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US government and civics

Course: us government and civics   >   unit 5.

  • Ideologies of political parties in the United States

Ideologies of political parties: lesson overview

  • Ideologies of political parties

compare and contrast political parties essay

Dominant US ideologies and political parties

Other ideologies and parties, review questions, want to join the conversation.

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  • As Partisan Hostility Grows, Signs of Frustration With the Two-Party System

3. The two-party system and views of differences between the Republican and Democratic parties

Table of contents.

  • Leaners’ ratings of the opposing party are quite negative, but ratings of their ‘own’ party are lukewarm
  • A rise in the share of Americans with unfavorable views of both parties
  • The partisan gap in presidential approval ratings has grown over time
  • About half of Republicans like leaders who contend Trump won 2020 election
  • Views of political leaders’ approach to the other party
  • Does support for a political party reflect on a person’s character?
  • Majority of public sees a great deal of difference between Republican and Democratic parties
  • Most Americans say at least one candidate for office shares their views
  • Why partisan leaners lean – and why they don’t identify with a party
  • Non-college adults are more likely than college graduates to cite the party ‘sticking up for people like them’ as a major reason for identifying with it
  • Few voters say it is likely they will vote for the other party
  • Leaners hold fewer negative stereotypes about the other party than partisans, but rising shares attribute negative traits
  • Most Democrats view those in their party as more open-minded than other Americans; most GOP see co-partisans as more hardworking
  • Across the political spectrum, a rise in the number of negative traits attributed to opposing partisans
  • Acknowledgments
  • Methodology

Chart shows nearly four-in-ten Americans express a desire for more political parties

The two-party system is well-entrenched in American politics. It has been more than half a century since a candidate who was not from the Republican or Democratic Party has won a single state in a presidential election.

Despite, or perhaps because of, the poor recent track record of alternative parties, a sizable minority of Americans are supportive of the idea of having a greater choice of parties.

Nearly four-in-ten (39%) say the statement “I wish there were more political parties to choose from in this country” describes their views extremely (21%) or very well (17%). About a third (32%) say it describes their views somewhat well, while 28% say it describes their views not too well (16%) or not at all well (12%).

As might be expected, support for a wider range of parties is greatest among those who do not have strong allegiances to the Republican or Democratic Party.

About half of independents and others not aligned with a party (48%) say wishing they had more parties to choose from describes their views extremely (29%) or very well (19%). Similar shares of Republican-leaning independents (48%) and Democratic-leaning independents (53%) say this is something they would like to see in the U.S.

Among partisans, support for more choice in parties is higher among Democrats than Republicans.

Chart shows younger adults, college graduates are more likely to want more choices of political parties

About four-in-ten Democrats (38%) say wishing for more political parties to choose from describes their views extremely or very well, while 21% of Republicans say the same (8% extremely and 13% very). Almost half of Republicans say they do not wish for more political parties in the country (46% say this describes their views not too or not at all well); about a quarter of Democrats (26%) say this.

The desire for more political parties to choose from in the U.S. also varies across age groups and by educational attainment.

Younger adults are more likely than older adults to say they wish there were more political parties to choose form in this country. About half of adults ages 18 to 49 (47%) say this sentiment describes their views extremely or very well, compared with 35% of those ages 50 to 64 and about a quarter of adults who are 65 and older (23%).

Americans who have a high school education or less are the least likely to say they would like to have more choices of political parties: Just 34% say wanting more choices describes their views extremely or very well. About four-in-ten of those with some college education (40%) or with a college degree or more (43%) say they would like more parties to choose from.

Chart shows Republicans regardless of age express less support for more choices of political parties

Across partisan groups, younger American adults under age 40 are among the most likely to say they wish there were more political parties to choose from in the U.S., while Americans 65 and older are the least likely to express this opinion.

Overall, about half of adults under age 40 (48%) say they wish there were more political parties to choose from, but that share falls to about three-in-ten among those under age 40 who identify as Republicans (29%). About half or more of these younger adults who are Democrats (49%), lean toward the Democratic Party (54%) or lean toward the GOP (58%) say they wish there were more parties to choose from.

