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How to find a research supervisor

However niche your research topic is, there’s probably someone who is already working on it - but where and how do you find them?

Where do I start?

The very first thing you’ll need to do is a lot of independent research. Hopefully you’ve already read a few articles in your research area - try looking up the authors to see which departments they’re in. You could also ask academics you’re working with at undergraduate level for their recommendations. If you don’t have any good leads to get started on, you can go straight to Google to see if you get lucky  or start by looking at a list of academic departments at Oxford to see if there’s a broad match for your subject area.

Remember that research areas can overlap different departments - our Medical Sciences Division lets you browse all supervisors by their research theme , instead of by department, to make sure you don’t miss anyone. Most department websites also let you browse all the staff, groups and projects broken down by themes, to help you narrow down your options.

How can I tell which academics would supervise a research student?

Sometimes it might not be clear whether the academic you have found is available to supervise.

You may find a list of students they’re supervising or a research group/lab they’re in charge of. They might even say something on their webpage about whether they’re available to supervise.

If you’re not sure, you can still make contact (if you do actually need a supervisor lined up — read on for more on this) to explain your interest in their research and that you’re looking for a supervisor in this area, because they might able to recommend someone.

What do I do next?

It’s always a good idea to make sure that where you’re applying has the right expertise to support your research, but every academic department has its own policy on whether you should go a step further and contact potential supervisors. It’s usually necessary in the sciences, and often optional in humanities and social sciences — check out the How to apply section for your course page and check ‘Do I need to contact anyone before I apply?’

The next part involves, yes, more reading and prep — but we’re nearly there now, and we’ve got our research question: Why is this person the best person to supervise your research?

Understand what they do

Now you have a person, start with their profile on the academic department’s website and go down the rabbit hole. You’re preparing to discuss their research and your interests, as well as developing an increasingly detailed picture of whether and how those things fit together.

If you prep well, it’ll come through in your email and help to differentiate your email from dozens of others your person might get.

Read their publications, look at their website, see if they have a X (Twitter) account. X (Twitter) is popular with research academics (you can try TikTok but we’re not making promises) and they might have posted links to their recent work or opportunities to study with them (maybe even fully funded opportunities).

Contacting a potential supervisor

Drafting the email.

Your email should be polite, concise and well-written. It will explain your interest in the supervisor's research and what you want from them, including when you’re looking to start your DPhil/PhD.

Your interest in their work needs to be well-informed and specific.

It needs to be individually tailored to the person you’re writing to. This means your interest in their work needs to be well-informed and specific. How you connect their work and yours will really depend on your research area, but consider:

  • Is one of their publications going to be key to the work you want to do? Are there open questions in their work that you’re hoping to answer? Have you identified a gap in this area you want to contribute to?
  • Do they work with an archive or facility that you’re looking to use in your research? Do you have research experience in a project with similar aims or using similar techniques to theirs?

You need to make the case, as briefly as you can, that you have the right skills and background to work in this supervisor's research area. Is there something you can easily point to as evidence of your achievements and commitment to the subject area - mentoring, funding or an award you’ve received, an outstanding grade or ranking, or research experience? Don’t be immediately put off if there are relevant skills or experience you don’t have - developing new skills is an important part of a PhD, and it’s more important to show that you know which skills you’ll need and how you’ll develop them, and demonstrate an ability to do this. Academics will look at your potential to learn new skills and they’re not expecting you to know everything on day one. Look back at where you’ve come from and what you’ve already learned.

Attach your CV ( here’s some advice on writing an academic CV ), and your draft research proposal if you have one, rather than trying to go through all the detail in your email. (Make sure these are clearly labelled and not huge files, or your well-written email might get flagged as spam or a security risk.)

Before you hit send

Make sure you use the supervisor's correct title and surname here, eg ‘Dear Dr Lastname’. If you’re not sure on the title, use Google to check - if there are no hits for ‘Professor Lastname’, try looking for ‘Dr Lastname’ and other variations instead. Check the spelling of the supervisor’s name. Ask someone you trust to proofread your draft email for you - they don’t have to have a profound understanding of your subject area, just look for typos, grammar and tone.

How many potential supervisors can I contact?

A scattershot approach to finding a supervisor is not a good move. You want quality over quantity here. You can contact more than one potential supervisor, but we’d suggest only one or two at a time, and make sure you put your full effort into making a completely individual approach to anyone you contact. 

I’ve got a reply - what now?

If you've received a positive answer from your potential supervisor, that's great news! Make sure you put their name in your application (there’s a box for it). Having an enthusiastic supervisor lined up is a great start for a competitive research degree application, but remember that even the keenest supervisor can’t make you an offer on the spot.

Next you’ll need to submit your full application, to be assessed by more of our academics against our entry requirements and other people who applied.

Questions for your supervisor

You’ll spend a lot of time working with your supervisor, so this is also your chance to get a better sense of whether they’re a good fit for you. You could ask:

  • What is the funding situation?
  • Are you applying to a funded project, are there are funding opportunities they’re aware of?
  • What sort of support and training is usually offered in the first year?
  • What training in research skills is provided?
  • Will you have the chance to teach or take part in outreach activities?
  • Will you have the opportunity to go to conferences?
  • What’s their approach to supervision?

What to do with a 'no'

If you've had a reply from the academic to say that they are not able to supervise you, this might be due to the fit of your research interests or skills with their research, or it might be for reasons totally beyond their control - lack of funding, time, even lab space. If that’s the case, ask for their feedback on your application and if they can recommend anyone else who might be a potential supervisor for your work.

I didn’t get a reply - what now?

There can be all sorts of reasons that you don’t get a reply. If your department doesn’t require you to contact a supervisor before you apply, you’ll be less likely to hear back (don’t take it personally - term time can be really busy and academics can get more emails than they have time to respond to). If you do need a supervisor and you’ve done everything we’ve suggested - tailoring your email, keeping it concise, checking it carefully, making sure you’re a good fit - it’s time to think about who else to approach.

This is a lot, we know, but if you’ve done it all you’re now in a great position to finish up your research proposal or personal statement, and to make very informed decisions about which postgraduate degree programme you’re interested in. Keep up the momentum with our advice on  writing a research proposal  and have a good read of the  Application Guide , which covers everything you’ll need to know about completing the application form.

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  • v.10; 2016 Sep

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How to approach supervisors for research opportunities

Daniyal j. jafree.

a University College London Medical School, UK

Katharine Whitehurst

Shivanchan rajmohan.

b Imperial College London, UK

In this article, we use our experiences to provide tips for contacting potential supervisors, what to expect from them and how to approach them for research opportunities. With appropriate planning, you will be surprised by the number of prestigious academics who would be willing for you to join their research group, and to get you involved in a research project.

  • • Contacting potential supervisors is a time consuming process that requires a great deal of organisation.
  • • Be proactive in your approach.
  • • The first email is very important, as is the meeting that may follow.
  • • Choose carefully and take a holistic approach when choosing your supervisor to ensure you have the best possible research experience.

1. Why contact a supervisor and how can I do it?

Undergraduate and postgraduate students may be very keen on research, and eager to take up opportunities benefitting them in the future on their paths to become academic clinicians, surgeons and beyond.

After selecting a particular topic of interest to pursue research in, the selection of a good supervisor is critical, as the working relationship you build with your supervisor can determine the success of this research.

To acquire the email addresses of some of the country's top lecturers and academics, all that is required is to go onto their respective university websites. It is customary to email these potential supervisors for research opportunities: be it for summer research, a future BSc project or a prospective PhD.

