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residential green building case study in india

Indira Paryavaran Bhawan Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF)

Energy Efficient Design Features

Location New Delhi
Geographical coordinates 28° N, 77° E
Occupancy Type Office (MoEF)
Typology New Construction
Climate Type Composite
Project Area 9,565 m
Grid Connectivity Grid connected
EPI 44 kWh/m /yr

Introduction

Indira Paryavaran Bhawan, the new office building for Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) sets is a radical change from a conventional building design.

The project team put special emphasis on strategies for reducing  energy demand by providing adequate natural light, shading,  landscape to reduce ambient temperature, and energy efficient active building systems. Several energy conservation measures were adopted to reduce the energy loads of the building and the remaining demand was met by producing energy from on-site installed high efficiency solar panels to achieve net zero criteria. Indira Paryavaran Bhawan uses 70% less energy compared a conventional building. The project adopted green building concepts including conservation and optimization of water by recyclingwaste water from the site.

Indira Paryavaran Bhawan is now India’s highest green rated building. The project has received GRIHA 5 Star and LEED Platinum. The building has already won awards such as the Adarsh/GRIHA of MNRE for exemplary demonstration of Integration of Renewable Energy Technologies.

residential green building case study in india

Passive Design Strategies

  • Orientation:  Building is north south oriented, with separate blocks connected through corridors and a huge central court yard. Orientation minimizes heat ingress. Optimal window to wall ratio.
  • Landscaping:  More than 50% area outside the building is covered with plantation.Circulation roads and pathways are  soft paved to enable ground water recharge.
  • Daylighting:  75% of building floor space is day lit, thus reducing dependence on artificial sources for lighting. Inner courtyard serves as a light well.
  • Ventilation:  Central courtyard helps in air movement as natural ventilation happens due to stack effect. Windows and jaalis add to cross ventilation.
  • Optimized Building Envelope – Window assembly (U-Value 0.049 W/m 2 K),VLT 0.59, SHGC 0.32
  • uPVC windows with hermetically sealed double glazed using low heat transmittance index glass
  • Rock wool insulation
  • High efficiency glass
  • Cool roofs: Use of high reflectance terrace tiles for heat ingress, high strength, hard wearing.
  • AAC blocks with fly ash
  • Fly ash based plaster & mortar
  • Stone and Ferro cement jaalis
  • Local stone flooring
  • Bamboo jute composite doors, frames and flooring
  • High efficiency glass, high VLT, low SHGC & Low U-value, optimized by appropriate shading
  • Light shelves for diffused sunlight

residential green building case study in india

Active Strategies

Lighting Design

  • Energy efficient lighting system ( LPD = 5 W/m 2 ) , nearly 50% more efficient than Energy Conservation Building Code 2007 requirements ( LPD = 11 W/m 2 )  reduces energy demand further.
  • Remaining lighting load supplied by building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV).
  • Use of energy efficient lighting fixtures (T5 lamps).
  • Use of lux level sensor to optimize operation of artificial lighting.

Optimized Energy Systems / HVAC system

Chilled beam system/ VFD/ Screw Chillers

  • 160 TR of air conditioning load of the building is met through Chilled beam system. Chilled beam are used from second to sixth floor. This reduces energy use by 50 % compared to a conventional system.
  • HVAC load of the buildings is 40 m 2 /TR, about 50% more efficient than ECBC requirements (20 m 2 /TR)
  • Chilled water is supplied at 16° C and return temperature is 20° C.
  • Drain pans are provided with the chilled beams to drain out water droplets due to condensation during monsoon.
  • Water cooled chillers, double skin air handling units with variable frequency drivers(VFD)
  • Chilled beams save AHU/FCU fan power consumption by approximate 50 kW.
  • VFDs provided in chilled water pumping system, cooling tower fans and AHUs.
  • Fresh supply air is pre cooled from toilet exhaust air through sensible & latent heat energy recovery wheel.
  • Control of HVAC equipment & monitoring of all systems through integrated building management system.
  • Functional zoning to reduce air conditioning loads.
  • Room temperature is maintained at 26 ±1 ° C

Geothermal heat exchange system

  • There are 180 vertical bores to the depth of 80 meter all along the building premises. Minimum 3 meter distance is maintained between any two bores.
  • Each bore has HDPE pipe U-loop (32mm outer diameter) and grouted with Bentonite Slurry. Each U-Loop is connected to the condenser water pipe system in the central air conditioning plant room.
  • One U-Loop has 0.9 TR heat rejection capacity. Combined together, 160 TR of heat rejection is obtained without using a cooling tower.

residential green building case study in india

Renewable Energy

  • Solar PV System of 930 kW capacity
  • Total Area: 6,000 m 2
  • Total Area of panels: 4,650 m 2
  • No of panels: 2,844
  • Annual Energy Generation: 14.3 lakh unit

ACTUAL GENERATION ON SITE ( as on 25.01.2014)

  • Power supply to grid started on 19.11.2013
  • Power generation achieved: 300 kWh per day
  • Total generation: 2.0 kWh
  • Sustainable Architectural Built Environment

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Home » Property Trends » How green buildings support India’s ESG goals and targets?

How green buildings support India’s ESG goals and targets?

residential green building case study in india

Like other countries, India has undergone a paradigm shift when it comes to sustainability, with Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) objectives forming the centrepiece of the ecosystem. While ESG was looked at mostly through the lens of regulation, it has now become the crux of overarching strategies not just in the business landscape but also from the perspective of India’s economic and developmental growth.

Table of Contents

India’s market regulator, Securities and Exchange Board of India had launched the Business Responsibility Report (BRR) for top 100 listed companies in 2012 and extended it to the top 500 listed companies in 2015.

In 2021, the BRR was replaced by the Business Responsibility and Sustainability Report (BRSR) that mandated ESG disclosures to be communicated by the top 1,000 listed companies based on their market capitalization. After this, more businesses have become aware of their responsibilities whether it is about environmental protection or the health and well-being of employees.

Meanwhile, the ‘E’ in ESG symbolises environment, highlighting the need to reduce environmental impact. This is where green buildings step into picture. These structures are built keeping in mind ecologically friendly practices. Besides, such buildings also help in offsetting carbon emissions and support water and energy conservations.

As India embarks on a journey of sustainable development, it is the need of the hour to incorporate more green buildings not just to nurture the environment, but also to reflect the country’s commitment to ESG significance.

Impact of green buildings

Not many are aware that these buildings can have a lasting impact on people and the planet. According to the Energy Statistics India report, there are a few industries that consume more energy than others — iron and steel account for 15.29% of industrial energy usage, while chemicals and petrochemicals (5.36%), and construction (2.09%).

Constructing green buildings is one of the key steps that can have a multi-fold impact, ensuring environmental protection and economic growth. It can be achieved by ensuring that eco-friendly architectural approaches are adopted as part of various building phases, ranging from initial design to renovation, and reconstruction.

Statistics highlight that construction of buildings account for 40% of the world’s energy consumption. Fortunately, with green buildings, lower energy consumption is one of its prominent markers. As these buildings are designed with energy-efficiency, it not only helps with decreased consumption of energy but also lowers operational expenses.

In a nutshell, green buildings can work well on various counts — apart from offering environmental sustainability, these structures also help with efficient use of water resources.

Green buildings from an economic lens

There is often a misconception that green buildings will not reap profits but that’s far from true. For starters, they bring down the long-term costs considerably even if the construction of the building in its initial phases is capital-intensive. They yield substantial savings over their operational lifespan — this is perfectly aligned with and reinforces India’s commitment towards sustainable economic development.

Green buildings are also considered as a lucrative option for investors and tenants as they offer long-term gains. These are in sync with India’s strategic goal of promoting sustainable investments to support its economic growth trajectory.

Government support and policy landscape

India’s sustained commitment towards construction of ecologically friendly buildings is clearly visible through its policy framework for green building practices. There are a set of guidelines that have been mandated by the government for the construction and development sectors. These are holistic in approach, covering everything from environmental concerns to responsible governance.

One of the most prominent examples is the widespread adoption of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system that has been designed by the US Green Building Council. This certification has been embraced by developers and business organizations alike, much in line with India’s resolve to foster environmentally conscious construction and development.

Leading by example, some of the most prominent buildings in the country including the T3 at Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport has secured a LEED certification.

Going forward, it is a good idea to weave in green building standards into national policies. A case study here is the National Building Code of India that has been updated to include provisions for green building construction.

When India embarked on the Smart Cities Mission in 2015, striving to establish 100 smart cities across the country, the vision was clear to prioritize sustainable urbanization. Once again, a holistic approach was adopted — where technology, infrastructure, and governance were integrated in equal measure. In fact, all the green building principles apply here, from optimized energy consumption to efficient waste management.

Another much-talked-about initiative, the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (PMAY) that was launched in 2015 to provide affordable housing to all citizens encourages the construction of energy-efficient and sustainable housing. By incorporating green building principles, PMAY contributes not only to curbing energy usage but also promoting sustainable urban living.

Creating impact

The widespread adoption of green building practices and certifications, as well as the seamless integration of sustainable design principles into national policies aligns well with the environmental pillar of ESG. Through some effective measures around sustainable construction, India’s policy framework can rightfully navigate the damaging consequences of urban development.

Embassy REIT, a leading Indian real estate investment trust has incorporated an ESG approach to ensure that its sustainability efforts have a positive outcome. By taking these steps, it has turned around its case. Today, it has a LEED Platinum certification for all 77 operational buildings that covers 33.4 Mn square feet. This is spread across 12 office parks in Bangalore, Mumbai, Pune, and NCR.

Moreover, with sustainability being the centrepiece of its operations, Embassy REIT is on a mission to achieve 100% USGBC certification across its entire portfolio by FY2023.

Additionally, the company has launched a ’75/25 Renewable’ program, targeting at least 75% of electricity consumption from renewable sources by FY2025. In FY2023, 52% of its energy consumption came from renewables; it has also installed electric vehicle charging points while embracing electric vehicles for internal transportation within its properties.

Another example is that of DLF, a player in India’s real estate sector for over 75 years. Most of its developments incorporate green building standards, thereby focusing on energy-efficiency.