Adults ages 65 and older are generally less likely to express a desire for more parties. Among this age group, more than twice as many Democrats than Republicans indicate support for more parties (23% vs. 10%). Roughly a third of partisan leaners ages 65 and older express this sentiment.

Chart shows wide age differences in perceptions of how much parties differ from each other

Most Americans (57%) say there is a great deal of difference in what the Republican and Democratic parties stand for, while about a third (31%) say there is a fair amount of difference and 11% say there is hardly any difference at all. These views have changed little since 2019.

Views of differences between the parties vary across racial, ethnic, age and educational lines. The most likely groups to say there is a great deal of difference between the two major parties are White adults, older people and those with postgraduate degrees.

About six-in-ten White adults (61%) say there is a great deal of difference in what the parties stand for, which is somewhat higher than the shares of Black (56%), Asian American (51%) and Hispanic adults (46%) who say that. The shares who say there is hardly any difference between the parties is low across racial and ethnic lines, but Black (19%) and Hispanic (17%) adults are about twice as likely as Asian (9%) and White adults 8% to hold this view.

About three-quarters of adults ages 65 and older (73%) say there is a great deal of difference between Republicans and Democrats, while 63% of those ages 50 to 64 also say this. Only about half of adults ages 18 to 50 (48%) share this position.

There are modest educational differences in these views. Adults with postgraduate degrees (65%) are somewhat more likely than those with less educational attainment to say there is a great deal of difference between what the Republican and Democratic parties stand for.

Chart shows those with weaker partisan ties are less likely to see major differences between the two major parties

Strong partisans are the most likely to view a great deal of difference between what the Democratic and Republican parties stand for. About three-quarters of strong Republicans (76%) and strong Democrats (78%) say there is a great deal of difference between the parties.

The share who express that view falls to 61% among less strong Democrats and 51% among less strong Republicans. About half of independents who lean toward the Democratic Party (49%) say there is a great deal of difference, while about four-in-ten Republican-leaning independents (43%) say this.

Democratic leaners (18%) and Republican leaners (13%) are the most likely groups to say there is hardly any difference between the parties; few share this view within any of the partisan groups.

Chart shows younger people more likely than older adults to say they usually feel like no candidate shares their views

Most Americans say that they usually feel like there is at least one candidate who shares most of their views (55%), while about four-in-ten (43%) say they feel like none of the candidates represents their views well.

Partisans and older adults are the most likely to say they feel like there are candidates who share their views, while partisan leaners and younger adults say there are not candidates who represent their views well.

Seven-in-ten or more Republicans (74%) and Democrats (69%) say there is usually at least one candidate who shares most of their views, compared with fewer than half of Republican (42%) and Democratic leaners (38%).

Among adults ages 18 to 49, 53% say there are usually no candidates that represent their views well, while just 27% of adults ages 65 and older say the same. Most adults 50 and older say they usually have candidates to vote for who share most of their views: 62% of those ages 50 to 64 say this, as do 71% of those 65 and older.

Chart shows partisan leaners increasingly feel no candidates represent their views well

Since 2018, the shares of independents who lean toward a party that say they feel that none of the candidates represents their views well has increased. Among Democratic leaners, the share saying this increased from 50% in 2018 to 61% today, while the share of Republican leaners with the same opinion increased from 39% to 57%. Views among Republicans and Democrats are little changed over that same period.

The feeling that candidates for political office do not represent their views well also has increased across age groups over the past four years. The share who say that none of the candidates represents their views has increased from 47% in 2018 to 54% now among those ages 18 to 29, and from 43% to 52% among those ages 30 to 49. There have been similar increases among older Americans (36% today vs. 29% in 2018 for those ages 50 to 64, and 27% now vs. 22% then for those 65 and older).