2. Planning

There are several considerations one should make before contacting potential supervisors. It is important to carefully plan both the people you contact, and the emails you send:

  • • Firstly, identify your own interests. What are you aiming to achieve with your research e.g.: Are you looking to contact supervisors because you would like to undertake your BSc Project on deep brain stimulation? Or perhaps a PhD in neural tube defects?
  • • Identify academics within your institution relevant to your chosen interest. Your university may have a research portal that you can use to find researchers within particular fields. An example is University College London's (UCL) IRIS Research Portal, which makes it really easy to draw up a list of potential supervisors for research you are interested in getting involved with.
  • • Draw up a list of potential supervisors and perform relevant background reading about each one. Sometimes researchers can have their own websites in which you can find more details about their work and research interests. It may also be wise to read some of their latest publications, accessible via PubMed. Not only does this give you a better idea as to their speciality of work, but it also shows commitment if you do establish contact with them.

3. Is it okay to contact other potential supervisors?

Medical students, particularly at an early career stage, may have multiple interests, and may wish to enquire about potential research opportunities with different supervisors. However, when emailing and meeting with supervisors, it should be made clear from the outset that other supervisors are also being contacted. This transparency is important to avoid any future misunderstanding. If a careful approach is taken, most supervisors are understanding. A good supervisor will appreciate that students are simply expressing interest, and enquiring with different supervisors to determine if potential projects and research experience align more strongly with their interests and aspirations.

4. How to approach the first email

Think of the first email to the supervisor as a cover letter. The email should demonstrate why you are a suitable student for the chosen research, and why the supervisor should take you on as a research student. The following points should be considered prior to composing the email. These points may seem trivial, but could make the difference between obtaining a reply or not:

  • • Email etiquette is imperative. Start the email with “Dear” and end it with “Kind Regards”. Spelling and grammar errors are to be avoided.
  • • Good formatting is also essential. Choose an appropriate font size and style. Allow for adequate spacing between lines and between paragraphs.
  • • A clear subject title should be considered. This should attract a supervisor's attention to you as a potential research student. This may relate to the intended research position i.e.: ‘Interest in Wellcome Trust PhD in Regenerative Medicine’

Moreover, the email should be structured coherently. Through the following points, we propose a structure which can be implemented when contacting potential supervisors for research opportunities.

  • ○ State who you are and what you do, or what you intend to do. For example “My name is Dan, I am a 2 nd  year medical student looking to undertake a BSc in Surgical Sciences next academic year”
  • ○ It might be beneficial to state how you came to hear about the supervisor i.e.: did you attend one of his or her lectures? Mention whether you found it particularly interesting! Additionally, if the supervisor was recommended by another contact, then consider mentioning this here.
  • ○ It is useful to put forward an objective e.g.: if you are thinking of applying for a BSc Prize, Scholarship or aspire to present your work at a particular conference, then it is worth mentioning this.
  • ○ The main part of the email is arguably the most important. Here, as with any cover letter, you should promote yourself as a strong candidate for research in the supervisor's lab.
  • ○ It is imperative to attach a curriculum vitae (CV) with the email. Highlight the most important points of your CV, such as research experience and commitment to research. Previous presentations and publications are useful to demonstrate a strong track record, and show yourself to be a good potential candidate for their research group.
  • ○ It is useful to mention your interest in the supervisor's field, and why you want to undertake research in their lab. You may wish to mention any publications of theirs you have read.
  • ○ If the research you intend to pursue requires funding, state the source (e.g. self-funded, received a grant, etc.). However this may not always be applicable or relevant.
  • ○ The end of the email should reinforce and summarise why you think you are suitable for the research role. You may even wish to request a meeting with the supervisor to discuss the projects he or she will have available for you.
  • ○ It would be worth mentioning support you may have received i.e.: if your department has nominated you for an award, it would greatly strengthen your claim.
  • ○ Ideas and aspirations for the future are useful to add here i.e.: I hope to develop into an academic neurosurgeon with a focus on deep brain stimulation.

5. Why haven't I got a reply?

Response rates from supervisors are variable, as many students underestimate the importance of the first email in impressing themselves as viable candidates for research. Many supervisors are extremely busy and have other commitments outside their academia. Therefore, it is okay to resend the email after a period of time, one week for example, as it is easy for your email to be ‘buried’ beneath more recent emails received by the recipient.

6. The meeting

It is not uncommon for potential supervisors to offer a meeting with themselves or their colleagues to further discuss your interests, aspirations for your research and the possibility of performing research under their supervision. If a supervisors is particularly busy, he or she may request that you organize a meeting with a different member of staff within their research group instead. This is both an opportunity to learn more about the department and its research, and to learn more about the potential supervisor and whether they are the right choice for you!

  • ○ Though it is not always necessary, it is useful to read some of the publications that your supervisor has contributed to. It sounds impressive in a meeting if you already have knowledge in the subject field, and it leaves more time in the meeting to discuss topics of your particular interest rather than having to explain previous work to you to put the research in context
  • ○ Reread your email. Your potential supervisor may ask you some questions regarding what you have mentioned i.e.: how did you develop your interest of deep brain stimulation?
  • ○ Sometimes, it can be appropriate to bring examples of your previous work For example, it may be advantageous for students to bring printouts of their previous publications to their meetings.
  • ○ Do not underestimate the importance of a good first impression. Appear well-dressed, enthusiastic and motivated!
  • ○ The meeting is a great way to assess your potential supervisor and whether they are the right choice for you. Assess how engaging the meeting is, whether the topic is really what you thought it would be and whether there is scope for a project you want to undertake with this supervisor.
  • ○ You should also be considering other aspects of the supervisor. Are they listening to you? How much are they interested in you as a prospective student? Though these seem like minor points, but you should be considering these, particularly if the research is part of a BSc, MSc or PhD. In these cases, you will spend a substantial amount of time under their supervision.
  • ○ How much time is the supervisor willing to put into your development? Many high-proline supervisors will likely be extremely busy, and will not be able to contribute a significant amount of time to your development as a researcher. We strongly believe the best supervisors to be reputable in their field, but still able to dedicate time to teach you the appropriate research techniques, arranging meetings with you to monitor progress, teaching you how to write dissertations and so on.
  • ○ Consider further opportunities that your supervisor may offer you – will your supervisor allow you to contribute to some of their manuscripts for publication? Will he or she allow you to undertake further research opportunities and become involved in other projects within their research group?
  • ○ For laboratory research, it may be appropriate to ask the supervisor if you can look around the laboratory and meet the research team, as it is likely that a majority of your time will be spent in the laboratory, and majority of the ‘hands-on’ supervision will be by other members of the laboratory team.
  • ○ Consider writing all the information you gathered from the meeting down onto a table, such that when after meeting several supervisors with several available projects you can compare and contrast each to select one for your research intentions.
  • ○ If possible, it is worth using your contacts or other sources to find supervisors. If several previous students particularly recommend a particular supervisor, then it is a very good sign!

7. Selecting your supervisor

The selection of a supervisor is a personal decision This decision should be considered carefully, taking the aforementioned points into account and weighing them up. The decision is even more critical if you are electing to spend a longer amount of time for the research, such as for an MSc or PhD. Choose carefully!

Conflicts of interest

None to declare.

The authors received no funding for this article.

Ethical approval

No ethical approval was necessary.

Author contribution

DJ conceived the article and created the first draft. KW and SR were responsible for critical review and approval of the final draft.

DJ – the corresponding author.

The University of Edinburgh home

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Postgraduate study

How to find a research supervisor

Check that the University can provide a suitable supervisor to support you while you undertake your research.

We recommend that you get in touch informally with your prospective supervisor or, more generally, the relevant school, before you submit a formal application.

Some schools may ask that you submit a research proposal before you formally apply, but others prefer you to submit a formal application at first – you should check the information provided by the school or research institute offering the programme you are interested to find out how they would prefer you to contact them in the first instance.

Research supervisors are either staff members of the University, or based in one of the research units or institutions associated with the University.

