jobs.

List Hard Skills with Experience Levels

For each hard skill you list on your resume, you should also mention your proficiency level. This tells employers what they can expect from you and how much training you might need.

  • Beginner. You have some experience with the skill, whether it’s from some entry-level practice or classroom education.
  • Intermediate. You’ve used the skill in a work environment with good understanding.
  • Advanced. You’re the go-to person for this skill in your office. You can coach other employees, and you understand the skill at a high level.
  • Expert. You’ve applied this skill to more than a handful of different projects and organizations. You’re the go-to person for advice about the skill, not just in your office but even amongst some of the best professionals in your field.

Just make sure to never lie about your actual skill level. Even if you get the job, once you need those skills you exaggerated, it will be pretty awkward for both you and your employer.

Include Transferable Skills

These are the types of skills that are useful for almost any job out there.

Transferable skills can be both soft skills (e.g.: teamwork, creativity, problem-solving skills, and others) and hard skills (MS Office Suite, HTML, writing, etc.)

Whatever job you’re applying to, chances are you have transferable skills from your experience that can come in handy one way or another. So, feel free to include them, even if they’re not specifically required for the position.

Not sure which skills to mention on your resume for your specific field? Check out our list of 101+ essential skills for inspiration!

#7. Leverage Optional Resume Sections

The sections we’ve covered so far are must-haves for any resume. They’re the bread-and-butter for any job application, and if you get them right, you’ll land any job you apply to.

But if you have some leftover space, there are a few optional sections you can choose from to give your resume a boost!

other important resume sections

Are you bi-lingual? Or even better  – multi-lingual? You should always mention that on your resume!

Even if the position doesn’t require you to know a specific language, it can still come in handy at some point. At the end of the day, it’s always better to know more languages than less.

To list languages in your resume , just write them down and assign them the appropriate level:

  • Intermediate

You can also use the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) or the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scales.

As a given, you should never lie about your language skills. You never know—your interviewer might turn out to be fluent in the language or even be a native speaker!

Hobbies and Interests

If you want to spice up your resume, hobbies and interests could be just what you need.

While this section isn’t a game-changer, it can help the hiring manager see who you are as an individual.

For example, if you listed “teamwork” as one of your skills, hobbies like team sports can back up your claim.

And who knows? Maybe you and your interviewer have some hobbies or interests in common!

Volunteering Experience

If you’re the type of person who devotes their free time to helping others while expecting nothing in return, chances are that you’re the type of employee who’s in it for more than just the money. 

Seeing volunteer experience on your resume tells hiring managers that you’re a loyal employee who’s after something meaningful.

Several studies show that listing your volunteer experience can boost your chances of getting hired, especially if you have little to no work experience.

Certifications

Hiring managers love candidates who invest in themselves, and that’s exactly what they see when you list certifications on your resume .

If you value continuous learning and strive to expand your skill set, that’s always a plus.

Certifications can also show employers how much expertise you have.

For example, if you’re a Microsoft Cloud Engineer and you specialize in Microsoft Technologies, you should definitely include all essential certifications on your resume, such as the Azure Solutions Architect Expert one.

Awards and Recognitions

There’s no harm in showing off a little on your resume. After all, you want to be a candidate that shines above the rest.

So, if you’ve received any awards or recognitions that make you stand out in your field, make sure to add them.

For example, if you’ve been recognized for your contributions to data science or received a hard-to-come-by scholarship , mention it in your resume. Just keep your entries here relevant to the field you’re applying to.

Publications

Whether you’re a freelance writer or a distinguished academic, publications are always impressive.

If you have any published works (online or in an academic journal), you can add them to your resume. Just make sure to include a link so the hiring manager knows where to check your work!

Are you looking for a career in academia? Check out our guide to writing the perfect academic CV to get started!

Working on side projects can show off your passion for your field. Whether they’re university class projects or part-time entrepreneurial endeavors, they’re relevant.

For example, if you worked on a mock software product as part of a university competition, it shows you went through every step of product creation, from ideation to creating a marketing strategy.

This project also shows off your organizational skills , and if you mention it in your resume, you stand a better chance of landing the job you had your sights set on.

But projects can also be personal, not academic. For example, you might manage an Etsy store where you sell hand-made arts and crafts to customers online. This is a great opportunity to highlight your creativity, management, and customer service skills .

Overall, hiring managers love employees who do cool work in their free time, so projects are always a great section to add to your resume.

Looking to kickstart your career? Check out our guide on how to get an internship for useful tips and real-life examples!

Extracurricular Activities

Every college freshman knows that extracurricular experience can make a difference in their application.

Especially if you don’t have a lot of experience outside of school, extracurricular activities are a great way to show potential employers your skills and give them insight into you as a person. Different clubs and after-school projects can help you gain real-life skills and considerably increase your chances of landing your first job after college.

For example, joining a student government organization can hone your leadership skills and teach you how to work as part of a team.

For example, if you’re part of a student government or public speaking club, these activities can help you hone your leadership and presentation skills.

11+ Expert Resume Tips

You’ve got the gist of how to make a resume. Now, it’s time to make it really stand out from the crowd!

Follow these exclusive resume tips to take your resume game to the next level:

  • Match the professional title underneath your name to the job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Mention any promotions from your previous jobs. Use the work experience entries for them to focus on the achievements that helped you earn them.
  • Describe your achievements using Laszlo Bock’s formula : accomplished X as measured by Y by doing Z . This way, your work experience can go the extra mile and show the hiring manager what you can bring to the table.
  • Always list your achievements and responsibilities in concise bullet points. This makes your resume more reader-friendly, and it’s more likely that the hiring manager will see your impressive achievements at a glance.
  • Don’t use personal pronouns like “I” or “me,” and don’t refer to yourself by name. Stick to a slightly altered third person, like “managed data integrity at XYZ Inc.” instead of “he managed data integrity at XYZ Inc.”
  • Name your resume sections correctly, or it might get rejected by the ATS. Swapping out quirky names like “career history” or “expertise” for “work experience” and "skills" makes it easier for the hiring manager to find what they’re looking for, too.
  • Prioritize important keywords instead of adding all of them. Make sure the relevant skills, qualifications, and experiences you add all make sense in context, too. Your goal is to get past the ATS and impress the hiring manager.
  • Focus on transferable skills if you don’t have a lot of relevant work experience. Any extracurricular activities or personal projects can help you stand out here.
  • Add a strategic pop of color to headings, bullet points, or key elements you want to highlight. It can help your resume stand out, but don’t overdo it—you want the information to be more impressive than the color palette.
  • Don’t include the line “references available upon request.” Hiring managers already know they can request a list of references from you, so there’s no need to waste valuable space on it.
  • Make sure your resume is optimized for mobile viewing. Most hiring managers use their mobile phones as often as desktop computers, so save your resume to a PDF file and make sure your formatting stays intact across any device.
  • Rename the resume file you plan to send so it includes your name and the name of the position you’re applying for. It’s a small detail that can turn into a crucial mistake if you forget it.
  • Read your resume out loud when you’re done. This is a great way to catch awkward phrases or spelling mistakes you might have missed otherwise.
  • Use a tool like DocSend to track your resume. You’ll get a notification any time someone opens your resume, and you can see how long they spend reading it.

FREE Resume Checklist

Are you already done with your resume? Let’s see how it holds up!

Go through our checklist for perfecting your resume and see where you stand!

professional resume writing checklist

If you missed some points, just go through your resume one more time and perfect it.

And if you ☑’d everything—congrats! You’ve learned all there is to know about writing a resume, and you’re good to go with your job search.

Need to write a CV instead of a resume? Check out our step-by-step guide on how to write a CV with dozens of examples!

9 Resume Templates for Different Industries

Looking to create an effective resume without dealing with the formatting hassle? Just choose one of the templates below.

#1. Traditional Resume Template

Traditional Resume Template

Good for traditional industries like finance, banking, law, and manufacturing.

#2. Modern Resume Template

Modern Resume Template

Good for both contemporary and forward-looking industries, including entrepreneurship, medical technology, and engineering.

#3. Creative Resume Template

Creative Resume Template

Good for creative industries, including entertainment, design, and architecture. 

#4. Minimalistic Resume Template

Minimalistic Resume Template

Good for experienced professionals in basically any industry who want to let their achievements do the talking. 

#5. IT Resume Template

IT Resume Template

Good for any IT-related profession like software development, cyber security, and DevOps engineering.

#6. Tech Resume Template

Tech Resume Template

Good for the tech industry and everything it encompasses.

#7. College Resume Template

College Resume Template

Good for college students and recent graduates alike.

#8. General Resume Template

General Resume Template

Good for multiple industries, including HR, education, and customer service.

#9. Executive Resume Template

Executive Resume Template

Good for senior professionals across different industries, including hospitality, marketing, and logistics.

17+ Resumes for Different Jobs

Knowing how to write a resume is one thing, but making a resume that stands out is something entirely different. Without inspiration, even top career experts might stumble on a roadblock or two.

Check out the following effective resume examples for specific jobs to get a better sense of what a good resume looks like:

#1. Nurse Practitioner Resume Example

Nurse Practitioner Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a nurse resume here.

#2. Data Scientist Resume Example

Data Scientist Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a data scientist resume here.

#3. Business Analyst Resume Example

Business Analyst Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business analyst resume here.