In its rental portfolio, approximately 39 Mn square feet is LEED Platinum certified. It has also secured the LEED Zero Water certification across its portfolio including retail malls from the US Green Building Council (USGBC). DLF The Crest is the largest residential project in the world to be awarded with Platinum Certification under LEED v4.1 O+M: Existing Buildings.

Another example is Mindspace REIT. As part of the ‘K Raheja Corp Group’, a pioneer in the Indian real estate’s green transition, Mindspace REIT has prioritized eco-friendly construction. By March 31, 2023, an impressive 97% of its operational area held green certifications (LEED Platinum or Gold). This is visible in 54 operational buildings that have LEED certifications.

These examples have a key takeaway — with the greater adoption of green building practices, India’s goal of an ESG-conscious ecosystem is not too far, if all stakeholders in the construction space make their individual contributions. As they say, every drop counts.

(T he author is managing director, Southeast Asia, and Middle East, GBCI, India.)

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Gopalakrishnan Padmanabhan

Gopalakrishnan Padmanabhan is the Regional Director of GBCI India, and manages the business and market development of LEED and other GBCI rating systems for the Southeast Asia and Middle East regions. An alumnus of College of Engineering, Guindy and IIM Kolkata, he holds expertise in corporate strategy, international market expansion, branding, and business unit creation. He has over 20 years of corporate work experience in Southeast Asia and the Middle East.

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10 of India’s most sustainable buildings

residential green building case study in india

Sustainability, as we know, is using the resources mindfully, such that we’re able to preserve them for the coming generations. This practice has been adopted by Architects, Planners, and Developers as up till now humans have reached a level that they tend to exploit the natural resources. 

The need for green buildings: 

The advantage of adopting such practices are minimizing the harmful impacts that building usage and construction impact on the environment. As we move ahead, using less energy, water, and other natural resources creates a healthy environment. This involves using vernacular materials, providing adequate light and ventilation while consciously constructing methods, the conceptualization of design, and ratifying eco-friendly materials. 

In India, Architects are working towards it and therefore, there are some great examples of how architecture and sustainability shouldn’t be two different terms but should be put to use in a singleton manner. Statistics show that if each building would be sustainable, we could end up saving 8400 megawatt that is enough for 550,000 houses in one year. 

Some organizations that work towards this practice are LEED, IGBC, BEE-ECBC, TERI, and GRIHA. They give certifications based on the actions taken and adapted by the organization. 

10 most appreciated buildings are: 

1. One Horizon Center, Gurgaon

Designed by Robert AM Stein, the building has been given a LEED Gold Certification. The building materials used are LEED approved Glass along with RCC construction style. The landscape adds to its features of maintaining a low temperature. The large atrium experience creates an impression of grandeur. It is a 25 story building with various offices. The ample amount of light during the day prevents from using mechanical light appliances. They avoid using electrical appliances on Sundays and non-working days.

residential green building case study in india

2. Infinity Benchmark, Kolkata 

It is a Platinum rated Green Building as certified by USGBC. (U.S. Green Building Council). The building is the second one after the U.S to have such flexibility and cost-efficiency. There is a wide range of amenities that range from wet laboratories to Software development offices. The highlighting features are CO2 monitoring sensors which help in maintaining the indoor air quality, Zero-Discharge water facility, recyclable construction management are a few features. 

residential green building case study in india

3. Suzlon One Earth, Pune

It is a world-leading company, in wind energy resources, which pledged to create a better work environment. It has been an epitome of green offices in India. The energy efficiency achieved is 92% and there is no building that has reached such potential. There are, in fact, no LEED certifications for such energy efficiency. The Suzlon One Earth office has all facilities available, it also turned out to be a land-scraper, inspired by the materials, elements, and techniques. There is a central water body on the campus which lowers the air temperature. 

residential green building case study in india

4. CII – Sohrabji Godrej Green Business Center 

CII Sohrabji Godrej Green Business Centre is first of its kind, which is a creative approach to the creation of a campus. It has green roofs and an open cafeteria. The materials used are brick, concrete, and fly ash bricks which are easily available thus cutting the transportation cost. 

Also, they have installed Solar Panels in the appropriate direction to have maximum usage and storage of solar energy. Taking Plan and Context into consideration they look like the combination of mushrooms grown in a forest.

residential green building case study in india

5. INFOSYS Campus, Pune 

Infosys campus in Pune is a LEED platinum certified campus that takes into consideration the working of a building as a whole and not just separate identities. Hence, it is constructed such that it looks like a spaceship, the advancement of technology has made it possible and will be welcoming further ground-breaking transformations. 

The energy efficiency in that aspect has taken a shoot while allowing a comfortable interior environment. The surroundings are mostly covered with a well-designed landscape.

residential green building case study in india

6. Godrej Plant13 Annexe, Mumbai

Godrej Plant 13 annex is an IGBC – Net Zero Rated Building. Plant 13 serves as the cafeteria for the entire Godrej campus, while housing offices as well as meeting and conference rooms. The building exemplifies the performance through its design, as someone enters the building. Through Data Analysis and conscious use, they’ve made development in increasing the performance of the building. Such thoughtful steps should not just be initiated by architects but organizations too. 

residential green building case study in india

7. CISCO Smart Campus, Bangalore

The Chief Globalization Officer, Win Elfrick prides himself for the execution of this infrastructure from a simple overlay and concept in his mind. There are eight buildings erected on the campus and the materials used are glass, steel, and RCC.

The campus is built like a mini-city. They have developed features and a pleasant work environment. There are buffer spaces, landscape areas, and a regulated water harvesting system which helps it achieve the status of a smart campus. 

8. Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, Delhi 

Environment Management is also an equally important part of designing an Airport as are the facilities and Security. In Delhi, they have concentrated more on the environment aftermath of construction, energy, and technology. They are practicing energy conservation, water conservation, and considering renewable energy resources. One major aspect is Greenhouse Gas Management at an airport and has to be taken care of properly. 

residential green building case study in india

9. Patni (I-gate) Knowledge Centre, Noida

PATNI Knowledge center in Noida is a LEED Platinum rated building which is a sustainable campus in Noida using some vernacular material, less energy usage, and better utilization of the green area. 75% area reserves the natural light, drip water irrigation, and a zero discharge building. The maximum usage of materials is recyclable.

residential green building case study in india

10. All Cargo – green building, Mumbai 

It is a perfect example of renovating an old building into a modern building with green Architectural features. Alignment of the bent fins with the curvilinear glass to complement the organic fins has added to the grace of the building. It has been converted into a monotony breaking façade that acts as a sunshade device.  The landscape is also developed with the use of pavers, cobblestones, and plants to enhance the building’s surroundings. 

residential green building case study in india

Ayushi is an architect and an enthusiastic reader and writer. She aspires to step a foot into the world of connecting architecture with writing, initiating with small steps. As said, there is no correct way to follow the dreams, she believes in the process and hustle throughout the journey.

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There is no doubt that living in a safe and sustainable environment has become the need of the hour. Buildings consume about 30-35% of the total energy consumption in India, and as a result of rapid economic and population growth, this consumption is rising at an alarming rate. A huge increase in demand for housing and expansion of commercial office spaces have caused a haphazard growth in Indian cities. While urban authorities are struggling to find solutions to this unraveling crisis, a few private players have made a determined effort to create a sustainable living space.

Nispana Innovative Platforms organized a conference on ‘Sustainability in Design and Construction India’ (SICI-2016) in Bengaluru to discuss the government policies on sustainability in construction and architectural design at the city level, along with hurdles and suggestions to reduce emissions and increase energy efficiency.

Case Studies of Sustainable Architecture in India

Some of the case studies of innovative green construction and sustainable architecture in India showcased at SICI-2016 are presented here:

Muziris Heritage Project

Sustainable-Architecture-in-India-Muziris-Heritage-Project

Dr. Benny Kuriakose showcased the Muziris Heritage Project undertaken to restore the historical and cultural significance of the legendary port of Muziris. Situated just outside the modern city of Kochi, this ancient port city was lost in antiquity due to a major flood that happened way back in 1340 AD. The oldest mention about Muziris is found in Sangam literature and chronicles of Greek historians, which stated it to be the most prominent spice trading port for Roman and Greek merchants.

Excavations began in 2006 in the present-day town of Kodangallur and the foundations of an ancient port were found. Interestingly the town has India’s first Muslim mosque, one of the oldest Jewish synagogues and a Marthoma Church all in the same vicinity. Soon, a major restoration project was launched through a public-private partnership to renovate the existing heritage buildings. It is the largest heritage conservation project undertaken in India worth INR94 crore, which was funded mainly by the Government of Kerala and the Archaeological Survey of India. Benny Kuriakose stated that these older structures were in a stable condition and in terms of energy efficiency, it is much better to restore an existing building rather than build a new one.

Green-Construction-in-India-GoodEarth

The next speaker Stanley George from GoodEarth asked an interesting question: Do you think technology can solve our environmental problems or can common sense do it? He explained with an example: when we restore a lake, do we use stone and cement to cover the banks or do we allow plants create a green blanket? If we blend traditional building practices with modern technology, we can find innovative solutions to the environmental crisis we face today, opined Stanley George.

Good Earth’s Malhar Footprints project is an ideal example of this blend of traditional building practices and modern technology, which is based on the philosophy of famous architect Laurie Baker,. Way back in 1995, Stanley George and team began by experimenting with alternatives in architecture, exploring concepts of holistic development, sustainable housing, organic farming and found an architectural style most suitable for Indian conditions. GoodEarth Malhar Footprints is an eco-friendly township spread over seven acres of land in Kengeri, Bengaluru. This gated community has houses built with compressed soil stabilized bricks made at the site and houses are extended around a network of landscaped courtyards with restricted vehicular movement.

GBCI Certification

GBCI-Certification

When asked about regulations on green buildings in India , Mili Majumdar clearly stated that mandatory regulations do not ensure compliance, rather there would be more violations than earlier. The current system of voluntary certification is a much better system since it not only ensures commitment to the cause, but also provides a chance to market the project in a big way. A LEED-certified building has much higher market value due to rising awareness about living in a better environment, opined Majumdar.