Supervisors are in high demand and may not be able to respond to your enquiry immediately, so please be patient. Some may already be supervising the maximum number of PhD students they can, and won’t be able to take on any new students.

To find a potential supervisor:

Find the school or research institute that is most relevant to your area of interest. If your proposed research is interdisciplinary, you may need to look at more than one school  -  List of our schools and departments  

  • Browse through the staff profiles on the school or institute website     
  • Check the procedure for contacting the potential supervisor with your initial enquiry or research proposal    
  • Check the availability of facilities and resources necessary for your research    
  • If you can’t find this information, or if you have further questions, you should contact the school's administrator

Multidisciplinary research

We welcome applications from students with interdisciplinary research interests.

You should contact supervisors in the areas you would like to research. You can discuss the possibility of being supervised collaboratively by people in different academic units.

The University of Edinburgh hosts a number of Global Academies, which facilitate interdisciplinary research across the world.

Global Academies

Research proposals

You will almost certainly need to write a research proposal in order to apply for your PhD.

Talk to your supervisor about whether you need to do this. You should also check the degree finder to see if you are expected to include anything specific in your proposal.

Our guide to writing a research proposal will take you through the process step-by-step:

How to write a research proposal

Finding a supervisor

A supervisor is a professor who oversees your research and the development of your thesis. They provide mentorship, support, and guidance throughout your studies. 

Your relationship with your supervisor will be an important factor in your experience and success as a graduate student. Focus on finding a supervisor who shares your research interests, complements your research and learning style, and supports you in your research and academic goals.

Learn more about supervisory roles and responsibilities in the  Guide for Graduate Research and Supervision .

This video will help you as you prepare to research, contact, and select a supervisor for your graduate studies.

Do you need a supervisor?

Looking for a supervisor, contacting potential supervisors, meeting potential supervisors.

Supervisors are not required for Waterloo professional coursework and professional  online programs .

Some research-based master's and doctoral programs require a supervisor prior to applying while others may assign a supervisor once you have started in your program. Contact your department/program  graduate co-ordinator  to determine if having a supervisor before you apply is required for your program.

Your graduate coordinator will be able to answer questions about program requirements, the admission process, supplemental materials, and funding opportunities.

Visit Faculty or Department websites to learn more about faculty members in your desired field. Faculty profiles or websites will often provide details about conference participation, course instruction, publications, and CVs. Consider how your research interests and experience may intersect with a faculty member's and identify opportunities to expand you knowledge in a desired area.

Use your findings to create a shortlist of potential supervisors to explore further.

The next step is to contact the supervisors on your list. Be sure to tailor your email for each potential supervisor. Your goal is to stand out and generate interest in working with you.

  • Use proper letter format, formal salutations – Professor/Dr. (last name) and close with “Yours sincerely” followed by your full name and contact information
  • Attach your CV and current transcripts
  • Specify the program for which you are applying
  • Ask if they are accepting graduate students under their supervision for your desired admit term
  • If you already have funding or a scholarship, specify the source, value, and duration
  • Explain your interest in graduate studies, your academic and career goals, and your research experience
  • Explain your interest in the faculty member and discuss how your research aligns with theirs (this can be a great way to differentiate yourself and make a strong case for your candidacy)
  • Suggest a follow-up meeting with options for date and time

Once you hear back from an interested potential supervisor, you may wish to arrange for a phone call or virtual meeting. We suggest using that time to learn more about the faculty member’s experience, expectations, and availability.

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  • Research degrees

Find a supervisor or research project

Graduate researchers at the University of Melbourne need at least two supervisors – one designated as the principal supervisor. Whether you want to join an established project with an assigned supervisory team or find supervisors for your own research project, the questions below may help you determine who is best placed to support your research journey:

  • Do they have expertise relevant to your intended research project?
  • Do they share your passion for your chosen topic?
  • Are they well connected with other researchers?
  • Have they developed skills in people management and mentoring?
  • What is their reputation amongst current and past PhD candidates?
  • Will you work well together? Consider your respective personalities and communication styles.

It’s worth discovering more about their supervision style, availability and accessibility, as well as the value of their feedback. Then search our list of 2500+ experts for research supervision or our list of available research projects.

Find an Expert

Find a research project

Your supervisors’ role

Your supervision team will:.

  • Guide and support you through all stages of your candidature and ensure you have access to necessary  resources and facilities to complete your research project.
  • Assist you to develop your research topic, questions, methodology and milestones for successful completion.
  • Provide constructive feedback on your written work and oral presentations within a reasonable agreed timeframe and provide detailed, specific and constructive feedback on thesis drafts.
  • Mentor you through the research process, providing support as you undertake new  tasks, and ensure that administrative work like ethics applications are completed or responded to in a timely way.
  • Maintain an agreed schedule of regular individual meetings with you.
  • Help you identify appropriate skills training and  professional development opportunities , including academic skills, external engagement (internships, industry mentoring programs), sessional teaching and PhD Program participation.
  • Help you  grow your professional networks by encouraging and supporting you to engage with the research community, both locally and internationally.
  • Be accessible to a reasonable extent via email, online or in person, should support be needed outside of the agreed meeting schedule.
  • Promptly attend to administrative tasks like progress reviews, requests for leave of absence or candidature variations.
  • Be familiar with, introduce you to and provide advice on all relevant University policies, including the  Graduate Research Training Policy and those on the conduct of research, ethical requirements, safe working practices, intellectual property and authorship.
  • Adhere to the  Principles of Respectful Supervisory Relationships , be considerate of wellbeing and, where appropriate, alert you to wellbeing services.
  • Advise on where to seek confidential advice and explain the process of making a formal complaint if difficult situations cannot be resolved, understanding that you may consult other individuals, including the Advisory Committee chair or confidential advisors, if you wish to raise any concerns.
  • Different members of your supervision team will contribute to your supervision in different ways but should work as a team to support you.

Advisory committee

Your supervision team is supported by your Advisory Committee , which should comprise of at least three people, including the advisory committee chair and your supervisors, which will be established at commencement.

The committee has a formal role in monitoring the progress of your research project and an informal role in providing you with support and advice.

If you are experiencing issues or have matters you feel you cannot raise with your supervisors, you should consult an advisory committee member in the first instance.The roles and responsibilities of supervisors and advisory committee members are also outlined in the Graduate Research Training Policy .

Looking for something else?

Explore research areas.

Discover your graduate research options at the University of Melbourne.

Scholarships

The University of Melbourne offers generous and comprehensive scholarship opportunities to recognise talent and support graduate researchers.

How to apply

Find out how to apply for graduate research at the University of Melbourne.

School of Graduate Studies

Find a supervisor.

If you’re enrolled in a thesis-based graduate program, you will conduct your own research under the guidance of a supervisor. You are responsible for selecting your research topic and seeking out a potential supervisor.

The supervisory relationship is a foundation of graduate education, particularly in the doctoral-stream programs.

The success of good supervision is a shared responsibility. It depends on both student and supervisor communicating well, being tolerant and understanding, and each holding the other to high standards. The graduate unit (department, centre, or institute) also plays a role, providing clarity and consistency of expectations, upholding academic standards, administering the program fairly and effectively, and intervening where necessary to help resolve problems.

Prof. Arthur Ripstein

“ I enjoy teaching graduate courses and seminars, but my favourite part is supervising dissertations.

Choose a supervisor.

The responsibility to find a supervisor, in most graduate units, rests with the student. Securing a supervisor may however even be a condition of admission. Some graduate units assign a supervisor, typically in master’s programs. How do you know? Check your graduate handbook or with your graduate administrator.

Full members of graduate faculty may serve as the sole or major thesis supervisor for either doctoral or master’s students in the graduate unit while associate members of graduate faculty may serve as members of a doctoral supervisory committee, but may only be the sole or major supervisor for master’s students.