#4. Digital Marketing Resume Example

Digital Marketing Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a digital marketing resume here.

#5. Software Engineer Resume Example

Software Engineer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a software engineer resume here.

#6. Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a construction project manager resume here.

#7. Customer Service Resume Example

Customer Service Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a customer service resume here.

#8. High School Resume Example

High School Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a high school resume here.

#9. Student Resume Example

Student Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a student resume here.

#10. Server Resume Example

Server Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a server resume here.

#11. Actor Resume Example

Actor Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an actor resume here.

#12. Web Developer Resume Example

Web Developer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a web developer resume here.

#13. Engineering Resume Example

Engineering Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineering resume here.

#14. Computer Science Resume Example

Computer Science Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a computer science resume here.

#15. Architect Resume Example 

Architect Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a data analyst resume here.

#17. Remote Job Resume Example

Remote Job Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a remote job resume here.

#18. Sales Associate Resume Example

Sales Associate Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales associate resume here.

#19. Receptionist Resume Example

Receptionist Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist resume here.

Want to see more examples? Check out our compilation of 80+ resume examples for different fields .

  • Administrative Assistant Resume
  • Bartender Resume
  • DevOps Engineer Resume
  • Executive Assistant Resume
  • Flight Attendant Resume
  • Graphic Designer Resume
  • Paralegal Resume
  • Pharmacist Resume
  • Recruiter Resume
  • Supervisor Resume

Next Steps After Your Resume

Now that we’ve covered everything you need to know about how to make a resume, it’s time to talk about the rest of your job application.

After all, your resume is only the first step in your job search. To land the job you deserve, you also need to write a captivating cover letter and ace that upcoming interview. Here’s how:

#1. How to Write a Convincing Cover Letter

The companion piece to every resume is the cover letter.

Most job-seekers flinch when they hear that they have to write a cover letter. What do you even mention in a cover letter, anyway? If you were good at writing cover letters, you’d be applying for a job as a writer !

In reality, though, writing a cover letter is very simple once you know its purpose.

Think of your cover letter as a direct message to the hiring manager. It’s your chance to briefly explain why you’re such an awesome fit for the position. And with a few cover letter tips to point you in the right direction, you’ll write the perfect cover letter for your job application.

Just follow this structure:

cover letter structure for resume

  • Add the contact details. Include the same contact information as on your resume, plus additional contact details for the hiring manager, including their name, job title, the company’s name, and location.
  • Introduce yourself. Start your cover letter by mentioning who you are, what your work experience is, and why you’re interested in the position. Mention a standout achievement or two, relevant skills, and what you’d like to do for the company you’re applying for.
  • Explain why you’d excel at the job. Find the requirements in the job ad that you meet, and elaborate on how you fulfill the most important ones. Research the company so you know what you like about it, and mention it in your cover letter. Make sure to convey your enthusiasm for the job and confidence that you’ll be a great fit for their team.
  • Wrap it up politely. Conclude your cover letter by recapping your key selling points and thanking the hiring manager for their time. Then add a call to action, such as “Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided phone number so that we can discuss my application in greater detail.” Then, add a closing line and follow it with your full name.

Sounds easy, right? Here’s a real-life example to drive the point home:

cover letter example for resume

Do you need more help perfecting your cover letter? Learn what the most common cover letter mistakes are and check out cover letter examples for all professions here.

#2. How to Ace Your Next Interview

Once you’ve perfected both your resume and cover letter, there’s only one thing left.

It’s time for the final step—the dreaded job interview.

Whether you’re an extrovert or an introvert, you probably hate the interviewing process. No matter how experienced you are, it can be nerve-wracking. Sitting there while someone’s prodding into your past experiences and judging you isn’t fun.

But did you know that most interviewers ask the same questions?

That’s right—all you have to do is learn how to answer some of the most common interview questions, and you’ll be an interview away from landing your dream job!

Just check out our complete guide to the 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers and learn how to ace your next interview.

FAQs on How to Make a Resume

Do you still have some questions about making a resume? Check out the answers to the most frequently asked questions below!

#1. What does a good resume look like in 2024?

For your resume to look good in 2024, make sure it’s organized and clean and isn’t longer than one page.

Be sure to include information that adds value to your application—leave out the focus on your relevant work experience and skills that you can back up, and list as many achievements as possible. 

If you’re using a resume template, choose one based on your industry. Conservative industries like law, banking, and business require more traditional resume templates. But if you’re going for an industry like design, architecture, or marketing, you can go for a creative resume template . 

Remote work is also big in 2024, so if that’s what you’re after, tailor your resume to match the job you want.

#2. How do you make a resume in Word?

The best way to create a resume in Word is to use a pre-designed Microsoft Word template. To access them, you should: 

  • Open MS Word
  • Click “file” from the menu bar 
  • Select “new”
  • Type “resume templates” in the search bar 

That said, Word resume templates are generic, hard to personalize, and overall not very stylish.

Want a resume that looks good and is extremely easy to make? Check out resume templates to get started!

#3. How do I write a resume for my first job?

If you’re writing your first-ever resume for an entry-level position, the hiring manager won’t expect you to have any work experience.

However, you can make up for your lack of experience with your skills and academic achievements.

For example, you can take advantage of extracurricular activities, internships, volunteering experiences, and other non-professional experiences. You can use them to highlight the skills you’ve gained and what you’ve achieved so far.

So, your first job resume should have a resume objective, emphasize your education, and replace your work experience with any internships, volunteering, independent projects, or other experiences.

#4. How to make a resume on Google Docs?

You can make a resume on Google Docs by choosing one of their templates and filling it in on the go.

All you have to do is go to your Google Drive’s template gallery, choose your preferred template, fill in your information, and your Google Docs resume is ready to go! 

That said, Google Docs templates aren’t the most user-friendly choice. You don’t have much flexibility with the layout and formatting isn’t that easy. For example, you tweak a section to the slightest, and the whole resume becomes a mess.

If you want an easier option, check out our resume builder !

#5. What kind of resume do employers prefer?

Typically, employers prefer one-page-long resumes that follow the reverse chronological format. 

Hiring managers receive hundreds of resumes every day, so they don't have the time to read three-page resumes. Try one of our one-page resume templates so you don’t go over the recommended resume length.

Meanwhile, the reverse-chronological format is the most popular because it draws attention to your most recent jobs and professional achievements, which is the #1 most important thing hiring managers look at when evaluating a resume.

#6. How many jobs should you put on your resume? 

You should only include relevant job positions on your resume.

This means that your work experience section should be tailored to the job you are applying for. If you’ve worked five different jobs and they can all add value to your current application, then you should include all five. 

If, on the other hand, you’re applying for, say, a customer service position and some of your past jobs don’t have anything to do with customer service, you should skip them.

#7. Should I put my address on my resume? 

You can put your location (city, state, or country) on your resume, but you don’t need to put your entire physical address.

Putting a physical address on a resume was the norm back when companies would contact you via mail. In today’s world, everyone communicates via email, which is why adding a correct and professional email address to your contact information section is far more important than putting your physical address. 

So, just include your location or-–if you’re a remote worker—specify you prefer to work remotely by writing “working remotely from [location].”

#8. What information should I leave out of my resume?

As a general rule, you shouldn’t include your birthday or your headshot on your resume. This norm varies from country to country but it applies to the USA, Canada, and UK.

If you have plenty of achievements to list under your work experience, then you can leave your basic work responsibilities out of your resume. 

In your education section, you should only include your highest and most recent degree. So, if you hold a Ph.D., you can list that and your Master’s degree and leave your Bachelor’s degree and high school diploma out.

Finally, leave out any skills that aren’t relevant to the job you’re applying for.

#9. Is a resume a CV?

Depending on where you are, a CV (Curriculum Vitae) and a resume might be completely different things.

In most of the world, though, including Europe and Asia, they are used interchangeably for the same document. Both CVs and resumes are one to two pages long, and list skills and experiences relevant to the position you’re applying for.

Sometimes more detailed resumes that go over one page are referred to as CVs. These are typically only used by senior professionals, executives, CEOs, etc.

In the USA, however, a CV is a completely different document. Typically, CVs are detailed and comprehensive documents that highlight your entire academic and professional history. They’re often used for academic, scientific, or research positions, which is why this type of CV can also be referred to as an academic CV.

You can create your CV using one of our CV templates !

#10. Should I write my own resume?

Yes, you should always write your own resume.

Your resume is your opportunity to show the hiring manager your communication, writing, and presentation skills . Employers also evaluate you based on how effectively you can convey information about yourself, and there’s no one that can represent you better than yourself.

Writing your own resume lets you introduce yourself authentically. You have the best understanding of your skills and experiences, and you can personalize them to make your resume stand out.

And, as a bonus, the experience of writing your resume yourself can be reflective and insightful, so it might help you understand your professional journey and career goals better.

#11. Can a resume be two pages?

Generally, we strongly recommend that your resume stick to one page.

Hiring managers go through hundreds of resumes every day, and keeping your resume to one page increases the odds that they’ll see your qualifications faster.

In some cases, like when you have a lot of relevant experience, your resume can go over two pages. But this exception is reserved for senior professionals with over a decade of relevant experience and tons of skills and achievements that simply can’t fit on one page.

#12. Is a simple resume okay?

Absolutely, a simple resume is often more than okay—it's preferable.