Sustainable Integrated Townships

Hiranandani-Gardens-Mumbai

Vasudevan Suresh, renowned housing expert and Vice Chairman of the National Building Code of India presented the case for building integrated townships in cities. Suresh stated that architects are responsible for not just building a project but tracking its entire lifecycle. Urban mobility, waste management and ensuring water safety are the prime concerns of urban authorities. However, the haphazard growth of Indian cities has created a massive infrastructural crisis where things have become unmanageable.

Suresh feels integrated townships such as Hiranandani Gardens in Mumbai, Mahindra Lifespaces in Chennai, Rajarhat Newtown in Kolkata are ideal solutions for the urban sprawl. If a workplace is built next door to a housing project, then the commute is reduced to walking or cycling. Similarly, if a shopping mall, a hospital, a school, a park and a commercial hub are all clustered together in one integrated township, that will reduce most of the urban infrastructural problems. For example, waste segregation and management will become easy since it will all be collected in one location, while providing WiFi net connectivity and large power backup will become economically feasible.

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From blueprint to eco-friendly reality: sustainable construction practices for a healthy environment, harnessing safety technology for sustainable and carbon neutral construction, can building-to-grid technology be game-changer for sustainable development in india.

You can also check out Greenland ashram done by Mr.Philippe in Tiruvannamalai. http://greenlandashram.com/

All structures were build using traditional mud wall techniques. Its extremely well done.

Good luck Levine.

eco-friendly houses by using ‘Glass Fibre Reinforced Gypsum’ (GFRG) panels. Please give us Contacts of Construction Agency in India.

Informative article. Thanks for sharing about eco-friendly houses. We can use water and solar energy solutions for the construction of homes.

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Home Case Study Library

Welcome to World Green Building Council’s Case Study Library. Here you can find examples of the world’s most cutting edge sustainable buildings. Each case study demonstrates outstanding performance of an operational building that complies with at least one of WorldGBC’s three strategic impact areas: Climate Action ; Health , Equity & Resilience ; and Resources & Circularity .

Explore the map below to find examples from across the globe!

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residential green building case study in india

Kaiser Permanente Santa Rosa Medical Office Building

Urbanización el paraíso, 1 new street square, 117 easy street, 18 king wah road, 218 electric road, 435 indioway, 62 kimpton rd, 84 harrington street, 945 front street, dpr construction office, a zero-water discharge community  , adam joseph lewis center for environmental studies, oberlin college, affordable housing project , alpine branch library, arch | nexus sac headquarters, arlington business park, arthaland century pacific tower, ash+ash rainwater capture & reuse, ballard emerald star zero energy home, bcci construction company, bcci south bay, bea 347. oficinas bioconstrucción, bergen inclusion centre, birch house, bishop o’dowd high school environmental science center, booth transport logistics and distribution hub, bürogebäude herdweg 19, burwood brickworks shopping centre, camisas polo salvador, casa laguna, center for intelligent buildings tm, centre block, chai wan campus for the technological and higher education institute of hong kong (thei), city hall freiburg, construction industry council – zero carbon park, cooperative housing , craven gap residence, creating adequate, sustainable, and affordable housing through pension fund capital , cwra cape town, design engineers, disaster resilience retrofits , discovery elementary school, double cove residential development, east liberty presbyterian church, echohaven house, edificio lucia, el camino apartments , elobau logistics centre, energy+home1.0, enhancing lives of refugees , entegrity headquarters, entrepatios las carolinas, filiale kirchheimbolanden, five elements harvest house, floth 69 robertson street, fortitude valley, gibbons street , globicon terminals, green idea house, habitat lab, hadera alfa kindergartens, highland dr, hks chicago living lab, honda smart home us, ideas “z squared” office, indigo hammond + playle architects net pos energy office, integral group, toronto, integral office, oakland, interface global headquarters, irota ecolodge, j.p. morgan chase headquarters (under construction), kāinga ora – homes and communities, king county parks north utility maintenance facility, king street, knauf insulation experience center, lakeline learning center, langes haus, lincoln net positive farmhouse, lombardo welcome center – millersville university, madrona passive house, minneapolis net zero victorian, mohawk college the joyce centre for partnership & innovation, morningside crossing, mvule gardens , nasa sustainability base, ncr corporate headquarters, spring at 8th, nex shopping mall, ohm sweet ohm, packard foundation headquarters, panda passage, petinelli curitiba, phare building, noor solar complex, pitzer college robert redford conservancy, plantronics european office, pyörre house, quay quarter tower, rayside labossière architectes, renovating 32 terraced houses, enhancing satisfaction and comfort , residência loft, rocky road straw bale | community rebuilds, saint-gobain and certainteed north american headquarters, salyani housing project, sede rac engenharia, sfo – 1057 – airfield operations facility (aof), social housing , taft faculty house, te mirumiru early childhood education centre, kawakawa, te papa peninsula, the cork haus, the palestinian museum, the recycled houses, the rmi innovation center, toronto dominion centre, ernst and yonge tower, tour elithis danube, tour elithis dijon, trasciende la parroquia, univercity childcare center, university of california, berkeley haas school of business, ward village, wilde lake middle school, wo lee fabrication & distribution center, wsp brisbane fitout, xiao jing wan university, yitpi yartapuultiku.

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residential green building case study in india

Anup Kumar Prasad

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1. Traditional Indian Architecture 2. Bamboo Guest House Extension - Kolkata 3. Institute of Rural Research and Development - Gurgaon 4. The Energy and Research Institute, University - Delhi 5. CII Shobraj Godrej Green Business Centre - Hyderabad 6. IIT Green Centre - Gurgaon 7. Centre for Environment Education - Ahmedabad

residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

Case Studies & Resources

Building policy, methodology for retv formula development for ens 2018, document type: research paper, december 2018.

Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018 (ENS) is the new Energy Conservation Building Code for Residential Buildings (ECBC-R). Among different code provisions, a maximum Residential Envelope Transmittance Value (RETV) is defined for cooling dominated climates. RETV gives a quantitative measure of heat gains through the building envelope (excluding roof), calculated by a simple formula. This paper describes detailed methodology followed for the development of the RETV formula.

MethodologyforRFormulaDevelopmentforENS2018

Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018(ECBC-R Part I: Building Envelope)

Document type: code.

Given the pace at which building stock is growing in India, the Eco-Niwas Samhita for Building Envelope is a landmark policy ushering energy efficiency into the building sector, relevant for all contributors to the construction process. Read the details of the policy here.

Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018 Film

Document type: video.

Eco-Niwas Samhita for Building Envelope is an important step towards ensuring that all new buildings being constructed in the sector are energy efficient. This video delves into the highlights of this simple Code and what each stakeholder needs to do to adhere to it.

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Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018 Compliance Tool

Document type: tool.

The Eco-Niwas Samhita is a residential code designed in an easy-to-use format, and requires only simple calculations based on inputs from architectural design drawings of the buildings. This online tool further aids in the calculations and compliance check.

Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018 Brochure

Document type: brochure.

Given the pace at which building stock is growing in India, the Eco-Niwas Samhita is a landmark policy ushering energy efficiency into the building sector, relevant for all contributors to the construction process. Read the details of the code here.

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Design Guidelines for Energy-Efficient Multi-Storey Residential Buildings: Warm-Humid Climate

Document type: design guidelines, november 2016.

The design guideline provides 14 recommendations on energy-efficiency features for consideration at the design stage of multi-storey residential buildings. Mr Piyush Goyal, Honourable Minister of State (IC) for Power, Coal, New and Renewable Energy and Mines, launched this document in November 2016 at the BEEP International Conference on Energy Efficient Building Design.

Design Guidelines for Energy-Efficient Multi-Storey Residential Buildings: Composite and Hot-Dry Climate

September 2014.

The Design Guidelines for Energy-efficient Multi-storey Residential Buildings for Composite and Hot-dry Climates has been developed under component-3 of BEEP’s technical assistance mandate. The design guidelines provide 15 recommendations on energy-efficiency features for consideration at the design stage of multi-storey residential buildings. The guidelines are helpful for builders, developers, architects, and other building-sector professionals involved in the design and construction of multi-storey residential buildings.

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Energy Efficient Homes

Document type: presentation.

With the exponential rise in residential complexes being developed in the country, there is a need to ensure that these homes are thermally comfortable and energy efficient. Read on to understand the key factors that need to be considered while designing residential buildings.

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Position paper on Low Carbon Resource-Efficient Affordable Housing

Document type: published paper.

The position paper was developed under the capaCITIES programme of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) in India. As BEEP has been working in this area since 2011, it made a significant contribution in the development of this paper.

Guidelines for Energy-Efficient and Thermally Comfortable Public Buildings in Karnataka

September 2016.

BEEP and Public Works Department, Karnataka, have collaborated on various aspects of energy-efficient building design. Several design workshops were conducted to develop energy-efficient designs for specific public buildings, including the District Court and other district office buildings. The knowledge gained through these collaborative efforts is compiled and presented in this document. The guidelines have been developed keeping in view different climatic regions found in Karnataka and provides a step-by-step approach to designing energy-efficient buildings. The content of the guidelines covers details on the integrated design process, climate analysis for Karnataka, climate-responsive design, efficient cooling systems, and solar energy integration.  The guidelines will be useful for architects, engineers, and building project managers.

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Mainstreaming Energy Efficient Building Design Practices in State Public Works Departments

Document type: published paper, december 2017.

The paper is based on the experience of working with the public works departments (PWDs) and other state departments responsible for the construction of public buildings in Karnataka, Rajasthan, and Andhra Pradesh. State PWDs and other similar government departments responsible for the construction of public buildings in the states have an important role not only in making the public buildings energy-efficient and thermally comfortable but also in the implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC). The paper presents the various approaches and lessons gained in this process, along with ideas for more effective engagement with the state PWDs to mainstream energy-efficient building design practices within the department.

Energy Performance of Indian Commercial Buildings

How much electricity does Indian commercial buildings consume? It is essential that there is measured performance data of buildings, to ensure that it is performing as expected during the design stage.

Building Design

Energy efficency in hvac system: case study of a hospital building camparing predicted and actual performance and showing improvements through performance monitoring, february 2020.