Faculty members A to Z listing .

Get Advice & Support

Talk to your graduate unit. Read your graduate handbook. Know what procedures your graduate unit has in place to help you find a supervisor, or to change a supervisor in the unlikely event that becomes necessary.

The SGS Graduate Supervision Guidelines – Students is a good resource, a set of best practices, general guidelines, policies, and suggestions that provide direction on choosing a supervisor, establishing a supervisory committee, and maintaining a productive working relationship among all three. The guidelines include a supervision checklist for students.

Identify Clear Expectations

Your supervision relationship will benefit from having clear, shared expectations with your supervisor. Set timelines for each stage of work. Identify preferred methods of communication. Discuss intellectual property issues. Complete an intellectual property awareness form . Identify publication expectations and other matters.

Know Your Deadlines

All doctoral students are required to have a supervisor and supervisory committee in place by the end of the second year of their program. Some graduate units have earlier deadlines. Securing a supervisor, supervisory committee and an approved thesis proposal is a requirement for doctoral students to achieve candidacy in their program. Know your deadlines. Compliance with the deadlines is required to maintain satisfactory progress and good academic standing in your degree program.

Maintain Healthy Supervisory Relations

A doctoral student is expected to meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year, and more often if the committee so requires. Supervisory Committee meetings are vital for monitoring doctoral progress in a doctoral program.

The supervisory committee consists of your supervisor and at least two faculty members. Its role is to provide support to you and your supervisor by broadening and deepening the range of expertise and experience available, and by offering advice about, and assessment of, your work. Graduate students who establish their supervisory committees early in their programs and who meet with their committees regularly, tend to complete their degree programs successfully, and sooner than students who wait to establish their committees.

Further information on maintaining good academic standing and supervision is found in the General Regulations section of the SGS Calendar and on the policies and guidelines page of this website.

Recognize Your Supervisor

Do you know a great graduate supervisor who has made a big difference in a student’s development as a researcher and in pursuing future academic and professional careers? The JJ Berry Smith Award for Doctoral Supervision recognizes outstanding performance in the multiple roles associated with doctoral supervision. It is awarded annually to an active faculty member who, over a minimum of 15 years, has demonstrated excellence in supervision at U of T. Recognize your supervisor.

When Problems Arise

Should a problem arise in your supervisory relationship, try to resolve the difficulty amicably through informal discussion first. If that does not resolve the problem, there are several avenues to pursue within your graduate unit: the supervisory committee, the Graduate Coordinator and the Chair of the graduate unit. If the graduate unit is unable to find a satisfactory solution, advice may be sought from the Vice-Dean, Students, School of Graduate Studies. If all else fails, and if the nature of the issue is academic, you have recourse to a formal academic appeal.

The Australian National University

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Finding a supervisor

  • Finding a supervisor

Step-by-step help to find a research supervisor in ANU Science, Health and Medicine.

What is a research supervisor?

Your supervisor is an academic staff member who guides you throughout your research, acting as your primary academic adviser and mentor. A supervisor may work with:

  • Undergraduate students pursuing research projects, including special projects or a summer research project
  • Honours students
  • Postgraduate coursework students: Master (Coursework) students doing a research project in a course or Master (Advanced) students working on a thesis  

What does a research supervisor do?

Your supervisor is your primary contact for your research project. The supervisor will also assist you with advice, guidance and criticism, and can help you to define and achieve your personal academic goals.  Your supervisor will:

  • Assist you in selecting and defining the scope of a suitable project topic or problem.
  • Assist you in devising a schedule for the project work.
  • Guide you in the selection and application of appropriate data collection and analysis procedures and advise on the solution of any difficulties that arise.
  • Advise on matters of thesis or report content, organisation and writing, including the timely provision of comments, written and oral, on drafts or portions of the written work.
  • Meet frequently with you to discuss and evaluate each stage of the project.
  • Monitor your progress and advise you when progress is unsatisfactory.
  • Assist you in gaining clearance from the ethics committee, if required.

Who can be a research supervisor?

Research supervisors are experienced researchers who have the skills to guide a student's project.  A supervisor may be the leader of research group or laboratory; for example, in the Research School of Biology, research  groups  are listed on the website. The leader's last name is used is used to identify the research group. Typically, a research group leader is a professor.

Students may also be supervised by:

  • a post-doctoral fellow, post-doc for short, who has a PhD works for 2+ years in a research group to get more experience
  • a staff researcher, who has a PhD and a permanent position in a research group

In addition, an undergraduate student or honours student may be formally supervised by a professor but work with a post-graduate student on a daily basis.

When should I start looking for a research supervisor?

In general, the timing of when you should look for a research supervisor depends on what type of research experience you are looking for and what research school you want to work in. Our  sample research projects  can give you an idea of what types of projects students work on. These lists are a helpful source of information but may not be current.

Below is more information for:

  • Undergraduate students -  are advised to approach potential supervisors the semester before beginning a research project. Yet, it is never too early to start learning about what research is being done in your field. You may become fascinated with a topic or type of research that is completely new to you!  Take every opportunity you have to ask academic staff and students about their research. You can talk to your friends who are doing research, your instructors, course demonstrators and tutors, and any post-graduate students you interact with.
  • Honours students -  Before you apply for Honours, you can talk to your friends who are doing research, instructors, course demonstrators and tutors, and any post-graduate students you interact with to learn more about their research.  You can review the research being done at the research school, see what is interesting to you, and what opportunities are available.  Once you begin, you should talk to your school's Honours Convenor as soon as you begin to consider Honours to find out the details for your program.
  • Coursework (Advanced) students -  Before you apply and during your first year, you can review the research being done at the research school, see what is interesting to you, and what opportunities are available. Once you begin your courses, you can talk to your friends who are doing research, instructors, and any other post-graduate students you interact with to learn more about their research. Attending seminars is also a helpful way to see what research is interesting to you.

Selected content from the  Honours Handbook .

Do I need to have a research proposal before I contact potential supervisors?

As an undergraduate, honours, or postgraduate coursework student, it is not necessary for you to have a complete research proposal before contacting a researcher. You do, however, need to do your background research and be familiar with what topics the researcher works on.

What are my responsibilities when I have a supervisor?

Your responsibilities are to:

  • Communicate regularly and clearly with your supervisor.
  • If you are not sure what your supervisor is trying to communicate, ask questions!
  • Plan your research program and budget with your supervisor(s).
  • Participate in regular meetings and/or research group activities.
  • Prepare in advance for consultations or meetings.
  • Take responsibility for the final results of your work. Your supervisor can and will guide you, but you must take ownership of the project.

What do all these titles mean?

The different titles can be quite confusing!  The titles tell you something, though, about your potential supervisor's career path. In Australia, a science researcher or professor's career path could look like this:

  • Undergraduate degree (3 years of coursework and possibly independent research or research-based courses)
  • Honours degree (1 year of research following on after the 3 year undergraduate degree)
  • Master degree (1-2 years coursework and/or research)
  • PhD (Doctor of Philosophy; 3+ years of research)
  • Post-doctoral fellow/researcher (Post-doc; 2+ years of research)
  • Staff or senior researcher/Lecturer/Senior Lecturer
  • Assistant Professor (A/Professor)
  • Associate Professor (Assoc. Professor)

Please note: anyone with a “Dr.” before a surname has a PhD but might not be a professor.  You can find more information at the Wikipedia page  Academic Ranks (Australia and New Zealand) .

How to find a supervisor

Step 1. think about your interests, preferences, and goals.

It is fine if you don’t have answers to these questions, but take some time to reflect.