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Humanities LibreTexts

4.1: Introduction to Comparison and Contrast Essay

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The key to a good compare-and-contrast essay is to choose two or more subjects that connect in a meaningful way. Comparison and contrast is simply telling how two things are alike or different. The compare-and-contrast essay starts with a thesis that clearly states the two subjects that are to be compared, contrasted, or both. The thesis should focus on comparing, contrasting, or both.

Key Elements of the Compare and Contrast:

  • A compare-and-contrast essay analyzes two subjects by either comparing them, contrasting them, or both.
  • The purpose of writing a comparison or contrast essay is not to state the obvious but rather to illuminate subtle differences or unexpected similarities between two subjects.
  • The thesis should clearly state the subjects that are to be compared, contrasted, or both, and it should state what is to be learned from doing so.
  • Organize by the subjects themselves, one then the other.
  • Organize by individual points, in which you discuss each subject in relation to each point.
  • Use phrases of comparison or phrases of contrast to signal to readers how exactly the two subjects are being analyzed.

Objectives: By the end of this unit, you will be able to

  • Identify compare & contrast relationships in model essays
  • Construct clearly formulated thesis statements that show compare & contrast relationships
  • Use pre-writing techniques to brainstorm and organize ideas showing a comparison and/or contrast
  • Construct an outline for a five-paragraph compare & contrast essay
  • Write a five-paragraph compare & contrast essay
  • Use a variety of vocabulary and language structures that express compare & contrast essay relationships

Example Thesis: Organic vegetables may cost more than those that are conventionally grown, but when put to the test, they are definitely worth every extra penny.

Graphic Showing Organization for Comparison Contrast Essay

Sample Paragraph:

Organic grown tomatoes purchased at the farmers’ market are very different from tomatoes that are grown conventionally. To begin with, although tomatoes from both sources will mostly be red, the tomatoes at the farmers’ market are a brighter red than those at a grocery store. That doesn’t mean they are shinier—in fact, grocery store tomatoes are often shinier since they have been waxed. You are likely to see great size variation in tomatoes at the farmers’ market, with tomatoes ranging from only a couple of inches across to eight inches across. By contrast, the tomatoes in a grocery store will be fairly uniform in size. All the visual differences are interesting, but the most important difference is the taste. The farmers’ market tomatoes will be bursting with flavor from ripening on the vine in their own time. However, the grocery store tomatoes are often close to being flavorless. In conclusion, the differences in organic and conventionally grown tomatoes are obvious in color, size and taste.

Creative Commons Attribution

The Election of 1800: a Pivotal Moment in American Democracy

This essay about the Election of 1800 explores its significance in American history, highlighting the first peaceful transfer of power between opposing political parties. It discusses the ideological differences between Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republicans and John Adams’ Federalists, the intense electoral process, and the resulting constitutional change with the 12th Amendment. The essay underscores the election’s lasting impact on the political landscape and its role in shaping the modern two-party system.

How it works

The Election of 1800 holds a significant place in American history, marking a pivotal moment in the development of the nation’s democracy. This election was not just a routine transition of power; it was the first peaceful transfer of authority between opposing political parties in the young United States, setting a precedent for democratic stability and governance that continues to this day.

The main contenders in the election were Thomas Jefferson, representing the Democratic-Republican Party, and John Adams, the incumbent president from the Federalist Party.

The contest was intense and underscored deep ideological differences. The Federalists, led by Adams and Alexander Hamilton, supported a strong central government, economic growth through commerce, and close relations with Britain. In contrast, Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans advocated for states’ rights, agrarian interests, and a pro-French foreign policy.

The electoral process in 1800 was quite different from today. At that time, state legislatures, rather than the general populace, chose electors who cast two votes each without distinguishing between presidential and vice-presidential candidates. The candidate with the most votes became president, and the runner-up became vice president.

The election results were extremely close. Jefferson and his running mate, Aaron Burr, each received 73 electoral votes, while Adams received 65. The tie between Jefferson and Burr forced the decision into the House of Representatives, as required by the Constitution. This revealed a flaw in the electoral system and set the stage for intense political negotiations.