Before your resume even gets to the hiring manager, a complicated layout could get it rejected by the applicant tracking system (ATS). A simple resume template can help get your application straight to the hiring manager.

A clean layout can also make sure that your resume is easily readable and looks professional. This can focus the hiring manager's attention on your work experience and skills without excessive clutter or flashy colors to distract them.

Key Takeaways

And that’s a wrap!

If you’ve followed all of our advice until now, congrats! You’re probably an expert on how to make a resume.

To recap, let’s go through some of the most important lessons we’ve learned so far...

  • Use the right resume builder to make the process as smooth as possible. You don’t want to mess around with formatting for hours before even starting to work on your resume!
  • Focus on your achievements over responsibilities. This can help you stand out from all the other applicants, especially if you back your claims up with data.
  • Include all the must-have sections, like the resume summary, work experience, education, and skills. Then leverage optional sections if you have leftover space.
  • Tailor your resume for the job you’re applying for. Everything listed on your resume should be relevant to the specific job you’re applying for, and you should write a new resume for every new job application.
  • Take the time to perfect your cover letter. It’s just as important as your resume, so make sure you pay as much attention to it!

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Writing Samples & References

Writing samples.

Some employers will ask you to submit samples of your writing as a part of your application. Writing samples demonstrate your ability to analyze information and display your communication skills. You may be asked for a writing sample if you are applying for a position in a writing-intensive field such as advertising, journalism, public relations, law, media, or research. Approach the writing sample as an opportunity to show employers how well you can express yourself in writing.

If you aren’t sure about the appropriateness of your writing sample, visit the Cawley Career Education Center to speak with our staff or contact the organization to ask a clarifying question.

Writing Sample Tips

Do not submit a writing sample unless it is specifically requested. If you are unsure, reach out to the employer and ask.

Follow the application instructions.  Most employers will specify how many pages in length they expect the sample to be.

  • If they do not specify length, submit 2 to 5 pages of writing, double-spaced. You may use an excerpt from a longer document. Mention at the top of the first page that you are submitting only a selection from a longer document. Be sure to specify what the prompt was.
  • Clearly label each submission with an appropriate title and origin (if necessary).
  • If providing hard copies, use resume paper and/or put them in a presentation binder.

Focus on quality and edit as necessary.   Whatever writing sample you choose to submit should represent your best writing. Even if you have completed an assignment for a course, re-check your work for style and substance to be sure that it is the best possible representation of your writing. 

  • If you are planning to submit a paper, consider meeting with the professor for whom you wrote the original paper for additional feedback and suggestions. 
  • Remove any privileged or sensitive information.

Consider content .   While some employers may specify the subject matter they wish your writing sample to address, that is not always the case. If they do not, submit something that would be similar to the type of writing you would be expected to do within the position. For example, if you are applying for a position within a public relations firm, something similar to a press release might be most appropriate.

Do not use anything too old. You want to make sure that you are giving employers a recent example of the quality of your work.

Submit only your own work . If you incorporate others’ work, cite your sources. (A short bibliography does not usually count towards your total number of pages.)

Reference Page Tips

  • Ask permission to use individuals as a positive reference prior to submitting their name and contact information to an employer.  Ask how they would prefer to be contacted, or if their availability will be limited in any way.  Make note of these preferences/limitations on your reference page.
  • Follow employer instructions as it relates to both the number of references required and the types of individuals they would prefer to contact.
  • Include a minimum of three professional references , unless the employer indicates otherwise. Note that if a personal connection acted as a direct supervisor for your work experience, consider adding a fourth reference who knew you only in a professional setting.
  • List references in order of importance or applicability to the position.
  • Add a “relationship line” for each reference . This helps employers understand the context of your interactions.
  • Send your resume and a copy of the job description to your references . Consider setting up a brief conversation to share why you are interested in the position. This allows them to prepare thoroughly to speak to your qualifications.

At home, abroad, working, interning?  Wherever you are this summer, contact OCS or make an appointment for a virtual advising session. We are available all summer! 

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Writing Samples

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Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

Source: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/interviewing/guide-to-submitting-a-writing-sample 

Writing samples are used by employers to evaluate your writing skills, tone and style. If you are applying for positions that require strong writing skills, you might be asked to submit a writing sample.

While some employers might ask you to email or upload your writing sample as part of your application, others might ask you to bring it to your interview or possibly email it after your interviews to help employers make a decision. In this guide, we discuss what employers look for in a writing sample, how to choose a writing sample, how to write one and how to submit it.

What is a writing sample?

A writing sample is a supplemental document for a job application often requested for jobs that include a significant amount of writing, like those in journalism, marketing, public relations and research. Employers might also ask for a writing sample if you will be responsible for writing and communicating important information or correspondences. For example, if you are applying for a job in HR at a small company, you might be responsible for sending company-wide information. In this case, the employer will look for candidates with strong writing skills who can clearly communicate important information across the company.

What do employers look for in a writing sample?

Different employers look for different details in your writing sample depending on the job, company and industry. Every employer, however, will look for tone, style and writing skills including content, grammar, spelling and punctuation. While the specific writing style of the company can often be learned on the job, employers might be looking to hire someone with a certain level of writing skills at their first day on the job.

How long should a writing sample be?

In most cases, your writing sample should be around 750 words or between one and two pages. Like your resume, employers have a limited amount of time to review your writing sample. A brief, impactful writing sample is better than a long, less impressive one. Often times, employers will provide a specific page or word count they require from your sample. If you decide to submit a research paper or other lengthy document, you can make it shorter for the employer by selecting a certain passage or section.

How do I choose a writing sample?

While some employers might give you a writing assignment with a specific prompt, others might simply ask you to provide a sample from your past work. Choose a writing sample that is relevant for the job you’re applying for. Here are some examples you may want to consider:

  • Research papers from a job or class
  • Narrative papers from a job or class
  • Other writing assignments
  • Press releases
  • Articles or other contributions

When deciding which piece of writing you should submit, consider the following ideas:

Follow the employer’s instruction

The employer might ask for a specific type of writing like a research paper or a piece covering a certain topic. Read the employer’s instructions carefully before making a writing sample selection.

Consider relevant writing samples

When deciding on a writing sample, you should consider only those writing pieces that are relevant to the position. For example, if you are applying for a scientific research position, you should select a research paper from your most recent position or highest level of schooling. If you are applying for a position in PR, you should submit a press release or other relevant documents.

Find relatable topics

Along with selecting a relevant writing style, you should try to find a sample that also relates to the subject matter of the position. Submitting a sample with content similar to what you’ll be writing about on the job will help employers relate your writing skills directly to the job.

Align your writing with the company’s tone

You should select a piece of writing that is relatable for the company. For example, you should not submit a sarcastic, irreverent writing sample for a company with a professional, helpful brand image. Alternatively, you might not submit a modest, simple writing sample to a company that’s sole focus is risk and creativity. You can find clues about a company’s tone by researching their website,  Company Page  and recent news articles or press releases.

You should also read several pieces of writing that the company has already published. This could include reading their company blog, website or research papers.

Make sure it is up to date

Selecting a writing sample that is older than one year might contain out of date or irrelevant content. If you are selecting an old writing sample, be sure to carefully review and update it to reflect the most recent ideas. You also want to demonstrate that you have recently had to use your writing skills—if you send an employer a writing sample from several years ago, they may assume that you have not done any writing since then.

Avoid sensitive subject matter

Unless specifically requested by the employer, you should avoid sensitive content like politics, religion or personal information. You should also review your writing sample to exclude any confidential information like third-party contact information or private company information like financial or other data.

What if I don’t have a writing sample?

You might not have a writing sample if you have no professional experience or have not previously held a job where you produced applicable pieces of writing. If this is the case, it is acceptable to write a new sample for the employer. This way, you’ll be able to write a fresh, relevant passage that is specific to the position you’re applying for.

Pay close attention to the employer’s direction regarding the writing sample, research the company for clues on tone and style and review your document carefully for grammar, spelling and punctuation mistakes.

How to submit a writing sample

Before submitting a writing sample, you should proofread it several times to ensure it is free of errors. It is critical to achieve as close to perfection as possible in a writing sample, as your writing skills are the key focus of this document. It might be helpful to read your document backward—doing so presents the words in a new order and makes it easier to catch mistakes. You might also consider asking trusted friends or family to review your writing sample.

Whether you submit an entire piece or part of a writing sample, it can be helpful to write a short introductory paragraph for context. You might include it directly on your sample, on a cover page or in your email. For example:

“Please find my writing sample for the Sr. Product Research position attached to this email. This sample is a passage from a larger study about how product simplicity impacts consumers. I believe it showcases my ability to clearly communicate results from an important project that lead to key achievements for the company.”

After you’ve polished your writing sample, you should follow the employer’s instructions when submitting it. You might be asked to upload your sample on an online application, email it or bring it to your interview. If you are bringing your sample to an interview, you should bring at least five hard copies in case you have multiple interviewers. If you are applying to several writing jobs, you might consider creating an online writing portfolio that you can easily send to employers.

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Advice When Internships/Job Applications Ask for a Writing Sample

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What is a writing sample?

A writing sample is an example of how well you summarize complex ideas, research papers, editorials, critiques (be sure to omit names), articles, journals, etc.  Make sure that what you send in with your internship or job applications best exemplifies the spectrum of your writing abilities.