  • What topics, classes, seminars or professors have caught your interest?
  • Why do you want to do research?
  • What are your short and long-term goals and how does doing research fit in with those goals?
  • Do you prefer to work independently or in a group?
  • Do you think you’d prefer working in a small research group, or in a large one? 

Step 2. Explore current research at ANU

You need to know what topics or projects might interest you.

  • Read through schools’ websites: check the priority research areas and look for research opportunities on the  sample research projects page .
  • Network with course convenors, honours convenors, master convenors, students, tutors, demonstrators, and friends. Ask for advice on who is doing work in your area of interest and experiences other people have had that you might learn from.

Step 3. Prepare to contact potential supervisors

  • Look at research groups’ websites. Is it a big research group or a small one?
  • Read several papers from the research group. To find the most recent papers, do an online search, as well as looking at the information and papers on the ANU website, since the ANU sites may not be current.
  • Prepare a list of questions you have about the group and the research.
  • If possible, talk to other students to learn more about the supervisor’s expectations for students and style of supervision.  Would this style work for you?

Step 4. Contact 2-3 potential supervisors

If you choose to approach a potential supervisor after a class meeting or seminar, you should still do your background preparation.

If you email a potential supervisor, don’t take it personally if they don't respond immediately.

  • Use your ANU email address. By policy, ANU academic and professional staff can only communicate with ANU students through an ANU email address.
  • Sign the email using your legal name, as well as any name a convenor may know you by.
  • Attach a CV and your Statement of Results (from ISIS).

See  How to email a potential supervisor  or  Emailing professors .

Step 5. Meet with potential supervisors

You may want to ask about the researcher’s:

  • Research interests
  • Plans for the project you are interested in
  • Preferred supervisory style (How often do they like to meet? Exactly how independent do they expect a student to be? Does this match with your preferences?)
  • Expectations for a student
  • Experience working with undergraduate, Honours or postgraduate coursework students
  • Meetings with their research students (lab meeting or research group meeting) and if you could attend one (going to a research group meeting can show you what the group's culture is like).

The potential supervisor may ask you about your:

  • Academic interests (this is another opportunity to show that you read the researcher's website, as well as a few papers)
  • Preparation (how you did in relevant courses, any research experience, technical skills)
  • Education and career goals.

Step 6. After the meeting

Send a brief, formal email thanking the potential supervisor for the meeting.

Once you decide on a project with a supervisor if you have discussed projects with other supervisors, as a courtesy, please let the other potential supervisor know that you are working with another researcher.

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Become a Graduate Student

  • Finding a research supervisor

Graduate students in research-intensive programs (i.e., one that requires a thesis) will often need a faculty supervisor.

We strongly encourage you check with your graduate program of interest to see if a supervisor is needed, and to find a supervisor at the time of application if necessary. This will increase your chances at admission, and allow for a better and more productive graduate student experience .

Finding a Supervisor

There are a few ways you can find a supervisor:

  • If you are an undergraduate student at Memorial, consider the senior courses you are taking or have taken that interest you the most. If the subject matter is something that you can envision studying further independently, talk to the course instructor about either supervising you for a master’s project, or advice on who might be looking for graduate students in that area.
  • Talk to current graduate students about their experience working with their supervisors or other faculty members in your discipline. 
  • If you completed your prior degree at a different university, you have a few options. Try reviewing the faculty directory on the departmental website . They should offer a list of all active faculty members, their research interests, publications, current and past graduate students, and contact information. Try looking at the faculty directors of multiple departments that might be related to your field of study.
  • Do a search using www.yaffle.ca , using keywords that best describe your research interests. The search results should yield several names of faculty members in your area of interest along with their contact information. You can also search for faculty members who are specifically seeking graduate students and willing to supervise . Please keep in mind not all of Memorial’s graduate supervisors are listed on this site.
  • Contact the Graduate Officer of the academic unit or program you are interested in, and ask for suggestions on faculty members who might be looking for students. Graduate Officers can also provide important information on admission and program requirements, the application review process, and funding awarded for students in research programs.

Contacting a Supervisor

When contacting potential supervisors, it is important to make a good first impression. We suggest you take the following steps:

  • Review the faculty member’s information online and become familiar with their research. Consider their publications as well as those of their graduate students.
  • Write a concise introductory email to the faculty member you would like to work with. Introduce yourself, your academic credentials (GPA, academic awards, research experience, etc.), and the kind of research you would like to pursue and the reason for it. Tailor your email to the individual recipient and do not send a general email to multiple faculty members.
  • Use formal salutations (“Dr./Professor” followed by last name) and close (“Yours sincerely” followed by your name and contact information). Attach your current CV and transcripts.
  • If you have your own funding (e.g., external scholarship), specify the source and amount you have been awarded.
  • Advise them you have applied for a graduate program at Memorial University and ask them if they might be interested in serving as your supervisor for a program.
  • Ask for further discussion by phone, videoconference or in person (if possible).
  • If you don’t receive an immediate response, do not be discouraged. Faculty members might just need some time to review and get back to you, especially in the middle of a busy semester or during the summer if they are in the field or away at a conference.

Questions to Ask a Supervisor

When communicating with potential supervisors, it is important to discuss a few topics in addition to research interests and plans:

  • Most full-time graduate students in research programs must be funded. Ask about funding levels for your program and options for scholarships in your field.
  • Ask about potential start date for your program and whether they might be away on research leave at any point during your study period.
  • Discuss the work of the faculty member’s current and past graduate students. What kind of research are current graduate students doing now, and what kind of careers do former graduate students now have?
  • What kind of professional skills training opportunities will you have as a graduate student? Will you be able to publish, present at conferences, and network with peers?
  • What is the faculty member’s supervisory style? Do they meet with graduate students frequently, or expect graduate students to work fairly independently?

If you have any other questions, please reach out. The School of Graduate Studies, as well as 60 academic units across all of Memorial’s campuses, are committed to making the admissions process clear and seamless. In addition to our Graduate Officers, who can serve as invaluable resources for you, our dedicated team of professional staff are available to answer any question you might have, within one business day.

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Connecting with a Supervisor

How to find and connect with potential supervisors.

Your relationship with your supervisor will be one of the most important factors contributing to the success of your graduate studies. Taking the time to find a supervisor who will complement your research and learning style will help to ensure the success of this relationship. Below are some important considerations to assist you in your efforts.

Do you need to select a supervisor?

Every department at McGill has different admissions procedures. While some will expect you to connect with a potential supervisor prior to applying, others will assign a supervisor to you after you have been accepted. Make sure to carefully read the requirements of the program into which you are applying, available on the departmental website, to find out the supervisory procedures for that department. If it is unclear, contact the Graduate Program Director to clarify.

Identify Potential Supervisors

  • Browse our Program Pages to identify the department in which your research of interest is taking place.
  • Develop a shortlist of potential supervisors from the Faculty members working in your area. In comparing them, try to identify who would be the ideal supervisor for you both in terms of research interests and teaching/learning style.
  • Review Faculty member research profiles to locate potential supervisors with research interests similar to your own. Check Departmental websites under the menu heading ‘Faculty’.
  • Think laterally – if you don’t find what you’re looking for in one department, look at the research profiles of Faculty in related fields.

What to look for

By looking at a Faculty member’s CV and talking to them as well as to their current and former students, you can get a good idea as to who might be the best supervisor for you. 

A good supervisor should be able to provide you with some direction, while allowing you to take initiative. There are a number of factors that can promote a successful supervisory relationship. These include:

  • Expertise : Are they working on your area of research?
  • Experience: Have they supervised many students before?
  • Availability : Will they be available to meet with you when you need them?
  • Research agenda : How active is their research?
  • Publishing: How often do they publish? Do they co-author with other professors in the department or with students?
  • Collegiality and interpersonal relationship: How well will you get on with each other?