The Federalist-dominated House faced a difficult task in resolving the tie. For 35 ballots, the deadlock persisted, with Federalists split between supporting Jefferson or Burr. Despite his rivalry with Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton played a crucial role. Viewing Burr as the greater danger, Hamilton threw his support behind Jefferson, whom he saw as the lesser evil. His influence persuaded enough Federalists to break the deadlock, and on the 36th ballot, Jefferson was elected the third president of the United States.

The 1800 election’s significance extended beyond its immediate political outcome. It emphasized the importance of a peaceful transfer of power, a principle that has become a cornerstone of the American political system. The smooth transition from Federalist to Democratic-Republican control demonstrated the strength of the Constitution and the resilience of the young republic.

Furthermore, the election led to a significant constitutional change. The 12th Amendment, ratified in 1804, introduced separate electoral votes for president and vice president, preventing future ties and ensuring a more efficient electoral process.

The ideological battle between the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans during the 1800 election also had a lasting impact on the United States’ political landscape. The Federalist vision of a strong central government and industrial economy gradually gave way to the Democratic-Republican emphasis on agrarianism and states’ rights. Jefferson’s victory represented a shift towards a more inclusive and participatory government, reflecting the growing influence of ordinary citizens in American politics.

Looking back, the 1800 election was a defining moment that tested the durability of the American experiment in self-governance. It revealed deep divisions within the country but also showcased the mechanisms through which such conflicts could be peacefully resolved. The election set a precedent for the peaceful transfer of power, a practice that has endured as a hallmark of American democracy.

The election also had broader implications for the development of political parties in the United States. The Federalist Party, weakened by internal divisions and its inability to retain the presidency, gradually lost its influence. In contrast, the Democratic-Republican Party grew stronger, shaping American politics for decades. This realignment laid the foundation for the modern two-party system, which remains a central feature of the American political landscape.

In summary, the election of 1800 was a watershed moment in American history, encapsulating the nation’s early tensions and triumphs. It demonstrated the resilience of democratic principles amid partisan strife and established a lasting precedent for the peaceful transfer of power. The legacy of this election continues to resonate, highlighting the enduring importance of democratic governance and the ongoing quest for a more perfect union.

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The Election of 1800: A Pivotal Moment in American Democracy. (2024, Jun 01). Retrieved from https://papersowl.com/examples/the-election-of-1800-a-pivotal-moment-in-american-democracy/

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PapersOwl.com. (2024). The Election of 1800: A Pivotal Moment in American Democracy . [Online]. Available at: https://papersowl.com/examples/the-election-of-1800-a-pivotal-moment-in-american-democracy/ [Accessed: 3 Jun. 2024]

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The Morning

Patriotism, diversity and the election.

We explore the battle for Senate control.

An image of a man walking among several American flags.

By David Leonhardt

Climate change. Student debt. Diversity, equity and inclusion. The war in Gaza.

These topics are central to progressive politics today. They are the subject of campus protests and online debates. They are also almost completely absent from the campaigns of Democratic Senate candidates trying to win tough races this year.

In yesterday’s newsletter , I noted that Democratic candidates are leading the polls in six states where President Biden is trailing — and that all six have based their campaigns around populist themes of defending ordinary citizens against the powerful. Today, I’ll look at some other campaign themes.

One is the contrast between the country’s most heated political debates and the top concerns of most voters. Those heated debates are shaped by policy experts, campaign donors and political activists, all of whom tend to be highly educated and relatively affluent. The full electorate often has different priorities.

Student debt and housing costs make for a useful comparison. Student debt, a subject that the Biden administration has emphasized, may seem like the ultimate pocketbook issue. In reality, it’s more niche: Only 18 percent of U.S. adults have any federal student debt.

That helps explain why, in a recent Harvard University survey of U.S. residents between 18 and 29 years old, student debt ranked dead last when the pollsters asked respondents which of 16 issues mattered to them. Israel and Palestine ranked 15th of 16. Climate change was 12th — and, again, this was a poll of voters under 30 . The top three issues were inflation, health care and housing.