What should I consider when selecting a writing sample?

  • Follow employers’ instructions; it is fine to ask for clarity if you are unsure.
  • If the employer does not specify, submit a sample that closely matches the subject matter or position. Assignments related to the industry or subject matter can significantly aide your job search. For example, a case study from a political science or law-related course would be an excellent writing sample for a position in a law firm or with an elected official. If you are applying for a job in journalism, you may want to submit an article you wrote for the campus newspaper. For a job that involves research, submit a research paper. For non-profits, you can submit a research paper relevant to the organization’s mission.  Choose samples that demonstrate the type of writing you would do on the job.
  • If you have little to no relevant work experience (i.e., you are applying for an entry-level job), you may submit a school assignment. A lab report would work for a science-related position. An assignment from a business or technical writing class would also be appropriate.

Writing Sample Checklist

First and foremost, make sure the sample is well-written and of the highest quality! Ask yourself if your sample has a clear, well-articulated thesis, is it concise and to the point, does it follow a logical structure, and can the reader easily understand and follow it. Other suggestions and tips:

  • Graded Assignments. As an undergrad student or recent graduate, some applicants choose to use a section of a graded assignment from a class. If sending a graded paper, make sure you received a decent grade, but do not necessarily rule out your “B” papers. Some “B” papers may have potential if you revise them before using them as your writing sample.
  • Length. Unless otherwise stated, a good length is 2-5 pages. If you want to send a sample of a larger document, select a 2-5 page section and introduce it with a paragraph that puts the selection into the proper context. Avoid sending a 10-15 page research paper even if you received a good grade.
  • Your own work. If it was a collaborative piece, make sure you state so and indicate which part was your responsibility.
  • Paper Genre. Unless otherwise specified by the employer, and if possible, make sure that your samples match the genre of the writing that the position would involve.  For example, if you are applying for journalism positions, submit “clips”—actual articles that have been published in a campus newspaper, blog, or other publication.  For a research position, submit an in-depth analysis of an issue or a topic.  For a PR position, submit a press release that you have written from a previous internship or as the marketing chair of a campus group.  If you don’t have any, you can write a press release for an upcoming event (just make sure you specify that it has not been published).
  • Your best writing.   If you are deciding between two papers you have written, and one is better written than the other but your weaker paper is topically more relevant, choose the paper that is better written to submit. The other option is to rewrite the relevant paper to be stronger before you submit it. Remember, it’s your writing skills that the employer is assessing, and being topically relevant is just an added bonus.
  • Excerpts. Most employers will specify how many pages or how many clips they want. If they don’t, then submit 2-5 pages of writing, usually double-spaced (unless it is a clip). This can be a combination of 1 or more writing samples. If you want to use a paper that is longer than 5 pages, provide an excerpt with a notation at the top that tells the employer that it is an excerpt from a [number]-page paper on [topic] and where in the paper this excerpt is from. You might share the introduction, sections of the body, and your conclusion, so the reader is still able to follow your thought process.
  • Clean copies. Make sure that you send in papers that do not have your professor’s comments. Provide clean copies of your writing and revise them as necessary. Proofread your document to avoid errors or typos.

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Writing samples.

It is not uncommon for employers to request writing samples. Writing samples are simply good examples of your writing skills. They are designed to ascertain whether you have the necessary writing and often research skills to complete required tasks of the position you seek.

You may want to start developing a portfolio of well-written pieces so you can quickly refer to them when needed. You might want to select pieces that show your full range of talents. Some samples might include how well you summarize complex ideas, research papers, editorials, critiques (be sure to omit names), articles, journals, and blogs.

On rare occasions the employer may request a specific kind of writing sample (e.g., a case study). If you have to create one, stick very closely to the guidelines provided.

If a writing sample is requested, here are some guidelines to help you prepare:

First and foremost, make sure the sample is well-written and of the highest quality! Ask yourself if your sample has a clear, well-articulated thesis; is it concise and to the point; does it follow a logical structure; and can the reader easily understand and follow it. Other suggestions and tips:

  • It is understood that as an undergraduate student or recent graduate, you will likely use a section of a graded assignment from a class. If sending a graded paper, make sure you received a decent grade, but do not necessarily rule out your "B" papers. Some "B" papers may have potential if you revise them.
  • Unless otherwise stated, a good length is 2-5 pages. If you want to send a sample of a larger document, select a 2-5 page section and introduce it with a paragraph that puts the selection into the proper context. Avoid sending 10-15 page research paper even if you received a good grade.
  • Provide your own work; if it was a collaborative piece, make sure you state so and indicate which part was your responsibility.
  • Assignments related to the industry or subject matter can significantly aide your job search. For example, a case study from a political science or law related course would be an excellent writing sample for a position in a law firm or with an elected official. If you are applying for a job in journalism, you may want to submit an article you wrote for the campus newspaper. For a job that involves research, submit a research paper. For non-profits, you can submit a research paper relevant to the organization's mission.

Preparing the Sample (if not a published article or book)

  • Put your name on it!
  • Do not try font or margin tricks to make a 2-page paper into a 5-page paper.
  • Double and triple check for errors. If you wrote the paper for a class, incorporate any suggestions from your professor or peers.
  • Submit a clean copy without a professor's grades or marks.
  • If you cited works in the sample, include the bibliography.
  • Include a brief note about the context of the sample. For example: "This writing sample is an excerpt from an essay I wrote for my Women's Studies class 'Gender and American Society.' I worked with a partner on this assignment, so I have included only the section of the paper on 'Gender and the Family,' which represents my individual work."

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  • CV and Cover Letter
  • What to Say When Emailing a...

What to Say When Emailing a Resume (with Examples)

10 min read · Updated on January 11, 2024

Jen David

Introduce yourself professionally when you email your resume

You've written the perfect resume and tailored it to the role you're aspiring to. What should you do next? A few years back, you'd have printed it off on some quality paper, addressed an envelope in your best handwriting, posted it off, and settled in to wait for a response. These days, though, it's more common to email your resume. It's faster, it's more professional, and it's easier to share a file than a printout.

But if you're going to email your resume, what should you say? Should you attach a cover letter? How much detail should you include? 

So many questions! 

But fear not, TopResume is here to help you decide what to say when emailing a resume, and we have answers to all these questions and more. Settle in as we guide you through it.

Should I email my resume?

Yes! It's absolutely fine to email your resume when you apply for a job. In fact, it's usually preferred to printed correspondence these days. Of course, the most important point is that you should follow the instructions on the job posting. If it requests a printed resume or a resume uploaded via an online portal, you should definitely apply in line with those instructions. However, if there are no specific instructions, an email application is advisable. Just make sure you're addressing it to the right person!

General rules for emailing your resume

Before we get into the specifics, let's refresh on some general guidelines for emailing your resume to a company. After all, first impressions count, so using proper email etiquette is important.

Use a professional email address. “ HotLips69@...” may have seemed cool and funny when you set up the account, but does it really convey that you're a credible professional? If necessary, set up a new email account to use for job applications – and remember to check it regularly for responses!

Add a clear subject line. Make the point of your email clear with a logical  subject line – you could include the job title of the vacancy you're applying for, for example, or refer to the fact that the email is a job application or resume.

Choose a professional greeting. Think “Dear [name],” or even just “[name],” rather than “Hiya” or “Greetings.” While email is less formal than a letter, you still need to keep the tone professional.

Be concise. Short,  snappy paragraphs are easier to read on a screen, and no one wants to trudge through pages of waffle to find the information they need. Respect the reader's time by keeping it simple.

Add a formal sign-off. A version of “thank you” and your name is sufficient – you may also want to add your professional title, a contact number, and a link to your portfolio if you have one.

Don't forget the attachments! Make sure that you've actually attached your resume (and your cover letter, if required). Ensure they have sensible file names, too: “Jay Miller – Resume” or “J Miller – Sales Executive Resume” is more professional and easier to retrieve than something like “JM 010224 v3” or simply “Resume.” Also, double-check the file type that you're sending – check out our article  Word vs PDF  if you're not sure.

What to say when emailing your resume – the detail

So now we've reviewed the basics of email etiquette, let's get down to business. You need to know what to say when emailing a resume. Well, the exact wording will vary depending on the situation, the role, and your personality, but you'll certainly need to include the following:

Why you're emailing

Your reader may have a ton of open vacancies and is likely to receive many resumes for each one. Make their life easier by clearly stating the role you're interested in applying for. If you have a reference number for the vacancy, you can include that too.

Your elevator pitch

Briefly explain who you are , what you do, and why you're the right person for the open role. This doesn't need to take up a lot of space or be very detailed – the key thing here is to be convincing enough for them to want to open your resume document to find out more. Include whatever information is most pertinent to the role – that could be your academic qualifications, your industry experience, awards and accolades, or particular skills. Refer to the job posting to find out what the company wants to see in a successful candidate and ensure the requirements are reflected in your email.

A call to action

Encourage the reader to open your resume, reach out with further questions, or schedule an interview. This one little line can show your enthusiasm for the role, emphasize your professionalism, and prompt your reader to take the next step in progressing your application.

What to say when emailing a resume – sample messages

Do you need a bit more inspiration to craft your message? Take a look at these sample emails and use them as a frame for your own resume email. Remember, the job advert is your cheat sheet when it comes to deciding what details to prioritize here.