Make a connection

Prior to researching and speaking to potential supervisors, make sure to contact the academic unit offering your program in order to establish a relationship. 

The Graduate Program Coordinator will be your main contact person within the unit and will provide you with pertinent information. They will answer your questions about program requirements, the admissions process, supplemental materials, funding opportunities and the procedure for finding a supervisor within the department.

When you are ready to contact potential supervisors, approaching them by email is a good initial step. Ensure that your messages are tailored to each professor, not generic. You must catch the interest of the professor quickly and make a good first impression.

  • Write a concise and professional letter.  The message should start with Dear Professor/Dr. (lastname) and end with "Yours sincerely" followed by your full name and contact information (or the formal equivalent in a message written in French). 
  • Attach your Curriculum Vitae and unofficial transcripts. Note, you may complete and submit the Canadian Common CV . State why you are writing  (e.g.  I am applying to the M.Sc. program in specify program).
  • State why you are interested in graduate studies (including career goals) and emphasize any research or leadership experience and analytical skills.
  • If you already have funding, state the amount, duration and source.
  • State why you are approaching this particular professor, and why your research interests and goals are a good match. Refer briefly to specific published articles by the professor that interest you.
  • Offer an opportunity for further discussion (teleconference, videoconference, or if you are in Montreal, an in-person interview).

Questions and issues to discuss with potential supervisors:

  • Capacity:  Does the professor currently have graduate students? Not enough? Too many? Looking for more?
  • Expectations: Working hours, frequency of student-supervisor meetings, group meetings, reports, record keeping, contribution to general duties, assistance from and to other personnel/students, and meeting program milestones.
  • Expected attendance at journal clubs, seminars, etc, aside from official requirements of the Graduate Program.
  • Financial considerations: stipend, presentation/attendance at conferences.
  • Conventions on authorship (within the norms of the discipline and McGill’s Regulation on the Conduct of Research .
  • Review of written work : extent of supervisor’s involvement with student’s presentations, thesis preparation, time frame for return of comments, etc.
  • Supervisory style: keeping in mind the questions above.
  • Student Success :   how many students have they supervised through to graduation? Have the students finished their program in good time? Have many of the students published? How have the students done in the job market?
  • Personality: trust your instincts as to whether you would be a good match.

Visit Campus

If at all possible, try to visit McGill and meet with your potential supervisor. Not only will this give you an opportunity to show them how excited you are to work together, but it will also allow you to get a sense of their personality. After identifying potential supervisors, call or email them to find out if they are taking on new students.

Away from McGill?

If you are unable to visit with your potential supervisor in person, you will need to rely on communication by phone, email or videoconference. Even if you are communicating at a distance, try to establish a personal connection. Show your potential supervisor why you are interested in working with them in particular.

Talk to current/former students

Talking to the current and former students of a potential supervisor is a good way to find out about their supervisory style, and will allow you to determine whether you work in a similar way.

  • If you are visiting McGill, consider meeting up with some students in person to discuss working with this supervisor.
  • If not, ask either the professor or the Graduate Program Coordinator/Secretary to provide you with email addresses or phone numbers.

Questions to ask current/former students

  • What has been their experience working with this supervisor? Is the supervisor readily available when questions or problems arise?
  • What is expected of them as graduate students working under this supervisor? Does the supervisor take a hands-on or laissez-faire approach to supervision?
  • What do they feel are this supervisor’s strengths in terms of graduate supervision?
  • What do they feel are their weaknesses in terms of graduate supervision?

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Institut national de la recherche scientifique

We teach the next generation of researchers to develop scientific, social, and technological innovations.

We find solutions through interdisciplinary research and industry or public and community partnerships.

We play an active role in Québec's economic, social, and cultural development.

Comment trouver un directeur de recherche à l'INRS

  • Your Research Supervisor

How to Find a Research Supervisor

How do you go about finding a professor to supervise you during your master’s or doctorate? Here are three ways to proceed, which you can also use if you’re seeking a supervisor for a research internship or postdoctoral fellowship.

Questionnaire trouver ma direction de recherche

1. Answer the Find Your Research Supervisor questionnaire

Based on your answers to three questions, the Find Your Research Supervisor questionnaire will suggest research projects in line with your objectives as well as faculty members with whom you could study.

If you’re looking for a topic for your master’s thesis or doctoral project, our questionnaire puts you on the right track. It will help you find master’s or PhD projects of interest and faculty members who can supervise you during your graduate studies.

how to find a research supervisor

2. Consult the list of master’s and doctoral research projects available for future students

A good way to find out about student research opportunities is to browse our list of master’s and PhD projects.

It also gives you a good idea about our areas of expertise and is an effective way to identify faculty members with research interests similar to yours.

INRS faculty members regularly invite master’s and doctoral students to join their teams to conduct innovative research in basic and applied science.

Projects are offered all year long, but there are more options available in the spring.

Browse the list of projects for a look at the wealth of research activities and diversity of topics addressed at INRS. Found a project that catches your eye? Submit your application!

Marie-Soleil CLoutier, professeure à l'INRS

3. Browse the faculty directory

Browse the list of our professors to find someone to supervise you during your graduate studies. Their faculty profiles will tell you about their research areas.

Use research criteria such as “Training openings” and the search bar woth keywords to fine tune your search.

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Applicants to Master’s and Doctoral degrees are not affected by the recently announced cap on study permits. Review more details

The supervisor is the key person in a thesis-based graduate degree program. The principal role of the supervisor is to help students achieve their scholastic potential and to chair the student’s Supervisory Committee. The Supervisor will provide reasonable commitment, accessibility, professionalism, stimulation, guidance, respect and consistent encouragement to the student. Learn more

Graduate programs have different expectations regarding prospective students contacting faculty members. Some require commitment of a faculty member as thesis supervisor prior to applying while others assign supervisors in the first year. Please review the requirements for each program in the degree listing under the heading "Admission Information & Requirements" in step 3 "Prepare Application" under "Thesis Supervision".

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Reaching Out Tips

Complete these steps before you reach out to a faculty member.

  • Familiarize yourself with program requirements. You want to learn as much as possible from the information available to you before you reach out to a faculty member. Be sure to visit the graduate degree program listing and program-specific websites.
  • Check whether the program requires you to seek commitment from a supervisor prior to submitting an application. For some programs this is an essential step while others match successful applicants with faculty members within the first year of study. This is either indicated in the program profile under "Admission Information & Requirements" - "Prepare Application" - "Supervision" or on the program website.
  • Identify specific faculty members who are conducting research in your specific area of interest.
  • Read up on the faculty members in the program and the research being conducted in the department.
  • Familiarize yourself with their work, read their recent publications and past theses/dissertations that they supervised. Be certain that their research is indeed what you are hoping to study.
  • Do not send non-specific, mass emails to everyone in the department hoping for a match.
  • Address the faculty members by name. Your contact should be genuine rather than generic.
  • Include a brief outline of your academic background, why you are interested in working with the faculty member, and what experience you could bring to the department. The supervision enquiry form guides you with targeted questions. Ensure to craft compelling answers to these questions.
  • Highlight your achievements and why you are a top student. Faculty members receive dozens of requests from prospective students and you may have less than 30 seconds to pique someone’s interest.
  • Convey the specific ways you are a good fit for the program.
  • Convey the specific ways the program/lab/faculty member is a good fit for the research you are interested in/already conducting.
  • Be enthusiastic, but don’t overdo it.

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Find your research opportunity.

In order for us to process your enquiry* you must include the following documentation:

  • Curriculum Vitae (including all relevant research experience and any publications).
  • Complete academic transcripts for all of your degrees, including all final grades.
  • An initial research proposal: In no more than 2000 words demonstrate how  your research experience aligns with the supervisor’s and why you’re interested in this opportunity.