The Jupiter Hospital in Pune is a 350-bed multi-speciality hospital. This paper focuses on the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system performance of Jupiter Hospital. The Jupiter Hospital was designed as an energy efficient building in order to harness the potential to save energy by incorporating energy efficiency measures in the HVAC systems. The measures in this case include building envelope measures to reduce cooling load, optimum size of the chillier with good part load performance, and other technologies such as recovery through enthalpy wheel for fresh air and the innovative use of condensers.

Energise Proceedings cover page

ASSESSING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDING ENVELOPE OF NEW RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS USING RETV

The Eco-Niwas Samhita was launched in 2018 to set energy efficiency standards for residential buildings. The building code uses a parameter called Residential Envelope Transmittance Value (RETV) to define thermal performance of the building envelope (excluding roof) for cooling dominated climates. This paper presents evaluation of RETV of sample residential projects located in composite and warm-humid climate regions, after studying both individual and multi storey apartments.

A CASE STUDY ON DESIGN OF THERMALLY COMFORTABLE AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN COMPOSITE CLIMATE: SIMULATION RESULTS AND MONITORED PERFORMANCE

With the growing urbanization that India is seeing, affordable housing has been a priority for the building sector and the government. The focus of current affordable housing projects should be on an acceptable level of thermal comfort for the occupant without the use of air conditioning. This paper presents a case study of integrating energy efficient envelope and ventilation strategies in Smart Ghar, the Pradhan Mantri Awaz Yojana (PMAY) affordable housing project in Rajkot, Gujarat.

 THERMALLY COMFORTABLE

Smart Ghar III, Rajkot

September 2019.

Affordable thermally comfortable housing is the need of the hour, given growing urbanisation in India and the effect this shift is having on the environment. Smart GHAR III is an affordable homes project in Rajkot, Gujarat under the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (PMAY) Untenable Slum Redevelopment and executed by the Rajkot Municipal Corporation (RMC). The project employees simple, yet highly effective mechanisms and strategies as part of its energy efficient building design. This ensures thermal comfort for residents without the need for external heating and/or cooling devices to keep energy bills to the minimum.

Charrette Film

Many factors contribute to energy consumption in a building. And many stakeholders are involved in the design and construction of a building. To design a high energy-performance and thermally comfortable building, all the factors must be considered; and all the stakeholders must be on-board. The integrated design charrette of BEEP is an interactive workshop, held over four days, which brings together the building design team and senior Swiss experts to develop the energy concept of a building during the early phase of building design. Learn more about the BEEP Integrated Design Charrette in this video.

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Smart GHAR III, Rajkot

Document type: case study.

Smart GHAR III (Green Homes at Affordable Rate) is an affordable housing project in Rajkot under the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (PMAY) Untenable Slum Redevelopment, executed by the Rajkot Municipal Corporation (RMC). The charrette for this project was held in September 2016. Built on 57,408 m2, the building has been designed for composite climate. The strategies recommended during the charrette included reducing heat gains through walls and roofs; improved window design; and improved ventilation through common service shaft.

Energy Efficient Building Envelope and Ventilation Strategies for Multi-Storey Residential Buildings in India

This paper is based on research on energy use in dwellings and energy modeling of typical spaces in dwellings. The paper presents key strategies for designing energy-efficient multi-storey residential buildings based on the results obtained by integrating energy-efficient envelope and ventilation strategies in sample bedrooms of three multi-storey residential projects: Indore (composite climate); Chennai (warm and humid climate); and Rajkot (composite climate). The experience from these three projects shows that a reduction in peak operative temperatures in the range of 4–7 °C is possible by implementing these strategies.

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Aranya Bhawan, Jaipur

Aranya Bhawan, the office building of the Rajasthan Forest Department in Jaipur, was one of the first projects selected for the BEEP Integrated Design Charrette. The charrete was held in December 2012. The project was carried out by the Rajasthan State Road Development and Construction Corporation Limited (RSRDC) and was inaugurated on 23 March 2015 by the Smt. Vasundhara Raje, Honorable Chief Minister of Rajasthan.

Case Study of An Energy Efficient Commercial Building: Validating Design Intent & Energy Simulation Results with Monitored Performance Data

The paper presents case study of an energy efficient day-use public office building, Aranya Bhawan, the headquarters of the Rajasthan Forest Department in composite climate (Jaipur). The paper provides details about:

  • Energy efficiency measures adopted in the building.
  • Results of the building energy simulation during the building design.
  • Methodology and results of the performance monitoring of the fully functional building for one-year period.
  • Results of checking compliance with ECBC

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IIIDEM, Dwarka

The India International Institute of Democracy and Election Management (IIIDEM), set up in 2011, is an advanced resource centre for learning, research, training, and extension for participatory democracy and election management. IIIDEM used to be function from Nirvachan Sadan, but due to the space constraints the Election Commission of India (ECI) decided to develop an independent campus for IIIDEM. A charrette was organized in July 2014 when the new campus in Dwarka was proposed.

Jupiter Hospital, Pune

Jupiter Hospital in Pune is a 350-bed multi-specialty hospital and the second project under Jupiter Lifeline Hospitals Ltd. This was the 8th project selected for the BEEP Integrated Design Charrette, which was held in February 2014. The project was completed in December 2016.

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BEEP Integrated Design Charrette

The BEEP integrated design charrette is an interactive workshop, held over four days. It brings together the building design team and senior Swiss experts to develop the energy concept of a building during the early phase of building design.

Passive Measures for Energy Efficiency

Before we start using air-conditioners, fans, heaters, artificial lights, etc. to make our buildings comfortable and well-lit, we need to design our building and the building envelope to control comfort and daylight to the maximum extent possible. This is called passive design. Passive design takes climate into consideration and lessens our dependence on electricity and other fuels.

Tools & Technologies

Insulation for buildings.

A thermos flask preserves the temperature of hot or cold drinks by reducing the heat loss or heat gain. In a similar manner, insulating materials for buildings can help in keeping the building cooled or heated by reducing the heat gain or heat loss to ambient. Here you have a knowledge package on insulating materials for building that includes the fundamentals of insulation, information on all types of insulating materials for buildings, their application in buildings, energy saving potential, and case studies.

Booklet on Thermal Insulation of Buildings for Energy Efficiency

The publication, Thermal Insulation of Buildings for Energy Efficiency, outlines various important aspects related to building insulation materials, ranging from the principles of building science to the application of materials in buildings. It carries the specifications and testing standards of building insulation materials developed by the Bureau of Indian Standards and the prescriptive compliance requirements for using insulation in commercial buildings covered under the Energy Conservation Building Code (2007), Ministry of Power. It also addresses several important issues related to insulation materials and the salient initiatives undertaken by BEEP. It provides practice-oriented background information for building designers, architects, and various other stakeholders in the building construction industry.

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Training Manual on Measuring the Characteristics of Thermal Properties of Building Insulation Materials

Document type: training manual.

Prof. Claud-Alain Roulet, a senior Swiss expert, has developed a training manual on testing the thermal properties of building insulation, which is a critical component of the technical assistance that BEEP provides towards developing building material testing infrastructure. Launched in June 2015 by H.E. Dr Linus von Castelmur, Ambassador of Switzerland to India and Bhutan in New Delhi, this manual is meant for training professionals working in lab facilities.

Energy Efficiency in District Cooling System

The setting up of new districts and neighbourhoods has led to a demand for centralized district cooling systems. However, designing such systems keeping energy efficiency as the prime objective is a difficult task. The presentation helps in addressing these issues.

Earth Air Tunnel (EAT)

The deep soil temperature of the earth remains almost the same as the average annual air temperature. By laying an underground pipe and passing the air through it, you can cool or heat the space. Sounds interesting? Here, you have a comprehensive knowledge package on EAT, which includes the basic principles, design basics, numerical tools with user manual, case studies, and the design exercise.

Radiant Cooling System

Human beings normally feel the average temperature of the surrounding surfaces such as wall, roof, floor, and air. Not just the air temperature as perceived. Radiant cooling system works on the principle of cooling the surrounding surface to do the space cooling. These systems can easily save 20%–40% energy as compared to a conventional cooling system. Want to know more about it? Here, you have a training module on radiant cooling systems that covers the basic principles of heat exchange, radiant cooling system types, working principle, its application, sizing calculations, moisture handling, integration with overall HVA system, design and performance evaluation, a tutorial on modelling these systems in ‘DesignBuilder’, and a few case studies.

Energy Simulation Tools

Energy simulation tools are useful for designing and calculating the performance of various design and system alternatives. They help in quantifying the performance parameters ‘and thereby in decision making. However, the selection of an appropriate energy simulation tool and its use in the best possible way always remain a challenge. The package here gives you a list of energy simulation tools, their capabilities and suitability, guidelines for quality assurance, and guidelines to simulate selected technology sets along with examples.

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Issue Cover

Article Contents

Introduction, 1 overview: energy conservation in india, 2 literature survey, 3 research and collection of data, 4 material and methods, 5 conclusion, conflict of interest.

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Bridging the energy gap of India’s residential buildings by using rooftop solar PV systems for higher energy stars

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Rakesh Dalal, Kamal Bansal, Sapan Thapar, Bridging the energy gap of India’s residential buildings by using rooftop solar PV systems for higher energy stars, Clean Energy , Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2021, Pages 423–432, https://doi.org/10.1093/ce/zkab017

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The residential-building sector in India consumes >25% of the total electricity and is the third-largest consumer of electricity; consumption increased by 26% between 2014 and 2017. India has introduced a star-labelling programme for residential buildings that is applicable for all single- and multiple-dwelling units in the country for residential purposes. The Energy Performance Index (EPI) of a building (annual energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per square metre of the building) is taken as an indicator for awarding the star label for residential buildings. For gauging the EPI status of existing buildings, the electricity consumption of residential buildings (in kWh/m 2 /year) is established through a case study of the residential society. Two years of electricity bills are collected for an Indian residential society located in Palam, Delhi, analysed and benchmarked with the Indian residential star-labelling programme. A wide EPI gap is observed for existing buildings for five-star energy labels. Based on existing electricity tariffs, the energy consumption of residential consumers and the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE)’s proposed building ENERGY STAR labelling, a grid-integrated rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) system is considered for achieving a higher star label. This research study establishes the potential of grid-connected rooftop solar PV systems for residential buildings in Indian cities through a case study of Delhi. Techno-economic analysis of a grid-integrated 3-kWp rooftop solar PV plant is analysed by using RETScreen software. The study establishes that an additional two stars can be achieved by existing buildings by using a grid-integrated rooftop solar PV plant. Payback for retrofit of a 3-kWp rooftop solar PV plant for Indian cites varies from 3 to 7 years.