What to say when cold emailing a resume

To: Katie French

From: Matthew Cole

Subject: Sales resume

I've long admired XYZ Inc. as a leading supplier of home tech solutions and have heard many positive reviews about your company as an employer. To that end, I am attaching my resume in the event that a sales vacancy may soon arise.

As you can see, I have enjoyed a successful 10-year career in technology sales and am a committed user and advocate of your products. This year, I am on track to exceed my sales target by 46%. I would bring an extensive network of industry contacts and a proven ability to motivate sales teams to surpass expectations.

If there are no suitable vacancies at the moment, please feel free to keep my resume on file for future reference. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Matthew Cole

Sales Manager, Acme Products

What to say when emailing a resume in response to a job posting

Subject: Sales Executive vacancy (Ref: ABC123)

In response to your advertisement for a Sales Executive, I am attaching my resume. As you can see, I combine eight years of sales experience with a degree in Marketing and three awards for excellence in sales roles. 

The advertised role is particularly interesting to me, as it will allow me to leverage my expertise in technical sales, provide the opportunity for international growth, and establish trusted relationships with your clients to open new avenues for revenue and increased sales.

Please don't hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions; I look forward to discussing my suitability further with you at an interview.Thank you for your consideration,

Sales Executive, Acme Products

What to say when emailing a resume to a recruiter

Subject: Healthcare Roles

Dear Katie,

I saw on JobBoard.com that you are recruiting for several healthcare roles, and would like to submit my resume for your consideration. I combine 10 years' experience as a Healthcare Assistant with numerous industry certifications and consistently receive positive patient feedback.

I look forward to hearing from you,

What to say when emailing a resume to follow up on a conversation

Subject: Finance Manager follow-up

Following our phone discussion earlier today, I would like to reiterate my interest in the Finance Manager position and attach my resume for your consideration.

As you can see, I am currently fulfilling the Finance Manager role at XYZ Company and am looking forward to developing my career within a global organization. I have a master's degree in Business Administration, as well as extensive experience in managing the finance function within a security business. I look forward to bringing my leadership skills to your team of finance experts.

Please reach out to me at 555-555-5555 when you have had a chance to review my attached resume.Regards,

Finance Manager, XYZ Company

What to say when emailing a resume following a referral

Subject: Events Manager vacancy

Dear Ms French,

Please find attached my resume. I have been referred to the Events Manager position by one of your colleagues, John Day, who I previously worked with at ABC Inc. Having delivered many successful events with John as my manager, I'm flattered that he has now asked me to apply for your open role. 

I've recently delivered a conference for 800 international delegates and a team building event for 5 national teams, both of which were very well received and were completed within challenging budgets. I am confident that I can bring a similar level of client satisfaction to DEF Inc. and look forward to discussing the position further with you.

Please don't hesitate to get in touch to schedule an interview at your convenience,

555-555-5555

Should you attach a cover letter when emailing a resume?

Now we've covered what to say when emailing a resume, it's time to consider the cover letter. As you can see, we recommend that the body of the email be kept short and concise. If you feel the need to include more detail, you can consider attaching a cover letter as well as a resume. There's no obligation to do this unless a letter is specifically requested as part of the application instructions, but it does give you the opportunity to expand on key points of interest.

Top tip: You may like to read our article on  how to write a cover letter to make sure you get this part of your application bang on!

How long does it take to hear back after emailing a resume?

Don't panic if you don't hear back immediately! While email is a speedy way to apply, recruiters and hiring managers receive many resumes for every open role and need time to sift through them, create shortlists, and schedule interviews. That said, certain recruiters have a reputation for ghosting unsuitable candidates, or your application may simply have been overlooked, so there's no harm in following up after a week or two if you haven't heard anything.  

What to write in a follow-up email

Subject: Communications Assistant vacancy (ref: 12345)

I emailed my resume to you last week in response to your advertisement for a Communications Assistant. I just wanted to check that you'd received it, and to reiterate that I remain very interested in the role.

If you didn't receive the resume or have further questions regarding my application, please do get in touch with me either via email or by phone at 555-555-5555.

Email with confidence

Now you know what to say when emailing your resume in any situation, you're ready to apply for your dream job! Use this checklist to make sure you've nailed it before you hit the send button:

Correct email address and personalized greeting

Appropriate subject line

Clarification of the role you're applying for

Elevator pitch

Call to action

Professional sign-off

Attachments attached

Final proofread

If you feel that your resume isn't quite ready to be unleashed upon the world, why not get an expert opinion? Our free resume review will explain which areas need further work before you submit your application.

Recommended reading:

How to Write the Perfect Goodbye Email to Co-Workers & Clients

The Networking Email That Works Every Time

How To Use AI To Prepare For A Job Interview

Related Articles:

Guide to Writing a Great Resume with No Work Experience

How To Write a Sick Leave Letter (with Template and Example)

Business Analyst Skills: Add to Improve Your Resume!

See how your resume stacks up.

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what type of writing sample should i send with resume

For companies

Nov 7, 2022

How to email a resume with 8 samples and templates

At some point during your career you’ll need to send your resume by email. Here's how you do it.

Blog writer

Lawrie Jones

Table of contents

Are you searching for a job? Thinking of applying?

Either way, at some point, you’ll need to send your resume by email.

When sending an email with a resume attached, you’ll need to ensure your message is targeted at the right person, provides all the information you need and hits the right tone of voice. 

How to email a resume

You might be wondering, what should I write in an email when sending a resume? That's what we show you in this guide on how to email a resume.

After going over the basic principles and essential things to note about emailing a resume, you can see 8 examples of resume emails.

What to write in an email when sending a resume

For each job, US employers can expect to receive around 250 resumes . Naturally, they’re looking for reasons to discard them. Informal emails, spelling mistakes, and grammar slip-ups will see your email filed under “Junk”.

Great resume emails are simple, straightforward and easy to understand. They’re not overly funny or attempt to be friendly. But they are professional and provide a little glimpse into your personality. 

The purpose of your email is simply to give the recruiter enough information so that they are encouraged to open your resume. This isn’t a cover letter, so you don’t need to go into vast levels of detail about who you are and why you’re applying, but a short “elevator pitch” is appropriate. 

10 things to include in every resume email 

Here’s a checklist of 10 things you should write in an email when sending a resume:

  • Short introduction of yourself
  • Statement about the position you are applying for (to avoid any misunderstanding!)
  • Brief “elevator pitch” about why you should be considered for the position
  • Previous experience with similar roles or relevant results of similar jobs
  • Relevant personal information (more on this in the email format section)
  • Contact details (including preference)
  • Helpful information (such as if you’re going on holiday in the next few days, for example)
  • Offer to answer any questions that the recruiter might have (about interview dates, for example)
  • Request for information on the next steps
  • And remember to attach your cover letter and resume!

Should you send a resume by email?

The answer is 100% yes. Sure, in many cases, you can submit your resume through an online form, so why should you send your resume by email?

Firstly, it creates a personal connection between you and the recruiter. You’ve taken the initiative to email them, and that’s more effective than the anonymity of a web form. 

Secondly, you’re not constrained by character counts. That means you can go into as much detail as you wish (as we explain below, don’t overload the recruiter with too much information). 

Thirdly, establishing a dialogue through email enables you to send follow-up emails if you need to – and in many cases, you will need to. Even the best-planned recruitment processes can be hit by delays , so be prepared to send a follow-up (and use our guide to help!).

Use a professional email address for your resume

Like it or not, your email address is an integral part of your first impression and silly email addresses can harm your chances of getting a job, say the experts. It takes seconds to set up a new online email account, so why put your job search success at risk? 

Some people use their work email accounts to send out resume emails. While it’s not a no-no, it’s risky. Someone may inadvertently see the message, or 

Sending resume email format

Hiring managers and executives are busy people, so you want to keep your email short and sweet. By stripping your messages back to the basics, they’re quicker and easier to write – which means you can spend more time searching for jobs!

When sending a resume email, use a professional format like this:

  • Resume email subject line
  • Email body (following our top 10 tips for effective resume emails)

Let’s look at the critical aspects of every resume email in more detail.

1. Subject line for resume email

Your resume email is a critical part of the process. Some online guides suggest you try to be friendly or funny, but don’t. Instead, please stick to the basics, keep things simple and make it easy for anyone to understand what your email is about. 

Here are some principles for effective resume email subject lines:

  • Label your email “Job application” or “Application for”
  • Include the job title in the subject line
  • Add a reference number

Here’s how this can work in practice:

  • Job application – Marketing Director – REF000111
  • Application for Marketing Director – REF000111
  • Resume attached – Marketing Director position – REF000111

Of course, you can experiment and develop your own resume email subject lines. In some industries, the creative sector, you may be bolder. 

2. Email body for sending resume

The email body is where you go into details about who you are, what job you’re applying for, and why. We’ve detailed the critical parts in include in your email body above, but as a brief recap, every resume email should include the following:

  • Introduction to you
  • Details of the job you’re applying for (including a reference number)
  • A short explanation of why you’re applying
  • Any other information 

It sounds like a lot, but you can cover it in a few short sentences. See our resume email examples below to see how we’ve achieved this. 

3. How to end a resume email

The end of your resume email is your opportunity to offer to answer any questions and ask about the next stage in the process. 