You’ll need to tailor your research proposal to each opportunity you enquire about. Follow our Research Proposal Guidelines .

*Please note this is a research opportunity enquiry and not an application to a postgraduate research degree at the University of Sydney. Please see the ‘How to apply section below’ for more information on submitting a formal application.

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Find a supervisor

For many of our academic programs, you will be working closely with a faculty supervisor who will guide you through your research project or thesis. It is often helpful to find a supervisor who has similar research interests to your own. Use the form below to search through our faculty. Note that this list is not comprehensive. If you cannot find a faculty member who is doing work in your field, contact the Graduate Chair of a similar program and they may be able to suggest a potential supervisor.

Before contacting a potential supervisor, we recommend that you review our Tips for Finding a Supervisor page. 

Supervisor search

What field do you want to do research in? We'll tell you who is doing work in that area and what programs may be a good match for you:

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Counselor Education and Supervision, Ph.D.

Advance in the growing mental health field as an effective counselor educator, clinical supervisor, researcher or clinician.

Through theoretical and didactic content, along with practical and experiential activities, you will be instructed intensively in counseling pedagogy, clinical supervision, advanced counseling theory and techniques, quantitative and qualitative research methodology and social justice and advocacy standards. You will be prepared to:

  • Teach in graduate counseling programs
  • Use advanced counseling skills with client populations
  • Supervise master’s-level counseling students and post-master’s counselors in need of licensure supervision
  • Conduct high-quality and meaningful research
  • Advocate for students, clients and the counseling profession

At A Glance

Program: ph.d. in counselor education and supervision, audience: graduate students, format: hybrid (face-to-face and online), next start date: fall 2025, cost: $990/credit, time to completion three years.

“As mental health continues to take priority for many, well-trained clinical mental health counselors are in demand. Doctoral students’ investment in learning to teach, provide clinical supervision and mentor the new generation of counselors is a privilege with the potential for exponential results.”

David Martinson, Ph.D. LPC Clinical Mental Health Counseling Professor and Chair of Immaculata’s Department of Psychology and Counseling

Career Outlook

Sample job titles and settings include:

  • Counselor educator or faculty member in a university
  • Clinical supervisor, clinician or supervisor in a hospital, outpatient mental health or substance abuse center, residential facility, health care facility or private practice
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the profession of substance abuse, behavioral disorder and mental health counseling is projected to grow 18% , much faster than average , over the next decade. Median salaries may range from $53,710 for mental health clinicians to $84,380 for academic faculty .

Program Highlights

  • Hybrid delivery for working professionals —Pursue this Ph.D. with a blend of evening and weekend courses offered through online synchronous and face-to-face formats.
  • Three-year program —Experiential and research-based components are integrated throughout the course sequencing, allowing you to complete the degree in as little as three years.
  • Collaborative cohort model —Small class sizes provide a personalized experience while building your professional network.
  • Affordability —Immaculata offers competitive tuition, with financial aid and graduate assistantship positions .  
  • Internships —Gain hands-on experience working in clinical, educational and supervisory settings via three 200-hour internships. Through our CACREP-accredited M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling , you can engage in supervision and teaching experiences on site at Immaculata University.
  • Research —Develop conceptual knowledge regarding a novel topic and acquire an in-depth understanding of the construct through research theory, methodology, strategies and application through the completion of the dissertation study.
  • Ryan Bowers, Ph.D.
  • David Hunt, Ph.D.
  • David Martinson, Ph.D.
  • Noah Schoch, Ph.D.
  • Shayna Finn, Ph.D.
  • Accreditation —The Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision is structured and built upon the five pillars of knowledge and application set forth by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), which are counseling, teaching, scholarship and research, supervision, and leadership/advocacy, in preparation for seeking accreditation. Immaculata University will apply for CACREP accreditation once students have been admitted into the program and the University has collected ample program evaluation data as required. The Ph.D. program will use the same structure and evaluation matrix as Immaculata’s already CACREP-accredited clinical mental health counseling program.

Course Overview

63 total credits

  • CESD 701: Professional Orientation and Ethics in Counselor Education and Supervision (3 credits)
  • CESD 702: Professional and Technical Writing for Counselor Education and Supervision (3 credits)
  • CESD 703: Advanced Clinical Counseling Theory (3 credits)
  • CESD 704: Counseling Supervision (3 credits)
  • CESD 705: Counselor Education Pedagogy (3 credits)
  • CESD 706: Qualitative Research I (3 credits)
  • CESD 707: Quantitative Research I (3 credits)
  • CESD 708: Quantitative Research II (3 credits)
  • CESD 709: Diverse Leadership in Counselor Education and Supervision (3 credits)
  • CESD 710: Clinical Counseling Internship* (min. 200 hours; 3 credits)
  • CESD 711: Counselor Education Internship* (min. 200 hours; 3 credits)
  • CESD 712: Counselor Supervision Internship* (min. 200 hours; 3 credits)
  • CESD 713: Advanced Assessment in Counselor Education and Supervision (3 credits)
  • CESD 714: Current Issues in Higher Education for Counselor Educators and Supervisors (3 credits)
  • CESD 715: Qualitative Research II (3 credits)
  • CESD 716: Counselor Education and Supervision Dissertation Seminar (3 credits)
  • CESD 720: Clinical Mental Health Counseling Seminar (3 credits)
  • CESD 721: School Counseling Seminar (3 credits)
  • CESD 722: Addiction Counseling Seminar (3 credits)
  • CESD 723: Student Affairs Counseling Seminar (3 credits)
  • CESD 724: Program Evaluation and Consultation (3 credits)
  • CESD 798: Counselor Education and Supervision Comprehensive Examination (0 credits)
  • CESD 700: Counselor Education and Supervision Continuing Dissertation (1 credit)

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the integration of evidence-based theories to the conceptualization, interventions and personalization of clients while attending to multicultural competencies and being conscious of clinical effectiveness.
  • Demonstrate legal and ethical evidence-based theoretical framework and models of counseling supervision through multimodal structures while attending to multicultural competencies and being conscious of clinical effectiveness.
  • Demonstrate understanding through application of roles and responsibilities of being an effective counselor educator by using evidence-based pedagogy and multicultural applications for classroom effectiveness.
  • Employ the consumption and creation of qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method research and data analysis through scholarship activities and creation of creative scholarship through action research.
  • Demonstrate understanding of leadership and advocacy models and the application to professional organizations, consultation and clients at the individual, system and policy levels.

Admission Requirements

Qualified applicants must possess a master’s degree in counseling or related discipline from a regionally accredited institution meeting master’s level academic requirements. While completion of a CACREP-accredited program is preferred, it is not required. Students with a master’s degree in counseling from a non-CACREP-accredited program may have to complete additional courses at the master’s level, as determined by the program director and department chair.

Applications are due January 15 for fall admission. View complete admission requirements .

Ryan Bowers, Ph.D., LPC, NCC, CAADC

Assistant professor, ph.d. program director, discover immaculata, grounded in ihm tradition and charism since 1920, find out what an iu education can do for your mind, your character and your future..

IMAGES

  1. How to Guides

    how to find a research supervisor

  2. How to Find Research Supervisors for Masters and PhD Degree

    how to find a research supervisor

  3. How to Select a Research Supervisor

    how to find a research supervisor

  4. How to Find a Research Supervisor

    how to find a research supervisor

  5. Journey to Graduate Research No 1: Tips for Finding a Research

    how to find a research supervisor

  6. HOW TO FIND A SUPERVISOR FOR RESEARCH || How to find a supervisor for

    how to find a research supervisor

VIDEO

  1. How to find research articles for free using Semantic Scholar 🧑‍🏫 #researchpaper #aitools #chatgpt

  2. Finding Research Guides

  3. Scholarship Mastery Academy: How to use Euraxess and ResearchGate Platforms to Find #Scholarships

  4. How to Email a Potential Research Supervisor/Professor (MSc./PhD Applicants-USA/Canada)

  5. EDUCATION STUDIES/UNIT-1/Philosophical systems /1(b) /PART-2/@jesueasy

  6. How to Find a Research Supervisor: Navigating Supervisor-Student Dynamics

COMMENTS

  1. Choosing a PhD Supervisor

    How you'll find your PhD supervisor depends on whether you're applying for an advertised project or putting forward your own research proposal.. If you're applying for an advertised project, the process of finding a supervisor is simple.Usually they'll be the academic who has devised the project in question, and the person you'll be making your application to.

