Rontar

20 Fresh Ways to Write “Please Find Attached”

Alex Velikiy

In today’s fast-paced digital landscape, the way we attach and refer to documents in our communications has evolved significantly. From choosing the right words to replace “Please find attached,” to understanding the nuances of file attachment etiquette, this article provides you with essential insights and alternatives. Whether you’re communicating with colleagues, clients, or superiors, these tips will help you convey your messages more effectively and professionally.

Why “Please Find Attached” No Longer Works

The phrase “Please find attached” has seen its day. In modern professional communication, it’s become somewhat outdated and overly formal. The digital era demands clearer, more direct forms of expression. Moreover, this phrase can sound detached, as if throwing the attachment over a wall rather than smoothly integrating it into the conversation. With the rise of less formal, more conversational email and messaging styles, it’s time to find alternatives that better fit today’s pacing and digital work environment.

Please Find Attached vs Please Find Enclosed

In distinguishing between “Please find attached” and “Please find enclosed,” it’s vital to understand the contexts in which each phrase evolved and is typically used. While “Please find attached” is a relic of the digital communication age, heralding the inclusion of an attachment in an email, “Please find enclosed” dates back further, to a time of physical correspondence, indicating documents enclosed within a letter or package. Each serves a similar function—alerting the recipient to additional content—but their usage is distinctly tied to the medium of communication.

20 Alternatives to Please Find Attached

Exploring less formal, yet professional alternatives to “please find attached” can refresh your email communications. Here are twenty options:

  • I’ve attached…
  • Attached is…
  • Please see the attached…
  • Attached you will find…
  • I have included…
  • Please refer to the attached…
  • The attached file includes…
  • For your review, I’ve attached…
  • Attached for your consideration…
  • See the attached file for…
  • For your convenience, I’ve attached…
  • I am sharing [file name] with you…
  • Find attached…
  • Attached please find…
  • Please check the attached…
  • I have attached [file name] for your review…
  • Enclosed please find…
  • For your immediate attention, please find attached…
  • You will find [file name] attached…

1. I’ve attached…

This alternative is direct and friendly, making it suitable for emails to colleagues or clients you have an established relationship with. It removes the formality without losing professionalism. This phrase is particularly effective when you want to draw attention to the attachment in a casual, yet professional manner.

2. Attached is…

“Attached is…” serves as a straightforward and effective introduction to the contents of your attachment. It’s especially useful when the email’s primary purpose is to deliver the attachment. This phrase is perfect when you want the recipient to focus on the documents or information being sent.

3. Enclosed…

While “enclosed” is traditionally used for physical mail, it can be a synonym for “attached” in email communications, offering a slightly more formal tone than “attached.” This term is best suited for communications that mimic the formality of a letter, such as legal or official documents.

4. Please see the attached…

This phrase adds a polite request to the recipient, encouraging them to view the attachment. It’s a versatile option that works well in both formal and informal emails. Use it when you want to ensure the recipient notices and opens the attachment.

5. Attached you will find…

This alternative sets the expectation that the recipient will find something specific in the attachment. It’s useful for when you need to direct the recipient’s attention to detailed information or documents. This phrase is especially effective in professional settings where clarity is paramount.

6. I have included…

“I have included…” implies that the email comes with something extra, making it a great way to introduce attachments that provide additional information or context. This phrase is best when the attachment complements the email content rather than being the main focus.

7. Please refer to the attached…

This phrase is a polite way to draw the recipient’s attention to the attachment for more detailed information. It’s ideal for instances where the attachment is an essential part of the communication, such as a report, a form, or detailed instructions.

8. The attached file includes…

Starting with “The attached file includes…” is an effective way to summarize the contents of the attachment. This introduction is particularly useful when sending documents that contain data, research findings, or comprehensive reports. It sets the stage for what the recipient can expect before opening the file.

9. For your review, I’ve attached…

This phrase is courteous and implies that the attachment requires the recipient’s attention or action. It’s suitable for when you’re sending documents that need approval, feedback, or any form of review. This approach helps in highlighting the importance of the attachment.

10. Attached for your consideration…

“Attached for your consideration…” is an elegant way to present documents that require a decision or evaluation. This phrase is perfect for proposals, applications, or any situation where you’re seeking approval or agreement from the recipient. It suggests a level of respect for the recipient’s judgment and decision-making process.