As well as a closing statement, you should provide the essential information the recruiter might need. Always end your resume email with the following:

  • Phone number
  • Relevant social media links, like LinkedIn and Twitter
  • Attach your cover letter and resume

4. Best resume email closings and sign-offs

Resume emails aren’t about being cool but clear, polite, and professional. Go with a classic email sign-off such as “look forward to hearing from you” or “kind regards”, and avoid exciting endings and exclamation marks (“Thanks!!!”).

8 resume email samples

We’ve unpacked the basics of a great resume email. Now it’s our chance to show you how to put everything into practice with 8 resume email samples.

We’ve tried to provide sample resume emails that cover several common situations. These templates include the essential hints and tips we’ve developed. 

Templates are great ways to learn how to format messages, but be sure to adapt and update these resume emails before sending them.

1. Sample email to send resume for job

This is a standard sample email for sending a resume for a job. This is a classic template that suits all circumstances, services, and sectors.

It’s not the most exciting, but it’s quick and easy to adapt, meaning you can send more applications faster. More applications mean more chances to secure a new job.

2. Sample email to send resume to recruiter

Recruiters can include those working in job agencies, internal recruiters and HR partners.

The flow of information is the same as the standard template above, but we add more detail about essentials that recruiters will need, including start dates, notice periods, and leave.

3. Simple sample email to send resume for job

If you have already had an interview with the company and you were asked to send a resume, keep it brief and simple. Sending a resume before an interview provides some vital background information and context for the company, so it’s worth doing if you can. 

4. Sample follow-up email after sending resume

As we’ve explained, you’ll likely have to send many resumes before securing a response or an interview.

If you’re excited about a position or want to understand the next steps in the process, here’s a sample follow-up email after sending a resume that you can use.

5. Sample email cover letter with attached resume

Some recruiters and some companies will request a cover letter alongside a resume. When this is the case, you can assume the recruiter will read your cover letter, which means your email can be much shorter and more precise.

There’s no need to go into much detail about why you’re passionate about the position. See what we mean in this sample email cover letter with the attached resume.

6. Thank you for considering my resume email sample

Some job seekers stop contact when they receive a no. Others will send a thank you email for considering a resume, which can establish a relationship. Here’s a classic “thank you for considering my resume” email sample.

7. Asking someone to review your resume email sample

Writing a resume isn’t easy, and after spending days poring over the details, it’s often a good idea to get someone else to check it before you send it. So here’s a sample email asking for someone to review your resume.

8. Sample how to respond to a resume received email

If you’re a manager or recruiter, you’ll probably have to send hundreds of emails responding to resumes. Here’s a standard professional sample response that you can cut and paste.

Best email template for sending resume

You’ve read our 8 sample resume samples, but we’ve saved the ultimate email for last. Here’s the best email template for sending a resume by email. 

Final words on sending your resume via email

If you’re searching for a job, you’ll spend lots of time sending out your resume. By breaking things down into chunks, it’s easier to apply them in practice.

When you come to write your resume emails, remember to follow our top tips, be professional and provide some insight into your personality.

You’ll likely experience rejection when sending out your resume, but don’t be disheartened. Your perfect job could be an email away!

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What To Write in an Email When Sending a Resume to an Employer? (+3 Email Templates)

  • Klara Cervenanska , 
  • Updated January 12, 2024 7 min read

Have you found a job posting that asks you to submit your resume via email? Or maybe you’ve decided to approach your dream company directly. If so, you’re probably asking yourself right now — what to write in an email when sending my resume so I will stand out?

Sometimes employers provide clear instructions on what the email format should include. If that’s the case, follow the employer’s directions closely. 

But if you can’t find any instructions, don’t worry — you can follow the best practices described in this article!

Additionally, there are also 3 email templates for what to write in an email when sending a resume to an employer that you can download and edit to your liking.

Table of Contents

Click on a section to skip

3 sample emails for sending your resume to recruiters:

How to email a resume: a few tips to keep in mind before sending the email.

  • Write an effective subject line. It's the first thing they're going to see

Email body for sending a resume: Keep it crisp, yet formal

Attaching files — resume and cover letter, what should you do before sending your email, what to write in your resume email key takeaways.

Feel free to use any of these templates as your first draft.

#1 Template of an email to send with your resume

#2 template of an email to send with your resume, #3 template of an email to send with your resume.

Additionally, these 10 more job application email templates will give you the help you need at any stage of the hiring process.

Finally, if you already have a fantastic LinkedIn profile but no resume, there's no need to write your CV from scratch. You can  convert your LinkedIn profile into resume  in seconds.

Before you start writing, ask yourself this:   Who is the person you're writing to?

Try to find the hiring manager's contact details so you can address them by name. A slightly more personal approach can decrease the chance of your resume being forgotten or disposed of.

Remember that   your email address needs to be professional . Emails like julezizcoolz@yahoo may have been cool in 2005, but not anymore. Instead, create a professional email address that consists of your first and last name.

You should also consider when to email your resume. In general, you want your email to be among the first ones they receive that day. This means you should send it very early — ideally before 8am.

The same applies for days of week. The later in the week you send your email, the lower the probability that someone reviews it. This is why you should send it very early on a Monday morning.

Naturally, do not put off applying if it's a first come first serve kind of job application. 

Key takeaways:

  • Look up the hiring manager's contact details;
  • Your email address needs to be professional;
  • Send it on a Monday, ideally well before 8am;

Write an effective subject line. It's the first thing they're going to see

Sure, the subject line is just a tiny part of the whole email. However, it's also the very first thing the recruiter is going to see. That's why you want the subject line of your resume email to be absolutely spot on.

First of all, check the job posting for instructions regarding the submission. There may be a preferred subject format the company uses. If that's the case, then you need to stick to it.

However, if there are no instructions, you should stick to the standard format for subject lines :

  • Subject: ‘Job application’ – Job title, Job ID (if applicable) — Your Name
  • Example: Job application – Office Manager, Job ID #1553 — Ian Lumberjack
  • Example (with referral): Referral from John Wick: Job application – Graphic Designer, Job ID #1554  — Nina Hughes

If someone recommended you for the job, definitely make this clear in the subject line. You can add your title or qualification if you wish — but remember, keep the subject line succinct.

Start off with a formal greeting and address the hiring manager by name (preferably last name).

In the first short paragraph you should state who you are, why you are sending this email and what the email contains.

Continue the next paragraph with a short but effective introduction of your best and proudest achievements. Of course, only mention those achievements that are relevant for the job. Close this paragraph by saying what value you would bring to the company and which skills you will use to accomplish this.

In the closing paragraph you need to say that you're looking forward to hearing back from them and meeting in person. You may add a captivating call for action   but be careful not to sound rude or overly keen.

Yours faithfully (US English) or Yours sincerely  (British English).

And finally, a professional signature is a must! Remember to include your contact details.

[Your name]

[Your job title]

[Email address]

[Phone number]

[LinkedIn profile] -  optional 

Remember, you want to keep the body of the email short and succinct. Don't go in too much detail otherwise you might loose the hiring manager's attention. 

Keep in mind that you simply cannot elaborate on every accomplishment and every work experience due to limited space. The email needs to be informative and concise.

This should go without saying but, don't forget to attach your resume to the email! 

Consider whether it's relevant to also attach your cover letter . When you apply for a job in bigger companies you may actually benefit from sending your cover letter as well as your resume. Just remember not to repeat yourself too much in your email body and your cover letter.

Avoid naming the attachments generically or randomly. Names like fghjvh.pdf or resume2.pdf can make it hard for the hiring manager to find these documents later. Name your a ttachments in a way that makes them easy to find   — Name_Surname_Resume.pdf and Name_Surname_Cover_Letter.pdf

The best format for sending your resume and cover letter is .pdf or .doc. We suggest saving your documents as  PDFs , since it's a universally accepted file format, it's easy to open and will not distort the formatting of your documents.

If you’re considering sending a video resume, you should know  how to convert video to MP4 , as it’s the most common format supported across different browsers and devices.

Keep in mind that files should not be larger than 10MB. Otherwise  they might be considered suspicious.

Last but not least, before sending it out, get your resume analyzed to make sure it contains everything it should.

  • Resume and cover letter need to be sent as attachments;
  • Name your attachments in a way that makes them easy to find;
  • Save documents in the PDF format;
  • Files should not be larger than 10MB.

Before you send the email with your resume and cover letter, you should check it for any spelling or grammatical mistakes.

Having bad grammar is definitely not something you want to be remembered for. Ask a friend to proofread all your documents. It can make a big difference. 

Additionally, it may be a good idea to send yourself a test email to see whether the formatting and layout of the email is up to the expected standard.

Don't forget to test download and open your files. Check whether you've attached the right file(s).

Also, avoid using any colorful fonts, pictures or emoticons. 

We can check your resume for you.

Scan your resume for issues and see how it compares against other resumes in our database.

Sending your resume attached to a well-written email can be a very effective strategy. It can help you find a way around ATS algorithms that filter out unsuitable resumes before they can even get to an HR employee for evaluation.

So how do you write one?