A case study in Delhi, India establishes the potential of grid-connected rooftop solar PV systems for residential buildings. Techno-economic analysis of grid integrated, 3 kWp rooftop solar systems estimates a payback period from 3 to 7 years.

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India, with a population of >1.3 billion, is the second-most populous country in the world and the third-largest economy in terms of Purchasing Power Parity. India has set a target economy of USD5 trillion by the year 2024–25 with an annual growth rate of 9%. India’s sustained economic growth in this period will require an enormous energy supply. Key indicators of the economy, population and energy between the years 2001 and 2017 are shown in Fig. 1 . India intends to reduce the emissions intensity of its gross domestic product by 33–35% by 2030 from the 2005 level [ 1 ]. For achieving this target, improvement in energy efficiency is required in all sectors, especially in the building sector, as the building sector in India consumes >30% of the total electricity [ 2 ].

Trend in the economy, population and energy [29]

Trend in the economy, population and energy [ 29 ]

The gross electricity consumption in residential buildings has been rising sharply over the years. Building energy-consumption figures rose to ~260 TWh in 2016–17, which was ~55 TWh in 1996–97 [ 3 ]. It is estimated that this will further increase in the range of 630–940 TWh by 2032 [ 4 ].

To address energy efficiency in the commercial building sector, the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) was launched in 2007 [ 5 ]. The code applies to buildings with a connected load of ≥500 kW or a contact demand of ≥600 kVA. In 2017, ECBC 2007 was modified to ECBC 2017 and applies to buildings or building complexes that have a connected load of ≥100 kW or a contract demand of 120 kVA. The ECBC provides minimum requirements for the energy-efficient design and construction of buildings. The code was extended to the residential buildings through ECBC 2018-R (Eco-Home guidelines) and it applies to all the residential-use buildings built on a plot area of ≥500 m 2 .

The star-labelling programme for all single- and multiple-dwelling residential units has been initiated by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) [ 6 ]. There is no minimum requirement for the area or connected load (kW) for a building dwelling unit to be covered under this labelling programme. The Energy Performance Index (EPI) of a building (annual energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per square metre of the building) is taken as an indicator for the star label of the building. The EPI includes three components, namely E1, E2 and E3. E1 and E2 include building envelope characteristics, lighting systems and comfort systems (air conditioners (ACs)). The calculation is made with the assumption that 25% of the space in the building is air-conditioned with 24°C as the set point (E1) and the remaining 75% of the space is naturally ventilated (E2). The EPI (E3) for other building appliances such as microwave ovens, grinders, refrigerators, TVs, water pumps, washing machines, etc. is considered to be in the range of 7–9. The EPI required for star labelling for different climate regions is tabulated in Table 1 considering the value of E2 as 8.

Residential-building EPI (X) for star labelling [ 6 ]

StarsCompositeWarm and humidHot and dryTemperate
1 star60 < X ≤ 6866 < X ≤ 7263 < X ≤ 7536 < X ≤ 39
2 star53 < X ≤ 6057 < X ≤ 6555 < X ≤ 6332 < X ≤ 36
3 star45 < X ≤ 5347 < X ≤ 5746 < X ≤ 5529 < X ≤ 32
4 star37 < X ≤ 4538 < X ≤ 4737 < X ≤ 4625 < X ≤ 29
5 starX ≤ 37X ≤ 38X ≤ 37X ≤ 25
StarsCompositeWarm and humidHot and dryTemperate
1 star60 < X ≤ 6866 < X ≤ 7263 < X ≤ 7536 < X ≤ 39
2 star53 < X ≤ 6057 < X ≤ 6555 < X ≤ 6332 < X ≤ 36
3 star45 < X ≤ 5347 < X ≤ 5746 < X ≤ 5529 < X ≤ 32
4 star37 < X ≤ 4538 < X ≤ 4737 < X ≤ 4625 < X ≤ 29
5 starX ≤ 37X ≤ 38X ≤ 37X ≤ 25

The objective of this research study is to calculate the energy potential of grid-connected photovoltaic arrays on residential-building roofs for achieving the desired five-star energy labelling. The primary data come from a survey of the energy consumption of urban households located in Delhi and consumers are categorized based on their annual energy consumption. For the selection of appropriate rooftop solar PV plants, the energy consumption of the buildings, the electricity tariffs for the residential sector, the government subsidy on rooftop solar PV and the BEE’s proposed star labelling for residential buildings were considered. We were thus able to estimate the economic potential of rooftop solar PV systems by utilizing the unused roof area of the building. The final section of the article presents the conclusions that can be derived from this study.

This is probably the first such study to have explored the star labelling of existing residential buildings in India; it was searched in Google Scholar with different combinations of words and no such study was found that covered this problem statement. The findings of the study may be considered for fine-tuning policies and developing relevant intervention tools for existing building occupants for achieving the building star label through government rooftop solar PV subsidies.

India’s basic framework for electricity generation and supply was provided by the Electricity Act, 1910. After independence in 1947, social progress and development were given impetus and policies were directed for ensuring the supply of energy to all stakeholders. Energy-conservation measures were started in the year 1970 when the primary focus was to reduce the consumption of petroleum. In 1981, the Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Energy Conservation (IMWG), through 200 energy audits, predicted energy savings of Rs 19.25 billion by investing in energy-saving technologies. In 2001, the Energy Conservation Bill was passed and the Energy Management Centre was reconstituted as the BEE in 2002 [ 7 ].

The increasing population, energy shortage and awareness of environment-related issues (such as greenhouse-gas emissions) have raised concerns worldwide about current trends in energy consumption. In India, the estimated electricity consumption in the last 10 years increased from 612 645 GWh (2009–10) to 1 158 310 GWh (2018–19), which corresponds to a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.58%. The per-capita energy consumption increased from 19 669 Megajoules in 2011–12 to 24 453 Megajoules in 2018–19 with a CAGR of 3.67% [ 8 ]. Electricity consumption by different sectors of India in 2018–19 is given in Fig. 2 and the domestic sector consumes 24% of the total energy [ 9 ].

Consumption of electricity by sectors during 2018–19 [9]

Consumption of electricity by sectors during 2018–19 [ 9 ]

The BEE started the Perform Achieve and Trade (PAT) programme, which is a regulatory instrument for reducing specific energy consumption in energy-intensive designated consumers (DCs). It also dovetailed with a market mechanism to enhance the cost-effectiveness through the certification of excess energy saving that can be traded in energy exchanges. The first PAT cycle, which was completed in March 2015, achieved an energy saving of 8.67 million tons of oil equivalent (Mtoe), which was ~30% more than the target. The second PAT cycle (2016–19) included three industries in addition to eight industries of the PAT–I cycle and seeks to achieve an energy-saving target of 8.86 Mtoe [ 10 ].

Standard and Labeling (S&L) in India works on a model in which the vendor provides information related to the energy efficiency of the product on the label as prescribed by the BEE. A star rating, ranging from one to five in ascending order of energy efficiency, is provided for products registered. An endorsement label is also provided for 23 products, of which 10 are mandatory and 13 are voluntary. The impact of this programme is visible from the sale of star-label ACs in the market, as shown in Fig. 3 . The weighted average of the Indian seasonal energy-efficiency ratio of ACs increased from 2.80 (in FY 2011) to 3.70 (in FY 2017–18) [ 11 ]. Forty percent of the energy consumed by room ACs could be saved cost-effectively by enhancing their efficiency. This translates into a potential energy saving of 118 TWh at busbars or a peak-demand saving of 60 GW by 2030 [ 12 ].

Star-label AC distribution 2017–18 [11]

Star-label AC distribution 2017–18 [ 11 ]

The British Petroleum report has indicated that the global energy demand has grown in the 10 years from 2007 to 2017 [ 13 ]. Oil consumption will grow by 30% from 2007 to 2035, while coal and natural-gas consumption will increase by 50%. The International Energy Agency predicts that with a business-as-usual scenario, the energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) will double by 2050 [ 14 ]. Globally, the building sector is responsible for consuming >40% of the total energy consumption [ 15 ]. Poor energy performance of existing buildings is observed around the world [ 16 ]. A mix of technologies can enhance the energy performance of buildings [ 17 ]. Green buildings have proven their performance but still they have not percolated into the market [ 18 ].

As per the US Energy Information Administration, by the implementation of energy codes and updated efficiency standards for appliances, the USA could save 3.79 trillion joules [ 19 ]. Hong Kong’s building energy code has improved energy efficiency and also reduced air pollution [ 20 ]. Enforcement of Chinese national building standards led to a 62% energy saving in public buildings and the building code of the UK revealed energy savings of ≤75% [ 21 ]. Florida’s residential energy code has resulted in a decrease in electricity consumption and a 6% decrease in natural-gas consumption [ 22 ]. Energy savings of 31.4% and peak savings of 36.8% were recorded for high-rise apartments in Hong Kong by adopting passive energy-efficient strategies [ 23 ]. In Greece, the thermal insulation of walls, roofs and floors, and low-infiltration strategies reduced energy consumption by 20–40% and 20%, respectively [ 24 ]. A study in Arizona of energy-star buildings before and after the buildings’ certification showed that the occupants’ consumed 8% less energy on a monthly basis after certification [ 25 ]. The effectiveness of the ENERGY STAR programme for residences in Alachua County, Florida, was analysed using monthly residential energy-consumption data between 2000 and 2013; energy savings of 10.9% were found under Florida Building Code (FBC) 1997 and 18.6% under FBC 2001 [ 26 ]. For the top 25 percentile of buildings in Singapore that are eligible for the star label in terms of an energy-efficiency label, the energy-usage intensity of 178 kWh/m 2 is comparable to the US ENERGY STAR buildings’ best practice in Californian office buildings [ 27 ]. Office buildings with ENERGY STAR or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) eco-labels get rental premiums of ~3–5%. Dual certification fetches an estimated rental premium of 9%. The sale-price premium for ENERGY STAR- and LEED-labelled office buildings are 18% and 25%, respectively [ 28 ].