No wonder that student debt is largely missing from these Democratic campaigns, while housing — a cost almost every family faces — is a focus. Senator Jacky Rosen, who’s running for re-election in Nevada, has devoted an entire ad to housing costs. Senator Jon Tester’s campaign lists the “housing crisis” as one of Montana’s biggest problems.

A clarifying point about American politics is that people who follow it closely are very different from swing voters. With that in mind, I offer four other themes from the Senate campaigns:

1. Bipartisanship

As polarized as the country is, many voters still hunger for bipartisanship. In their ads, the six Democrats generally treat Republicans with respect and celebrate collaboration.

Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio boasts about working with Republicans to pass a semiconductor law. Senator Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin shows videos of Donald Trump and Biden in one ad, and a narrator explains that she worked with both to crack down on Chinese imports. Rosen brags of being “named one of the most bipartisan senators.”

The issue on which the Democrats try hardest to distance themselves from their own party is immigration, which polls show is a major Biden weakness . Rosen tells voters that she “ stood up to my own party to support police officers and get more funding for border security.” A Tester ad says that he “fought to stop President Biden from letting migrants stay in America instead of remain in Mexico.”

2. Abortion

Abortion is the opposite. It’s the issue on which the Republican Party is out of step with public opinion — and Democrats are on the offensive.

Rosen describes her likely Nevada opponent, Sam Brown, as “another MAGA extremist trying to take away abortion rights.” Tester, when listing the ways he fights for Montanans, says, “We’ve got folks who want to take away women’s right to choose.”

That said, abortion remains a secondary issue in most of these campaigns.

3. Patriotism

“Growing up poor, the only thing I really had was the American dream,” Ruben Gallego, an Arizona congressman running for Senate, says in the opening line of an ad . “It’s the one thing that we give every American no matter where they are born in life.”

That sentiment is typical of the six campaigns’ unabashed patriotism. Gallego highlights his Marine service in Iraq. Veterans’ health care is a theme of a few campaigns. An ad for Senator Bob Casey of Pennsylvania that is focused on steel includes the line “Take that, China.”

4. Diversity, subtly

The candidates’ ads portray a diverse America. When Rosen talks about housing, she shows a racially mixed group of young couples. A Brown campaign ad about the Ohio steel industry stars both Black and white workers. In a Baldwin ad , a Wisconsin businesswoman with a European accent praises the senator for fighting against federal rules about cheese making. Gallego talks about his mother’s struggles as an immigrant.

But the campaigns treat diversity as a natural part of American life, rather than as a political project. They emphasize the commonalities of Americans with different backgrounds. It’s a different approach from an identity politics that centers race.

Gallego has even achieved some notoriety for mocking the term Latinx. It disrespects the Spanish language, he has said, and is “largely used to satisfy white liberals.” He barred his congressional office from using the term.

It reminds me of a point that Steve Bannon, the far-right political strategist, has made: When American politics focus on race, Republicans — like Bannon and Trump — tend to benefit.

The flip side is that when campaigns focus on economic class, Democrats have the chance to benefit. You can see that lesson in these six populist campaigns.

Related: Watch campaign ads from these candidates .

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For months, Biden has trailed in national and battleground polls, but the race is still pretty close , Nate Cohn writes.

Biden framed Trump as a racist at a rally in Philadelphia. “What do you think would have happened if Black Americans had stormed the Capitol? I don’t think he’d be talking about pardons.”

Richard Grenell tried to overturn Nevada’s 2020 presidential election results. He hopes to become Trump’s secretary of state .

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Israel said it had taken control of a slice of Gaza along the border with Egypt. An Israeli spokesman said Hamas used the zone to smuggle weapons.

Israel’s national security adviser said he expected the war in Gaza to continue at least until the end of the year .

Hamas has physically abused hostages, prevented them from speaking and denied them food and water, according to a former captive whose husband is still being held.