  • Before you start writing the email, make sure you know who to address. Knowing the hiring manager's name will make the email feel more personal and decrease the chance of it being forgotten.
  • Your resume address should sound professional. Send your resume email early on a Monday morning for maximum effectiveness.
  • We have provided you with email templates. No matter which one you choose, remember — keep the email short, informative and professional.
  • Attach your resume and cover letter in the PDF format and name them in a way that makes them easy to find, for example  Name_Surname_Resume.pdf and Name_Surname_Cover_Letter.pdf
  • After you have written the email and attached the documents, ask someone to proofread it for you to avoid any grammar errors and typos. Lastly, send yourself a test email to check the formatting and test download the files. 

After you send in your resume, cover letter and your job application, wait for a couple of days before sending a follow up email .

Christy's word of advice

For bigger companies, your application will probably be forwarded straight to the ATS, so just a short email referencing the attached cover letter/resume is fine. An exception is if you’ve been referred to them directly, in which case, keep it formal but mention the referee’s name. For smaller companies where your application is more likely to be manually reviewed, showing a bit of personality will help you to stand out.

Christy Morgan, Resident HR Expert

Concluding thought — even if you construct the perfect email to send with your resume, you still need to make sure you have an impressive resume and cover letter.  

We've got you covered. Check out these articles to help you create the perfect resume and cover letter:

  • How to Write a Resume: The Only Resume Guide You’ll Need in 2024
  • The Only Cover Letter Guide You’ll Need in 2024 (+Examples)

When emailing your resume to a hiring manager, start with a formal greeting using their last name. In the first paragraph, briefly introduce yourself and explain the purpose of your email. Next, highlight your most relevant and proud achievements, linking them to the value you can bring to the company and the skills you'll use to achieve this. Conclude by expressing your eagerness to hear back and the hope of meeting them in person. Sign off with "Yours faithfully" (US English) or "Yours sincerely" (British English), and include a professional signature with your contact details.

When sending your resume to a hiring manager via email, the subject should always include your name and purpose, e.g. Job application – Job title — Your Name .

In your email when sending a resume with a reference, briefly introduce yourself, mention the position you're applying for, and how you came to know about it. Specifically mention your reference's name and your relationship with them . Then continue by highlighting your most relevant and proud achievements, linking them to the value you can bring to the company. Conclude by expressing your eagerness to hear back and meeting them in person. Sign off.

Klara graduated from the University of St Andrews in Scotland. After having written resumes for many of her fellow students, she began writing full-time for Kickresume. Klara is our go-to person for all things related to student or 'no experience resumes'. At the same time, she has written some of the most popular resume advice articles on this blog. Her pieces were featured in multiple CNBC articles. When she's not writing, you'll probably find her chasing dogs or people-watching while sipping on a cup of coffee.

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Exploring the 6 Different Types of Resumes

N avigating through the job market requires an impressive resume, one that highlights your skills, experience and achievements effectively. It's the initial step towards getting noticed by recruiters, and it often determines whether you'll move to the next stage of the hiring process.

The right resume format doesn't just present your qualifications but does so in a manner that aligns with your career goals and the specific job you're targeting.

This guide explores the different types of resumes and their unique features, helping you choose the format that best suits your professional profile.

Do I need a resume?

In the realm of job hunting, a resume is more than just a document — it's a marketing tool, a bridge that connects job seekers to potential employers. Its role is pivotal as it provides a concise and compelling snapshot of your professional journey. It encapsulates your work history, skills, accomplishments and unique qualities that make you an ideal candidate for the job.

Moreover, the importance of a well-structured resume is heightened due to the use of Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) in the recruitment process. These automated software applications streamline the hiring process for employers by filtering out resumes that don't meet specific criteria.

A poorly formatted resume, or one that doesn't include key terms relevant to the job description, may fail to make it past these systems. Hence, understanding different types of resumes and the strategic use of keywords are vital steps toward crafting an ATS-friendly resume that gets you closer to your dream job.

Related: Everything You Need to Know About Writing the Perfect Resume

What different types of resumes exist?

While every resume shares the common goal of selling your professional abilities, not all resumes are the same. Each type has its unique structure, purpose and benefits.

Here are the different types of resumes:

1. Chronological resume

The chronological resume, or reverse chronological resume, is a time-tested format favored by many hiring managers. This format presents your work history in reverse chronological order, with the most recent job listed first and the rest following in descending order.

In a chronological resume, each job listing typically includes the job title, the company's name, the company's location and the dates of employment. Following this information, a list of job responsibilities and accomplishments is given in bullet points. This allows hiring managers to see at a glance not only where you've worked but also what you've achieved in those roles.

This format works particularly well for job seekers with a clear career progression in a single field without significant gaps in employment. It allows recruiters to quickly see the career trajectory and understand how the applicant's experience fits with the new role.

2. Functional resume

A functional resume, also known as a skills-based resume, places the focus on skills and competencies rather than work history. This type of resume usually begins with a summary of qualifications, followed by a list of skills and examples of their use in work or other settings.

The employment history is typically listed towards the end of the resume, often providing only a basic list of positions without detailed descriptions of each role.

This format can be particularly useful for job seekers with gaps in their employment history, those who are changing careers and have skills transferable to a new industry or recent graduates with limited work experience but possess relevant skills acquired through coursework, internships or extracurricular activities.

Related: How to Build a Better Resume in 4 Easy Steps

3. Combination resume

The combination resume, or hybrid resume, merges elements from both chronological and functional resumes. It typically begins with a section highlighting your skills and achievements. This is followed by a detailed chronological work history.

This format allows you to showcase your relevant skills and accomplishments at the top of the document, helping to catch the hiring manager's eye. Following this with a chronological listing of your employment history allows the recruiter to see your work trajectory and understand the context in which you've applied your skills.

The combination resume can be effective for job seekers with a solid employment history who want to change fields or those with a robust set of transferable skills and experiences across multiple sectors.

4. Targeted resume

A targeted resume is tailored specifically to a particular job posting. Instead of a generic resume sent to multiple employers, a targeted resume aligns your skills, experience and qualifications precisely with the job description. Each section of your resume, from the objective statement to the employment history, is customized to highlight why you are the perfect fit for the specific role.

This format can be more time-consuming to create as it requires tweaking your resume for every job application. However, it can pay off, especially when applying for jobs in highly competitive industries. A well-tailored resume can stand out among a sea of generic resumes and increase your chances of securing an interview.

5. Infographic resume

An infographic resume visually presents your career history and skills using charts, graphs, images and other graphic design elements. This format can make your resume stand out and show your creativity and innovative thinking.

Infographic resumes can be particularly effective in fields such as graphic design, marketing and other creative industries. However, it's essential to remember that some applicant tracking systems (ATS) may struggle to read and process these types of resumes, so if you're applying through an ATS, it's better to stick with a more traditional format.

6. Non-traditional resumes

Non-traditional resumes break away from the standard formats and allow for more creativity. These may include video resumes, LinkedIn resumes, digital portfolios, personal websites or social resumes.

Non-traditional resumes can demonstrate your skills in a way that traditional resumes may not, such as showcasing your video editing skills through a video resume or your web design skills through a personal website.

Just as with the infographic resume, if you're applying through an ATS, a more traditional resume format would be better. Non-traditional resumes are typically best when sent directly to a hiring manager or when you're working in a creative industry that values innovative presentation.

Each of these resume formats has its strengths and is best suited to specific situations. Carefully consider your career goals, work history and the needs of the job you're applying for when choosing your resume format.

What circumstances should you consider in resume writing?

Crafting a resume can sometimes present unique challenges based on personal circumstances. Here are a few special scenarios and how to handle them:

Writing a resume for a career change

If you're making a career change, your resume should highlight transferable skills and any relevant certifications. Although your work history might not be directly related to the new field, showcasing your adaptable skills can convince hiring managers of your suitability for the role.

Handling employment gaps

Employment gaps can often be a concern for job seekers. However, these can be managed strategically on a resume. Use the space to highlight any productive activities during the gap, such as volunteer work , courses or freelance projects.

What is a mini resume?

A mini resume is a brief summary of your top skills and career highlights. It's often used for networking purposes, perhaps on a business card or LinkedIn summary. It offers an at-a-glance overview of your professional qualifications.

Related: 7 Tips for Networking

What are some additional components of a job application?

Apart from a well-structured resume, a few more elements add to the strength of your job application:

Cover letter

A cover letter serves as an introduction and provides context to your resume. It allows you to elaborate on certain points in your resume and express your enthusiasm for the job.

Just like your resume, your cover letter should be tailored to the specific job you're applying for, focusing on how your skills and experience make you an ideal candidate.

The job title on your resume can significantly influence its appeal to hiring managers. It should accurately reflect your role and responsibilities while aligning with the industry norms. Misrepresenting a job title can be detrimental to your application and professional reputation.

ATS-friendly resumes

Incorporating relevant keywords and phrases from the job description into your resume can enhance its visibility in an applicant tracking system (ATS). ATS-friendly resumes are concise, straightforward and void of complex formatting, ensuring they can be read and understood by the system.

Related: 3 Ways an ATS Can Help Your Business Source the Top Hires

What are resume builders and resume templates?

With a plethora of resources available, creating an attractive and professional resume has never been easier. Resume builders are online tools that provide step-by-step guidance to generate a well-structured resume. They offer various templates, customization options and pre-written phrases to assist you in the process.

On the other hand, resume templates serve as a predesigned framework for your resume. They come in numerous styles and formats, allowing you to choose one that aligns with your personal taste and the industry's standards.