In 2005, India’s residential and commercial floor area was estimated to be 1.6 and 0.5 billion m 2 , respectively, which increased to 3.5 and 1 billion m 2 in 2012. It is also estimated that, by 2030, residential and commercial floor space will increase to 7.0 and 1.5 billion m 2 [ 18 ]. The residential sector is the third-largest consumer of electricity and increased by 26% between 2014 and 2017 as shown in Fig. 4 [ 29 ].

Electricity consumption in different sectors (IEA India Report, 2020) [29]

Electricity consumption in different sectors (IEA India Report, 2020) [ 29 ]

By implementing energy-conservation measures recommended by the ECBC, small buildings can save ≤40% of the energy used as compared to present buildings in India [ 30 ]. The ECBC could generate a saving of 419 800 GWh in the Gujarat state between 2010 and 2050. Extending the ECBC beyond the commercial sector could achieve additional savings of 193 700 GWh between 2010 and 2050 [ 31 ]. A study of six categories of commercial buildings in Jaipur city (India) has established that the implementation of the ECBC can conserve energy by ≤42% [ 32 ]. ECBC compliance in hotel buildings in Jaipur results in saving energy in the range of 18.42–37.2% [ 33 ]. Another study estimates that buildings in Ahmedabad city (India) could reduce their cooling load by 31% by using the ECBC code for envelope design [ 34 ].

India has a renewable-energy target of 175 GW by 2022. Solar energy will contribute 100 GW; of this, 40 GW would be from rooftop solar PV systems. India had already installed 28 GW of solar capacity as of March 2019 [ 35 ]. The progress of installation from 2010 to March 2019 is shown in Fig. 5 . Rooftop solar PV installation reached 5.4 GW in December 2019 and installation is predominately in industrial and commercial buildings. The distribution of rooftop solar PV systems in the different sectors is shown in Fig. 6 .

Grid-integrated solar PV rooftop installations in India (2010–19) [35]

Grid-integrated solar PV rooftop installations in India (2010–19) [ 35 ]

Distribution of installed rooftop solar PV systems up to December 2019 [49]

Distribution of installed rooftop solar PV systems up to December 2019 [ 49 ]

A study of Andalusia (Spain) suggests that rooftop solar PV systems would satisfy 78.89% of the residential energy demand [ 36 ]. In the USA (2015), with residential solar incentives, 18 of the 51 target cities could reach the break-even point [ 37 ]. A study of the city of Al-Khobar in Saudi Arabia suggests that villas and apartment buildings can offset 19% of their electricity demand by utilizing rooftop solar PV systems, when 25% of the building roof for solar PV systems and cooling loads also reduces by 2% due to the shading effect of panels [ 38 ]. In the USA, with subsidies, six states have reached socket parity, yet widespread parity has still not been achieved [ 39 ]. In Malaysia, a grid-connected residential solar PV system is found to be feasible for installation [ 40 ]. A study shows that a 5-kWp PV system in Egypt can provide 67.5% of the energy requirement for residential consumers [ 41 ].

A study of the rooftop solar photovoltaic potential for Mumbai (India) suggests that it can meet 12.8–20% of the daily energy demand [ 42 ]. Simulation of a 6.4-kW rooftop solar PV plant for Ujjain (India) demonstrated that it not only meets building energy demand, but also feeds surplus energy of 8450 kWh annually into the grid [ 43 ]. Computer simulation of the installation of the rooftop PV system at five locations in India shows that the energy required for a roof-induced cooling load decreased by between 73% and 90% [ 44 ]. Energy simulation of a 110-kWp stand-alone rooftop solar PV system for Bhopal (India) demonstrated a payback period of 8.2 years [ 45 ]. A grid-connected solar PV system net present cost becomes 0 at ~1.8 and 3.4 kW, and the cost of energy decreased with an increase in the capacity addition for the household [ 46 ].

The present work is a study on the star labelling of residential buildings in India that investigates the residential-building energy consumption and existing gap for star labelling promulgated by the BEE. This study also aims to estimate the overall impact of rooftop solar PV system application in a hot-dry climate in achieving a higher star label. The key objectives of the study are to:

quantify the residential-building energy consumption (kWh/m 2 /year) through a case study;

estimate the energy gap for star labelling and bridging this gap through rooftop solar PV systems;

establish the economics of rooftop solar PV systems for residential buildings.

The study has been undertaken for residential buildings in the Palam area of New Delhi, India. The details of the location are given in Table 2 . The distribution of flats as per the RETScreen version 8 (a software program developed by Natural Resource Canada [ 47 ]) location module is given in Fig. 7 .

Location details (obtained from RETScreen location tab)

Latitude28.6° N
Longitude 77.1° E
Climate zone1B—very hot-dry
Elevation 217 m
Latitude28.6° N
Longitude 77.1° E
Climate zone1B—very hot-dry
Elevation 217 m

RETScreen software representation and distribution in the flats

RETScreen software representation and distribution in the flats

The residential block is a two-storey structure consisting of four houses with two basements for parking. The ground coverage of the building block is 314 m 2 and the carpet area is 628 m 2 . The campus has 81 such blocks, accommodating 324 houses.

4.1 Step 1: energy-consumption estimation

Electricity-consumption data for all of the buildings were collected for the period April 2017 to March 2019 from the society management office. The annual energy-consumption distribution of these houses is shown in Fig. 8 .

Distribution of houses based on annual energy consumption (analysis based on a survey of households)

Distribution of houses based on annual energy consumption (analysis based on a survey of households)

The average annual residential energy consumption for the year 2017–18 was 7236.72 kWh, which increased to 8101.34 kWh in the year 2018–19. The sole source of energy for the buildings is electricity supplied by BSES Rajdhani Power Limited (BRPL), a distributor for south and west Delhi, and no other source of energy is deployed by the society or building occupants. The electricity tariff for the residential building in Delhi is based on energy consumption. The electricity price rates for the year 2019–20 for consumption are categorized into five stages and the same is tabulated in Table 3 .

Electricity tariff for Delhi residential houses 2019–20 [ 51 ]

Sl. no.Energy consumption (kWh)Energy charges (Rs/kWh)
1≤2003.00
2201–4004.50
3401–8006.50
4801–12007.00
5>12008.00
Sl. no.Energy consumption (kWh)Energy charges (Rs/kWh)
1≤2003.00
2201–4004.50
3401–8006.50
4801–12007.00
5>12008.00

Based on the residential energy consumption, consumers are classified into four groups, which are tabulated in Table 4 .

Consumer categorization based on energy consumption per annum

GroupCategorizationEnergy consumption (E)/annum (kWh)
ALow E ≤ 4800
BModerate4800 < E ≤ 9600
CHigh9600 < E ≤ 14 400
DVery highE > 14 400
GroupCategorizationEnergy consumption (E)/annum (kWh)
ALow E ≤ 4800
BModerate4800 < E ≤ 9600
CHigh9600 < E ≤ 14 400
DVery highE > 14 400

Distribution of the consumers based on energy consumption in 2017–18 and 2018–19 is given in Fig. 9 and Fig. 10 , respectively, and it is evident that the majority (>75%) of the end users are moderate energy consumers and that, by taking suitable energy substitutions, the desired star label can be achieved.

Distribution of consumer-based electricity consumption 2017–18 (author analysis based on a survey of select households)

Distribution of consumer-based electricity consumption 2017–18 (author analysis based on a survey of select households)

Distribution of consumer-based electricity consumption 2018–19 (analysis based on a survey of select households)

Distribution of consumer-based electricity consumption 2018–19 (analysis based on a survey of select households)

The energy consumption of the residential consumers under study increased from 2017–18 to 2018–19 and, as a result, the moderate and low energy consumer category percentage reduced from 75% and 14% to 65% and 10%, respectively, whereas the high energy consumer category increased from 8% to 23%.

4.2 Step 2: calculation of the technical performance of rooftop solar PV systems

Three rooftop solar scenarios are considered for residential buildings based on the present energy consumption and available area on the rooftop. The calculation for these three scenarios is carried out using a solar rooftop financial calculator hosted on the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) website ( https://mnre.gov.in/ ) and is tabulated in Table 5 .

Residential solar rooftop PV evaluation [ 47 ]

Roof area (150 m ) utilization percentage Roof area utilized by solar PV plant (m )Solar plant (kW )The energy produced (kWh)/yearMNRE benchmark cost (Rs)
20303414075 600
264045520106 600
335056900139 400
Roof area (150 m ) utilization percentage Roof area utilized by solar PV plant (m )Solar plant (kW )The energy produced (kWh)/yearMNRE benchmark cost (Rs)
20303414075 600
264045520106 600
335056900139 400

The cost of the proposed solar PV plant is based on the MNRE benchmark cost that also includes subsidies extended by the MNRE. The MNRE gives a flat 40% subsidy on solar PV plants rating ≤3 kW and a 20% subsidy for solar PV plants rating >3 kW up to 10 kW. The selected site receives an average of 5.06 kWh/m 2 /day solar radiation horizontal and its monthly availability is given in Fig. 11 .

Monthly solar radiation horizontal availability at the site (analysis based on RETScreen simulation) [48]

Monthly solar radiation horizontal availability at the site (analysis based on RETScreen simulation) [ 48 ]

4.3 Step 3: simulation and economic analysis of solar rooftop PV plants

The electricity generated from the PV system that was calculated in Table 5 was validated by using RETScreen version 8 [ 48 ]. The energy output obtained from RETScreen is within a tolerance of 5% as compared to results obtained from the MNRE solar PV rooftop calculator ( Table 6 ).