The Israeli offensive in Rafah has forced all but one hospital to close , aid groups said. Transporting patients has been difficult and dangerous.

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Hong Kong convicted 14 democracy activists of conspiracy to commit subversion in the city’s largest national security trial.

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The U.S. can avoid war by building up its military , Senator Roger Wicker , a Republican, argues.

The Justice Department should petition the other Supreme Court justices to require Alito and Clarence Thomas to recuse themselves from Jan. 6 cases , Representative Jamie Raskin , a Democrat, writes.

Pro-Palestinian protesters have graduated , and their employers may not indulge their particular vision, Pamela Paul writes.

Here are columns by Charles Blow on pro-Trump rappers and Nicholas Kristof on political differences between men and women .

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Fleet Week: Once a year, members of the Navy, the Marines and the Coast Guard cruise into New York. It feels like a movie .

Myth: Remember that old map of taste buds on your tongue? It’s wrong .

Sleepless: At night, a modified Dodge Charger is noisily roaming downtown Seattle. No one seems to be able to stop it .

Social Q’s: “Why can’t I break into my new boyfriend’s friendship group ?”

Buy a dino: The largest Stegosaurus fossil ever found will be auctioned at Sotheby’s .

Lives Lived: Despite having no formal training in painting or marine biology, Richard Ellis fused his artistic flair with his knowledge of ocean creatures to create works like the life-size blue whale at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He died at 86 .

N.H.L.: The Edmonton Oilers defeated the Dallas Stars to even their series , 2-2.

Women’s hockey: Minnesota became the first winner of the Walter Cup after beating Boston 3-0. This is the inaugural season of the professional women’s hockey league.

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  4. Advantages and Disadvantages of Party Systems

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  6. Week 2: Compare OR Contrast Essay

COMMENTS

  1. Ideologies of political parties: lesson overview

    The fourth-largest party in the United States. Founded in 2001, the Green Party favors a strong federal government. Its candidates often run on a platform of grassroots democracy, nonviolence, social justice, and environmentalism. Libertarian Party, libertarian ideology. The third-largest party in the United States.

  2. The two-party system and views of differences between the Republican

    The two-party system is well-entrenched in American politics. It has been more than half a century since a candidate who was not from the Republican or Democratic Party has won a single state in a presidential election.. Despite, or perhaps because of, the poor recent track record of alternative parties, a sizable minority of Americans are supportive of the idea of having a greater choice of ...

  3. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    929 Words. 4 Pages. Open Document. Political parties are composed of several different parties for example; Democratic Party, Republican Party, Libertarian Party, and Green Party. The two major parties are Democratic and Republican Majority of Americans classify as these two. Political parties are essential institutions of democracy.

  4. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast The Political Parties In The Jacksonian Era 205 Words | 1 Pages. There were great political parties in the Jacksonian era. The Age of Jackson, led by Andrew Jackson, president from 1829 to 1837 had a distinct sway on American politics.

  5. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast Political Parties. It's that time again, in occurrence every three years when candidates from different political parties begin preparing campaigns for next presidency. Modern politics consist of two major parties, the Republican and Democratic Party. Candidates from these two parties usually present and debate on hard ...

  6. Comparing and Contrasting Political Ideologies & Movements: Essay

    Comparing and Contrasting Political Ideologies & Movements: Essay Prompts. Instructor Kristine Roda Alingod. Cite this lesson. Liberalism, socialism, republicanism, and fascism are examples of ...

  7. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Democrats vs. Republicans Democrats and republicans are part of the party systems referred to as political parties. Political parties are a group of people with the same ideas and connections about the government. They want to get their viewpoints across, and therefore form groups/parties in order to be heard by the government.

  8. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    The Democratic and Republican parties are the two major parties in the United States, and they have many intricate ways of how they came to be what they are today. In 1492, political government first began when Christopher Columbus discovered the America's. The Europeans were the first to have control of the land and ran it on their beliefs.