  2. How to find a research supervisor

    Before you hit send. Make sure you use the supervisor's correct title and surname here, eg 'Dear Dr Lastname'. If you're not sure on the title, use Google to check - if there are no hits for 'Professor Lastname', try looking for 'Dr Lastname' and other variations instead. Check the spelling of the supervisor's name.

  3. How to Find a Good Research Supervisor: 5 Qualities to Look For

    3. Rapport and compatibility. 4. Leadership and mentoring. 5. Network and opportunities. 6. Here's what else to consider. Be the first to add your personal experience.

  4. How to Find the Right Research Supervisor for Your Research

    Remember, finding the right supervisor goes beyond their reputation or academic achievements. It is essential to assess their mentoring style, availability, and willingness to invest in your growth as a researcher. A supportive and collaborative supervisor can provide invaluable guidance, enhance your research skills, and open doors to new ...

  5. How to approach supervisors for research opportunities

    4. How to approach the first email. Think of the first email to the supervisor as a cover letter. The email should demonstrate why you are a suitable student for the chosen research, and why the supervisor should take you on as a research student. The following points should be considered prior to composing the email.

  6. How to find a PhD supervisor

    One key tip on how to find a PhD supervisor is to be transparent about your work and progress. Do not hide any inadvertent errors you may have made in your experiment or analyses. Always keep your supervisor "in the loop"! Honesty in every aspect of your work and working relationship will help build trust. Be realistic.

  7. How to find a research supervisor

    To find a potential supervisor: Find the school or research institute that is most relevant to your area of interest. If your proposed research is interdisciplinary, you may need to look at more than one school - List of our schools and departments. Browse through the staff profiles on the school or institute website.

  8. How to Find Your Ideal PhD Supervisor Using Google Scholar

    Step 3: Identify papers of interest. You'll find that the papers returned in this search will be on topics related to your subject of interest, or not. Identify the ones that appear to overlap with the research you would like to do. If you find yourself drawn to a particular sub-topic within the papers returned, you can also re-do your search ...

  9. Finding a supervisor

    Finding a supervisor. A supervisor is a professor who oversees your research and the development of your thesis. They provide mentorship, support, and guidance throughout your studies. Your relationship with your supervisor will be an important factor in your experience and success as a graduate student. Focus on finding a supervisor who shares ...

  10. Find a research supervisor

    Be inspired by the best researchers in your field. Deakin has more than 2000 research experts, many of them ranked among the top 1% globally. We provide a qualified team of at least two supervisors who will guide and support you through every stage of your research degree or PhD. No matter what your passion is, we're committed to broadening ...

  11. Finding a Research Supervisor

    Dr. Carissa Brown and Dr. Kristin Poduska provide tips for contacting and securing a graduate supervisor. For more information on how to become a graduate st...

  12. Find a supervisor

    Find a supervisor or research project. Graduate researchers at the University of Melbourne need at least two supervisors - one designated as the principal supervisor. Whether you want to join an established project with an assigned supervisory team or find supervisors for your own research project, the questions below may help you determine ...

  13. Find a Supervisor

    Find a Supervisor. If you're enrolled in a thesis-based graduate program, you will conduct your own research under the guidance of a supervisor. You are responsible for selecting your research topic and seeking out a potential supervisor. The supervisory relationship is a foundation of graduate education, particularly in the doctoral-stream ...

  14. Finding a supervisor

    Research supervisors are experienced researchers who have the skills to guide a student's project. A supervisor may be the leader of research group or laboratory; for example, in the Research School of Biology, research groups are listed on the website. The leader's last name is used is used to identify the research group.

  15. Finding a research supervisor

    Finding a research supervisor Graduate students in research-intensive programs (i.e., one that requires a thesis) will often need a faculty supervisor. We strongly encourage you check with your graduate program of interest to see if a supervisor is needed, and to find a supervisor at the time of application if necessary.

  16. Connecting with a Supervisor

    How to find and connect with potential supervisors Your relationship with your supervisor will be one of the most important factors contributing to the success of your graduate studies. Taking the time to find a supervisor who will complement your research and learning style will help to ensure the success of this relationship. Below are some important considerations to assist you in your efforts.

  17. How to Find a Research Supervisor

    1. Answer the Find Your Research Supervisor questionnaire. Based on your answers to three questions, the Find Your Research Supervisor questionnaire will suggest research projects in line with your objectives as well as faculty members with whom you could study. If you're looking for a topic for your master's thesis or doctoral project, our ...

  18. Find a supervisor

    Alternatively, you can find a supervisor using the Monash Find a Researcher tool. Please do not send a bulk email to a number of researchers. If a researcher agrees to supervise your research project, keep a copy of the email confirming this arrangement, as you will need it for your application. Information for Indigenous Australians.

  19. Research Supervisors

    The supervisor is the key person in a thesis-based graduate degree program. The principal role of the supervisor is to help students achieve their scholastic potential and to chair the student's Supervisory Committee. The Supervisor will provide reasonable commitment, accessibility, professionalism, stimulation, guidance, respect and ...

  20. Find a supervisor or research project

    Find a Supervisor or Project. General enquiries. As a UNSW higher degree research candidate, you will be guided by a supervisory team of world-class researchers who are leaders in their field. Use the filters below to search for potential supervisors or projects to start your research journey. Contact them to discuss your proposed research.

  21. Finding a PhD or MPhil supervisor

    Search the UWA Research Repository to identify potential supervisors in your field of interest. Use the UWA People Finder to locate the contact details of your identified potential academic supervisor. To seek supervision, please contact potential supervisors directly with your CV, a brief outline of research and academic transcripts. For a ...

  22. Research Supervisor Connect

    Complete academic transcripts for all of your degrees, including all final grades. An initial research proposal: In no more than 2000 words demonstrate how your research experience aligns with the supervisor's and why you're interested in this opportunity. You'll need to tailor your research proposal to each opportunity you enquire about.

  23. Advice for how to be a successful research professor (opinion)

    Be willing to review papers for journals and proposals for funding agencies. They are the best sources of information on advances in your research area. Be willing to read over and comment on colleagues' manuscripts and proposals. That is helpful to them, and you will learn more about current ideas in the field.

  24. Find a supervisor

    Find a supervisor. For many of our academic programs, you will be working closely with a faculty supervisor who will guide you through your research project or thesis. It is often helpful to find a supervisor who has similar research interests to your own. Use the form below to search through our faculty. Note that this list is not comprehensive.

  25. Counselor Education and Supervision, Ph.D.

    Advance in the growing mental health field as an effective counselor educator, clinical supervisor, researcher or clinician. Through theoretical and didactic content, along with practical and experiential activities, you will be instructed intensively in counseling pedagogy, clinical supervision, advanced counseling theory and techniques, quantitative and qualitative research methodology and ...

  26. Maybe it's the Trees: James Wo on Crime and the Environment

    His advisor asked whether he was ready to develop a new research question and take it all the way to a published article."It's about being a good student but also about being a good supervisor." Professor Wo says. He tries to give students hints rather than telling them what to do. "This comes from the heart," he says.