Technical evaluation of residential solar PV rooftop using RETScreen energy module

Roof area (150 m ) utilization percentage Roof area utilized by solar PV plant (m )Solar plant (kW )Energy produced (kWh)/year
203034320
264045760
335057200
Roof area (150 m ) utilization percentage Roof area utilized by solar PV plant (m )Solar plant (kW )Energy produced (kWh)/year
203034320
264045760
335057200

Analysing the residential electricity tariff ( Table 3 ), a flat 40% subsidy extended up to a 3-kW rooftop solar PV system, the distribution of consumers based on energy consumption ( Figs 10 and 11 ) and the energy gap for the star label by solar power ( Tables 1 and 7 ) of a 3-kW rooftop solar PV are considered for the case study. Eighty to 90% of the houses could achieve a five-star label by employing a 3-kW rooftop solar PV. The distribution of star labels for 2017–18 and 2018–19 for the buildings as per consumption is shown in Figs 12 and 13 , respectively.

Financial parameters considered for the viability of a solar PV rooftop system

Parameter DescriptionSource
Electricity escalation rate15%[ ]
Inflation rate5%[ ]
Discount rate9.36%[ ]
Project life 25 years[ ]
Debt ratio70:30[ ]
Debt interest ratio11%[ ]
Debt terms10 years[ ]
Parameter DescriptionSource
Electricity escalation rate15%[ ]
Inflation rate5%[ ]
Discount rate9.36%[ ]
Project life 25 years[ ]
Debt ratio70:30[ ]
Debt interest ratio11%[ ]
Debt terms10 years[ ]

Distribution of star buildings employing rooftop solar PV systems (2017–18)

Distribution of star buildings employing rooftop solar PV systems (2017–18)

Distribution of star buildings employing rooftop solar PV systems (2018–19)

Distribution of star buildings employing rooftop solar PV systems (2018–19)

Low and moderate energy consumers ( Table 4 ) could achieve a high five-star label by employing a rooftop solar PV system whereas high energy consumers could achieve an additional two-star label by this measure.

The economic viability of a rooftop solar PV system for the buildings under consideration was also ascertained by using RETScreen. The net present value (NPV) based on discounted cash flow was used as an analysis approach using the RETScreen cost and finance module. The analysis period was assumed to be 25 years based on the useful life and warranty period of solar PV panels. Financial parameters used in the RETScreen finance module for ascertaining the economic viability of the two scenarios are given in Table 7 and the simulation results obtained are tabulated in Table 8 .

Economics of a 3-kW rooftop solar PV system at the study site

Rooftop solar PV (rating)Simple payback periodNPV with 4% annual escalation of electricity tariff (Rs)
3 kW6.5 years140 000
Rooftop solar PV (rating)Simple payback periodNPV with 4% annual escalation of electricity tariff (Rs)
3 kW6.5 years140 000

To explore rooftop solar PV systems for other climatic zones, an exercise akin to that undertaken in Delhi was carried out for other cities of India, which are tabulated in Table 9 . RETScreen simulation results for these cities are tabulated in Table 10 .

Electricity tariff and solar-radiation availability in Indian cities

City Coordinates (latitude (°)/longitude (°))Daily solar radiation horizontal (kWh/m / day)Electricity tariff for consumption for >400 kWh/month (Rs/kWh) [ ]
Mumbai19.1/72.95.127.51
Chennai 12.8/80.15.376.10
Kolkata22.5/88.34.868.92
Bengaluru13/77.65.327.80
Hyderabad17.5/78.55.009.00
Ahmedabad23.1/72.65.505.20
Pune 18.5/73.85.5211.54
City Coordinates (latitude (°)/longitude (°))Daily solar radiation horizontal (kWh/m / day)Electricity tariff for consumption for >400 kWh/month (Rs/kWh) [ ]
Mumbai19.1/72.95.127.51
Chennai 12.8/80.15.376.10
Kolkata22.5/88.34.868.92
Bengaluru13/77.65.327.80
Hyderabad17.5/78.55.009.00
Ahmedabad23.1/72.65.505.20
Pune 18.5/73.85.5211.54

RETScreen simulation of 3-kWp solar rooftop PV systems for selected cities of India

City Annual energy generation (kWh)Simple payback period (years)NPV with 4% annual escalation of electricity tariff (Rs)
Mumbai42743.5375 956
Chennai 43307.390 872
Kolkata40826.5124 625
Bengaluru43345.2200 711
Hyderabad41274.6242 970
Ahmedabad46469.2–12 174
Pune 46143432 126
City Annual energy generation (kWh)Simple payback period (years)NPV with 4% annual escalation of electricity tariff (Rs)
Mumbai42743.5375 956
Chennai 43307.390 872
Kolkata40826.5124 625
Bengaluru43345.2200 711
Hyderabad41274.6242 970
Ahmedabad46469.2–12 174
Pune 46143432 126

Rooftop grid-integrated 3-kW p solar PV systems can bridge a building’s existing energy gap for the five-star label. The study indicates that a grid-connected 3-kWp solar PV system is suitable for rooftop residential installation in most Indian cities and this retrofit improves the EPI of a building and thus provides two additional energy stars to the building. The payback period of grid-connected rooftop solar PV systems varies from 3 to 7 years. However, the payback period varies widely for different Indian cities; for Pune and Ahmedabad, despite having the same annual solar radiation, the payback period is 3 and 9 years, respectively. This is primarily due to different residential electricity tariff rates in the states of India and it is the most important factor to affect the finances of rooftop solar PV systems. Therefore, rooftop solar PV systems are not recommended as an instrument for achieving a higher star label for the states like Gujarat where the residential electricity tariff is low. The installation of a 3-kWp grid-integrated rooftop solar PV by low and moderate energy consumers is sufficient for achieving the five-star energy label for the building whereas high and very high energy consumers need to take additional measures for getting five-star energy labels for their buildings. The reduction in energy purchases from the grid increases the saving of energy for end consumers and thus reduces emissions because grid electricity in India is predominately coal-based. This study can be further extended for the normalization of rooftop solar PV subsidies for different states so that this energy substitution can match the grid parity in respective Indian states. Further passive retrofit measures, which include improvement in the envelopes of existing residential buildings and active retrofit measures, such as the installation of grid-integrated rooftop solar PV systems, can be optimized for a building based on life-cycle costing so that the cost of energy stars is minimized.

Study is not funded by any agency/organization. Data gathered by self for the study undertaken. Other sources cited as applicable.

None declared.

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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Urban lots are not for the faint of heart, especially when surrounded by existing dwellings that predate zoning codes. Such…

RURAL / SECOND HOMES

residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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ON THE BOARDS

residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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Humans have a primal desire to live by the water, even if it means assuming some hardships to do so.…

Custom Doors Open Incredible Possibilities

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

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residential green building case study in india

Sponsored Case Study: Echo Hills Residence by Robert Gurney

Architect Robert Gurney leverages a site’s steeply sloped terrain to transform a suburban Maryland home into a tranquil oasis that takes its cues from nature.

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Green building: case study

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residential green building case study in india

SYED M A Q B O O L GEELANI

Building materials and technologies, and building practices have evolved through ages. The following points require attention, regarding the use of modern building materials: energy consumed in the manufacturing processes, problems of long distance transportation, natural resources and raw materials consumed, recycling and safe disposal, impact on environment, and long-term sustainability. Thus the issues related to energy expenditure, recycling, biodegradable, environmental and sustainability with respect to future demand need to be addressed during the manufacture and use of any new building material by the practice of increasing the efficiency with which buildings use resources energy, water, and materials while reducing building impacts on human health and the environment, through better site, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and removal i.e. the complete building life cycle for achieving sustainable building development or green building development. The goal of the "green building" project is to reduce the impact of construction on the environment by sustainable building and construction of buildings using methods and materials that are resource efficient and will not compromise the health of the environment or the associated health and well-being of the building's occupants, construction workers, the general public, or future generations. Sustainable building involves the consideration of many issues, including land use, site impacts, indoor environment, energy and water use, solid waste, and lifecycle impacts of building materials. Energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions will therefore continue to rise unless actions to direct the construction industry towards sustainable consumption and production are taken urgently.

Jasir Mushtaq

Today we all have heard the term " Green Building " more and more often just because the Green Movement is getting more and more popular with each passing year. A green building is the one which uses less water, optimises energy efficiency, conserves natural resources, generates less waste and provides healthier spaces for occupants, as compared to a conventional building. The " built " environment has a vast impact on the natural environment, human health, and the economy. By adopting green building strategies, we can maximize both economic and environmental performance. Green construction methods can be integrated into buildings at any stage, from design and construction, to renovation and deconstruction. In the year 2001, the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC), formed by Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) is continuously striving towards wider adoption of green building concepts in our country. It has licensed the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Standard from the U.S. Green Building Council and at present certifies the LEED-New Construction and LEED-Core and Shell buildings in India. The Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) was launched by the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) as a guide for energy efficiency standards. The Green Building movement spearheaded by CII-Sohrabji Godrej Green Business Centre in Hyderabad since 2001 has come a long way. With a meagre green building footprint of 20,000 sq.ft in 2003, today over 400 million sq.ft have been rated by IGBC. India ranks third among the top ten countries for LEED and in 2016, nearly 650 projects in India earned LEED certification. According to a recent USGBC survey, 87 percent of Indian professionals anticipate that use of LEED in India increasing overall, with nine out of ten industry senior executives in India anticipating that their LEED related work will increase over the next several years. The effective use of the natural resources is the need of present days. The Indian green building movement is surging ahead and well poised to reach greater heights, in the years to come.

Dr Satya Mandal

Green building rating systems (GBRS) result in energy-efficient and environment-friendly buildings. They not only preventpollution and resource wastage during construction ; but also uphold high indoor air quality, energy and water efficiencies throughout the building life-cycle. The economic growth of Indian cities has led to hasty construction activities causing resource challenges, air pollution and congestion. The aim of the paper is to find the greenest building in the National Capital Region (NCR) ,which can be a benchmark building for the new buildings in the region. The paper presents the case study of two greenest buildings in the NCR from the two different GBRS; and also compare their attributes and rating systems. The paper inferscritical energy efficiency, air quality and water efficiency attributes of these benchmark buildings much needed in rapidly growing cities like NCR.

pankaj saini

The concept of green building has created an immense importance in a developing country like INDIA. The theory implies of minimizing the wastage and the cost of construction. Green Building encompasses a wide range of design practices, building systems integration, product specification, and construction techniques Green building approach is consistent with the mission of most affordable housing developers, and the most community development corporation mission statements which include language about ensuring that low income people have access to safe, decent and affordable housing. The concept of green buildings is not as emerging as we think it is. The Evolution of housing started by utilizing nature and natural resources like trees and caves as shelter from the severity of natural elements like sun, rain, wind, etc. Based on such complex experiences, our Vedic philosophy evolved certain methods to maximize the use of Panch Mahabhuta or the 5 basic elements of nature, i.e., Jal (w...