  9. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast Political Parties. Political Parties in the U.S. represent a crucial foundation of a strong democracy. The United States political parties have a different stories, which eventually leads to a unlike platforms due to their interests. As it is well known, the nation has two major Parties, the Republican and Democrat Party.

  10. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast Political Parties. 782 Words4 Pages. American politics consists of two major political parties. Each party has its own agenda, platforms and goals to make America a better place. These two political parties have been divided by; Democratic Party and the Republican Party or Independents (who are voters that do not identify ...

  11. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Political Polarization Essay 1443 Words | 6 Pages. 7/9/2023 The Evolution of the Political Party and Political Polarization [1] After the events of the American Revolution, in his Farewell Address, President George Washington warned against the nature of political parties; however, as political affairs became increasingly complex, the government required a different system.

  12. Comparing and Contrasting the Two Major American Political Parties

    In terms of demographics and geography, the Democrats and Republicans are quite contrasting. By and large, the Republican Party is most powerful in the South and Midwest, while the Democratic Party gains its power mostly from the North and the West coast. Republicans are more likely to be older, more wealthy, more religious and white (though ...

  13. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    The main reason for the rise of political parties during the 1790s was because each of the parties favored different political and economical reforms needed as a new, developing country. Alexander Hamilton led the Federalists and they favored a loose interpretation of the Constitution, while Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republican Party ...

  14. Assignment 1: Compare & Contrast Synthesis Essay

    Political Science 103 - Assignment 1: Compare & Contrast Synthesis Essay. If you have a Study.com College Saver membership and are seeking college credit for this course, you must submit an ...

  15. Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

    Making effective comparisons. As the name suggests, comparing and contrasting is about identifying both similarities and differences. You might focus on contrasting quite different subjects or comparing subjects with a lot in common—but there must be some grounds for comparison in the first place. For example, you might contrast French ...

  16. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast Political Parties. Decent Essays. 450 Words. 2 Pages. Open Document. Political Parties are a major pillar of the American political system. However, they were not always well received. During America's fight to ratify the Constitution in 1787, James Madison wrote Federalist No. 10 that condemned "factions".

  17. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast Political Parties. 1. The Republican party and the Democratic party are different political ideologies. While the Democratic party is more liberal with people's issues and the Republican party is more conservative giving God and work top priority. The Republicans believe in government that take care of law enforcement and ...

  18. A Compare And Contrast Essay On Political Party

    A Compare And Contrast Essay On Political Party. 712 Words3 Pages. A political party is an alliance of like-minded individuals who work together in an effort to win elections and control the government in their favor. They compete against each other for political power and the ability to put their ideologies into affect.

  19. Compare And Contrast Political Parties

    Political parties in America have been prevalent since the Federalist Party was founded by Alexander Hamilton, and the Democratic-Republican party was founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, in the 1790s ("Compare U.S. Political Parties"). These parties were developed from sharp differences in opinion.

  20. 4.1: Introduction to Comparison and Contrast Essay

    4.1: Introduction to Comparison and Contrast Essay. The key to a good compare-and-contrast essay is to choose two or more subjects that connect in a meaningful way. Comparison and contrast is simply telling how two things are alike or different. The compare-and-contrast essay starts with a thesis that clearly states the two subjects that are to ...

  21. Compare And Contrast The Political Parties

    Compare And Contrast The Political Parties. Over time American political parties have changed. One of the first parties is the Federalist and Democratic-Republicans. The Federalist was a group with three of the nation's most gifted political thinkers - James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. These people believed in being allies with ...

  22. The Election of 1800: a Pivotal Moment in American Democracy

    The election also had broader implications for the development of political parties in the United States. The Federalist Party, weakened by internal divisions and its inability to retain the presidency, gradually lost its influence. In contrast, the Democratic-Republican Party grew stronger, shaping American politics for decades.

  23. Patriotism, Diversity and the Election

    One is the contrast between the country's most heated political debates and the top concerns of most voters. Those heated debates are shaped by policy experts, campaign donors and political ...