While these tools simplify the resume creation process, remember to personalize your resume and reflect your unique professional journey accurately. A tailored resume stands out more to hiring managers than a generic, cookie-cutter one.

What are some tips for effective resume writing?

No matter which resume format you choose, following certain writing tips can optimize your resume:

Highlight relevant experience

The most effective resume isn't necessarily the one that includes all your experiences but the one that strategically highlights the most relevant ones. Avoid detailing every job you've had and focus on the ones that matter to the job you're applying for.

Include a skills section

A well-crafted skills section can be a game-changer, particularly for functional or combination resumes. Here, include hard (technical) and soft skills relevant to the job. Be specific; instead of saying "good communicator," consider "experienced in public speaking and client presentations."

Use bullet points

Use bullet points for easy readability. They help break down information into digestible pieces, ensuring that key points don't get lost in dense paragraphs. Remember to write bullet points as complete sentences with periods at the end, following our client's style preference.

Include a resume summary or objective

The top of your resume should contain a summary or an objective, a brief snapshot of your qualifications. This section should be concise yet impactful, as it's likely the first thing a hiring manager will read.

Looking forward

Crafting the perfect resume is an evolving process that may require several drafts and iterations. While these different types of resumes and their corresponding tips provide a general guideline, remember that there's no one-size-fits-all solution. The most effective resume will be the one that best showcases your unique skills, experiences and career goals.

Always revisit and revise your resume for each job application, ensuring it aligns with the specific job requirements and expectations. With a well-structured, compelling resume, you're one step closer to securing that dream job.

Explore Entrepreneur.com for more insights and resources to guide your professional journey.

Exploring the 6 Different Types of Resumes

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  1. Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

    The employer might ask for a specific type of writing like a research paper or a piece covering a certain topic. Read the employer's instructions carefully before making a writing sample selection. Consider relevant writing samples When deciding on a writing sample, you should consider only those writing pieces that are relevant to the position.

  2. Your Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

    Step 3: Consider the Classic Advice. Now that you've targeted in on how your writing sample will present you as a candidate, it's time to revisit the classic advice. First, never send a writing sample with a typo. I'm sorry if you love the document otherwise: Just imagine the hiring manager reading it with blinking sign overhead that says ...

  3. How to Create the Perfect Writing Sample to Get the Job

    Step 5: Write. It's time to put pen to paper. To get the ball rolling, start with an outline. An outline will ensure you hit on all the job posting requirements and help you move your writing forward if you get stuck. Once your writing sample is outlined, begin writing.

  4. How To Submit The Perfect Writing Sample In 2023 (With Examples)

    Key Takeaways: A writing sample shows an example of your past written work or is written in response to a prompt given by an employer. There are 3 types of writing samples: the portfolio writing sample, the pre-interview requested sample, and the impromptu writing sample. When providing a sample, research the company ahead of time to make sure ...

  5. Selecting and Submitting Writing Samples

    Submitting outdated samples (older than one year) is not a good idea. Doing so communicates that you have not kept current. Avoid samples that have no relevancy to your industry/expertise. For example, a creative or narrative writing sample would not be appropriate when applying to a scientific or technical position, whereas it might work well ...

  6. How to Create and Submit Writing Samples (Examples Included)

    For example, if you're applying to write for the fintech industry, the topic of your sample should be closely aligned with the domain. This also includes picking topics/samples that are up to date. Don't write about a technology that is two years old; in tech, two years equals three lifetimes.

  7. How to Submit a Writing Sample to Get a Job

    How to submit a writing sample. Here are several steps to follow when preparing to submit your writing sample: 1. First, ask the employer what type of sample should be submitted. In a real-life job assignment, asking questions before you start working can save everyone time and frustration. Therefore, you should not hesitate to ask questions ...

  8. Tips on Providing a Quality Writing Sample

    Employers may ask you to provide writing samples as part of your job or internship application. A writing sample provides an employer with an example of how you organize and express your thoughts. The purpose is to convince an employer you can create the kind of written materials and handle the type of work expected of an employee in the position.

  9. Guide to Submitting a Writing Sample

    Before submitting a writing sample, take time to carefully edit and polish your work. Ensure that your text is free from grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors. Check your sentence structure to make sure your ideas are clearly articulated and easy to follow. Using a style guide, like the APA or MLA style, helps maintain consistency and ...

  10. How to Make a Resume in 2024

    Create Resume. Choose a resume format carefully. In 99% of cases, we recommend the reverse-chronological format. Add the right contact details. Leave your headshot out and make sure to include your job title, a professional email address, and any relevant links.

  11. What to Write in an Email When Sending a Resume [+ Examples & Tips]

    Examples of introduction when emailing a resume: "My name is Roger Jones. I'm writing this email to express my interest in the job vacancy at Valcor". "My name is Roger Jones, and I am submitting my application for the current job opening as Financial Analyst at Valcor.". "My name is Roger Jones. I came across Valcor's job ads on ...

  12. Writing Samples: Job Application Tips

    A sample written with someone else may be appropriate if writing will be a collaborative effort at the job you're applying for. Just make sure you list yourself as a co-author. But even then, a team-written piece shouldn't be the only example you submit. "The employer is seeking samples of your work, and can't assume your role in a co ...

  13. Writing Samples & References

    Be sure to specify what the prompt was. Clearly label each submission with an appropriate title and origin (if necessary). If providing hard copies, use resume paper and/or put them in a presentation binder. Focus on quality and edit as necessary. Whatever writing sample you choose to submit should represent your best writing.

  14. Writing Samples

    In most cases, your writing sample should be around 750 words or between one and two pages. Like your resume, employers have a limited amount of time to review your writing sample. A brief, impactful writing sample is better than a long, less impressive one. Often times, employers will provide a specific page or word count they require from ...

  15. Best Resume Formats for 2024 [8+ Professional Examples]

    Our free-to-use resume builder can make you a resume in as little as 5 minutes. Just pick the template you want, and our software will format everything for you. 1. College student format. This resume format is ideal for college students because it features a detailed education section and a simple, modern design.

  16. Writing Samples

    Provide excerpts if your samples are too long. Most employers will specify how many pages or how many clips they want. If they don't, submit 2-5 pages. This can be a combination of one or more writing samples. If you want to use a paper that is longer than 5 pages, provide an excerpt with a notation at the top that tells the employer that it ...

  17. Advice When Internships/Job Applications Ask for a Writing Sample

    If sending a graded paper, make sure you received a decent grade, but do not necessarily rule out your "B" papers. Some "B" papers may have potential if you revise them before using them as your writing sample. Length. Unless otherwise stated, a good length is 2-5 pages. If you want to send a sample of a larger document, select a 2-5 ...

  18. Internship and Career Center

    Some samples might include how well you summarize complex ideas, research papers, editorials, critiques (be sure to omit names), articles, journals, and blogs. On rare occasions the employer may request a specific kind of writing sample (e.g., a case study). If you have to create one, stick very closely to the guidelines provided.

  19. Top Resume Formats: Tips and Examples of 3 Common Resumes

    Pro tip: Left-align all the text on your resume since it's the easiest format for reviewers to read. If you prefer, you can center-align your name, contact information and headline. If you do choose to center-align any text, this is the only section that should be considered. 2. Select a professional, readable font.

  20. What to Write in an Email when Sending a Resume in 2024

    5. Include a professional sign-off and don't forget your attachment (s) Let's go through key steps: Write "Sincerely," or use a synonym. Sign the resume email with your full name. If you don't have a pre-set footer, below the sign-off, include your contact details and, if necessary, basic social media handles.

  21. What to Say When Emailing a Resume (with Examples)

    Make the point of your email clear with a logical subject line - you could include the job title of the vacancy you're applying for, for example, or refer to the fact that the email is a job application or resume. Choose a professional greeting. Think "Dear [name]," or even just " [name]," rather than "Hiya" or "Greetings.".

  22. Resume email

    1. Sample email to send resume for job. This is a standard sample email for sending a resume for a job. This is a classic template that suits all circumstances, services, and sectors. It's not the most exciting, but it's quick and easy to adapt, meaning you can send more applications faster. More applications mean more chances to secure a ...

  23. How To Email a Resume to an Employer (With Example)

    2. Attach a file. The easiest way to email your resume is by attaching the file directly to the email. First, save your resume file as a Word Document (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf) file format. To do this, find "Save As" in your toolbar. From the file formats available, select Word Document or PDF.

  24. What To Write in an Email When Sending a Resume? (+Samples)

    If that's the case, then you need to stick to it. However, if there are no instructions, you should stick to the standard format for subject lines: Subject: 'Job application' - Job title, Job ID (if applicable) — Your Name. Example: Job application - Office Manager, Job ID #1553 — Ian Lumberjack.

  25. Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

    The Online Writing Lab at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out ...

  26. Resume Formats That Help Get You Job Interviews

    There are three basic resume formats to choose from. They are: Chronological - Lists your work history in order, starting with your most recent job first. Functional - Focuses on your skills and accomplishments instead of your work history. Hybrid - Places your skills and accomplishments at the top, before your work history.

  27. Exploring the 6 Different Types of Resumes

    1. Chronological resume. The chronological resume, or reverse chronological resume, is a time-tested format favored by many hiring managers. This format presents your work history in reverse ...