IOSR Journals

Change in climate, caused by the release of greenhouse effect causing gases (primarily carbon dioxide) into the atmosphere, has been recognized as one of the greatest threats of the 21st century. Share of the global energy consumption in India and China has also been on the rise due to heavy industrialization, urbanization, population explosion, and intensive growth of IT. Buildings are the prime energy consumers in modern cities accounting upto 40 to 45% energy consumption. Their consumption can be largely confined through improving efficiency, which is an effective means to lessen greenhouse gas emissions and slow down depletion of fossil fuels. There is a heavy (over 50%) saving potential in the building sector and thus it is considered as a potential sector to meet the challenges of global energy demand and climate change. Along with the advent of energy efficient measures, more effective means are needed to induce or compel greater efforts, especially to the signatories of the Kyoto Protocol. This technical paper highlights the importance of sustainable construction, discusses role of energy efficiency in green buildings in Indian context to reduce the energy consumption and environmental degradation through Green House Gas emission (GHG). Also it points out to the benefits of green construction as well as the incentives from govt. and municipal bodies for GRIHA certified green building.

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology

Mohammed Arif

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to identify the characteristics of green building guidelines in developed countries and to analyze their influence on the evolution and adoption of similar guidelines in India.Design/methodology/approachThis research reviews the green building guidelines in the developed as well as the developing countries such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design guidelines for new construction (LEED® NC‐USA), Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM)‐UK, Comprehensive Assessment System for Building Environmental Efficiency (CASBEE)‐Japan, and LEED®‐India and further performs a comparative analysis of these guidelines.FindingsBased on the comparative analysis of LEED® NC‐USA, BREEAM‐UK, and CASBEE‐Japan, the characteristics that might have affected their current acceptance were identified. The catalysts and hindrances associated with the acceptance of LEED‐India in India were identified based on the comparative analysis ...

IAEME Publication

Environmental pollution has reached a stage wherein it cannot be left alone to the natural environment to heal by itself. Human interventions have become absolutely necessary to control environmental pollution and reduce the impact of damage to the environment. One large contributor to environmental pollution is the construction industry. The improper use of natural resources in construction on buildings, the energy consumed and the dispose of the salvage largely impacts the environment. There is a huge concern to reduce the impact of buildings on the environment. This concerns for the environment have in fact led to the thought process of construction of green buildings which minimize the impact of the buildings on the environment. In order to minimize the environmental impact of the buildings it is high time to follow guidelines and necessary steps for undertaking the task of construction of green buildings. The researchers in this paper talks about the requirement of green building constructions in India, and tries to find out the drivers which create a demand for purchase of green buildings.

KULDEEP KAUSHIK

IJERA Journal

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  1. 10 Most inspirational Green buildings in India

    The ITC green center was the first corporate building in India to be certified LEED platinum in 2004, and it was the biggest platinum-rated green building with a floor area of 170,000 square feet. Green material like Fly-ash based concrete and Glass with 19% recycled content was used for building the majority of the façade. 10% of the total ...

  2. Green Building in India with Case Study

    Green Building in India with Case Study. Sep 12, 2021 • Download as PPTX, PDF •. 5 likes • 10,891 views. A. AjayashKekan. The presentation comes with definitions, uses, advantages, etc. Including the case study of Green Building in India & References in the end are also provided. Read more. 1 of 28. Download now.

  3. Case Study III : TZED homes in Bangalore by BCIL

    A project developed by BCIL as a residential project consisting of environmentally sustainable and aesthetic homes for 95 families. A benchmark in SBE development in India. TZED (ZED stands for Zero Energy Development) is located at airport Whitefield Road, Bangalore. This five-acre site comprises of 95 homes built on the principles of ...

  4. 15 GRIHA certified buildings in India

    The Coal India Limited Office Building is located in Kolkata with 25159 sqm by Raj Rewal Associates & Urban Design Consultants. The project was completed in 2014 with a 4-star GRIHA rating. The energy Consumption is claimed to have been 37.9% less than the GRIHA benchmarks.

  5. Indira Paryavaran Bhawan Case Study

    44 kWh/m 2 /yr. Introduction. Indira Paryavaran Bhawan, the new office building for Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) sets is a radical change from a conventional building design. The project team put special emphasis on strategies for reducing energy demand by providing adequate natural light, shading, landscape to reduce ambient ...

  6. PDF Griha Habitats

    energy savings due to green- building construction. I am pleased to see that GRIHA is adding momentum to the green-ness of upcoming and existing buildings across the country to create sustainable tomorrow. I congratulate the colleagues in the GRIHA Council for the compilation of case studies for GRIHA rated projects in the Southern region.

  7. PDF Green and Resilient Development: A case study of ZED Homes in Bangalore

    reen and Resilient Development: A case study of ZED Homes in BangaloreThe objective of documenting this initiative is to create a better understanding of how sustainable housing development can lay the foundation for city resil. and climate change driven shocks.MARCH- 2015Prepared byUnderContextThere is an increasing recognition amongst urban.

  8. Green buildings: India's sustainable development strategy

    A case study here is the National Building Code of India that has been updated to include provisions for green building construction. When India embarked on the Smart Cities Mission in 2015, striving to establish 100 smart cities across the country, the vision was clear to prioritize sustainable urbanization.

  9. Analysis On Green Building (Case Study: GRIET, Hyderabad, India)

    2 Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Gokaraju Rangaraju Institute of Engineering and. Technology (Autonomous), Hyderabad - 500090. Email: [email protected] Ph no ...

  10. 10 of India's most sustainable buildings

    3. Suzlon One Earth, Pune. It is a world-leading company, in wind energy resources, which pledged to create a better work environment. It has been an epitome of green offices in India. The energy efficiency achieved is 92% and there is no building that has reached such potential.

  11. PDF Green Buildings for Better Future-A Case Study

    this paper different Green Buildings of India has been compared at different levels and their capacity has been measured to implement the ... residential home, the materials used have embodied emissions equal to 15 years of operational emissions includes emissions ... Green Buildings for Better Future-A Case Study 39 Journal of Civil ...

  12. PDF Green building: case study

    Green building: case study ii Figures Figure 1: Future trends in the building sector in India 27 Figure 2: Breakdown of employment in the building, construction and real-estate sector in India in 2011 29 Figure 3: Energy consumption distribution in residential buildings 33 Figure 4: Energy consumption distribution in commercial buildings 33

  13. Case Studies of Green Construction and Sustainable Architecture in India

    Green buildings have to undergo a set of audits and get certification to be considered as sustainable architecture in India. Mili Majumdar from Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) stated that the overall performance of the building is the most important criteria for certification. Unless this performance is measured in specific units, we ...

  14. Case Study Library

    Welcome to World Green Building Council's Case Study Library. Here you can find examples of the world's most cutting edge sustainable buildings. Each case study demonstrates outstanding performance of an operational building that complies with at least one of WorldGBC's three strategic impact areas: Climate Action; Health, Equity ...

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    1. Traditional Indian Architecture 2. Bamboo Guest House Extension - Kolkata 3. Institute of Rural Research and Development - Gurgaon 4. The Energy and Research Institute, University - Delhi 5. CII Shobraj Godrej Green Business Centre - Hyderabad 6. IIT Green Centre - Gurgaon 7. Centre for Environment Education - Ahmedabad - by Anup Kumar Prasad

  16. Case Studies & Resources

    Share options Building Policy Methodology for RETV Formula Development for ENS 2018 Document type: Research paper December 2018 Eco-Niwas Samhita 2018 (ENS) is the new Energy Conservation Building Code for Residential Buildings (ECBC-R). Among different code provisions, a maximum Residential Envelope Transmittance Value (RETV) is defined for cooling dominated climates. RETV gives a quantitative

  17. Bridging the energy gap of India's residential buildings by using

    The present work is a study on the star labelling of residential buildings in India that investigates the residential-building energy consumption and existing gap for star labelling promulgated by the BEE. This study also aims to estimate the overall impact of rooftop solar PV system application in a hot-dry climate in achieving a higher star ...

  18. PDF Green Buildings in India

    Green Building Council's effort to provide a national standard for what constitutes a "green building." LEED-India programme has been adapted from United States Green Building Council's (USGBC) in 2007. An initiative undertaken by the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) in India, it has set up the LEED 2011 for India Core Committee

  19. PDF CASE STUDY Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment—A green

    CASE STUDY Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment—A green- ... European Union (7.52%), and India (7.08%). Moreover, residential buildings are the top contributors among buildings (Figure 2)(WRI, 2020). ... and initiatives for boosting India's green-building efforts in the built environment, which constitute a ...

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    Title:Hospital, Medical & Nursing College, Ayush and Auditorium Buildings at AIIMS, Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh

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    Case Study: Tribeca Penthouse by Min Design. The penthouse apartment in the converted 1874 warehouse in New York had soaring ceiling heights, an abundance of daylight, and…. S. Claire ConroyMay 7, 2024. ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS, CASE STUDIES, URBANFebruary 21, 2024. Case Study: Two Gables by Wheeler Kearns.

  22. (PDF) Green building: case study

    The CAGR in production has been Green building: case study 29 fparticularly high (9.2%) during the 11th FYP period (2007-2012) reflecting robust demand from the construction sector and high exports. Cement production increased by 56% to 228.3 megatonnes (Mt) between 2000-2001 and 2010-2011.

  23. PDF Case Studies on Green Institutional Buildings in India

    Keywords-case studies, green building, GRIHA rating-----Date of Submission: 01-09-2022 Date of Acceptance: 12-09-2022 ----- I. INTRODUCTION Detailed green building case studies serve as an important education tool for students and practitioners, and allow for future project planning, and data collection ahead of time.