11. See the attached file for…

This alternative explicitly directs the recipient’s attention to the attachment for specific information. It’s a great choice when you want to ensure the recipient knows where to find the details they need. Use this phrase when the attachment holds key information that supports or elaborates on your email’s message.

12. For your convenience, I’ve attached…

“For your convenience, I’ve attached…” highlights the sender’s consideration for the recipient’s needs. It suggests that the attachment is meant to make the recipient’s life easier, whether by providing necessary information or by simplifying a task. This phrase is ideal for when you are sending something that saves the recipient time or effort.

13. I am sharing [file name] with you…

This phrase is particularly personal and direct, making it suitable for collaborative environments. It invites the recipient to view the attachment as a shared resource. Use it when the attachment is part of a collaborative effort or when you want to emphasize the partnership aspect of your relationship.

14. Find attached…

“Find attached…” is a concise way to introduce an attachment without any frills. It works well in situations where the email’s main purpose is to convey the attachment. This phrase is suitable for internal communications where brevity is appreciated.

15. Attached please find…

This phrase is a more formal version of “I’ve attached…” and is suitable for professional and respectful contexts. It works well when you want to maintain a formal tone while ensuring the attachment is noted. Use it in communications with new clients, senior management, or external partners.

16. Please check the attached…

“Please check the attached…” is a polite request that encourages the recipient to look at the attachment. It’s suitable for when the attachment contains information that needs verification, confirmation, or any form of action. This phrase is particularly useful in collaborative projects or tasks.

17. I have attached [file name] for your review…

This phrase specifies the attachment by name, making it easy for the recipient to know what to look for. It’s particularly effective when sending important documents that require attention or action, such as reports, contracts, or proposals. Naming the file in the email also helps in ensuring that the right document is being discussed and reviewed.

18. Enclosed please find…

This is another formal alternative, similar to “enclosed…” but with an added polite request. It’s suitable for formal communications where you want to convey respect and professionalism. Use it when sending documents of a formal nature, like legal documents or formal reports.

19. For your immediate attention, please find attached…

This phrase emphasizes the urgency or importance of the attachment. It’s suitable for situations where immediate action or response is needed. Use this when you need to convey the critical nature of the attachment, such as deadlines, urgent requests, or important announcements.

20. You will find [file name] attached…

Specifying the file by name and stating that it is attached is a clear and direct approach. This method is effective for ensuring clarity and reducing the risk of the attachment being overlooked. Use this phrase when it’s crucial that the recipient acknowledges and opens the specific attachment you’re sending.

The Proper Etiquette While Attaching Files

When attaching files to emails, observing proper etiquette ensures clear communication and shows professionalism. Here are key points to consider.

Don’t Forget the Attachment

Forgetting to attach a file can delay processes and cause unnecessary back-and-forth communication. Always double-check before sending an email to ensure the attachment is included. Tools and email extensions that remind you to attach files can be extremely helpful in avoiding this common mistake.

Bring Attention to the Attachment

Make it clear in your email that there is an attachment. Mention the attachment explicitly within the body of your email to ensure the recipient knows to look for it. This practice helps prevent the attachment from being overlooked.

Give an Apt File Name

Use descriptive and specific file names for your attachments. A well-chosen file name informs the recipient about the content without needing to open it and makes it easier to search for later. Avoid vague names like “Document1.pdf” in favor of more informative titles such as “2023_Project_Proposal.pdf.”

Add a Good Email Subject Line

The subject line of your email sets the expectation for the recipient. When an email includes an important attachment, ensure the subject line reflects its presence or importance. For example, “Project Proposal Attached – Feedback Needed by Friday” directly informs the recipient of both the attachment and a related action or deadline.

Final Thoughts

Adapting to the contemporary norms of digital communication is crucial in maintaining professionalism and clarity in our emails. By moving away from outdated phrases like “Please find attached” and observing proper attachment etiquette, we not only smooth out our interactions but also contribute to more effective and efficient communication.

Remember, the details, such as mentioning the attachment within the email, providing a descriptive file name, and crafting a specific subject line, can significantly impact the recipient’s experience and ease of understanding. Embracing these changes and suggestions will ensure your emails are well-received and your communications are as clear and effective as possible. Let these guidelines help you stand out for all the right reasons in your professional correspondences.

Alex Velikiy

CMO of Rontar. I’m interested in entrepreneurship, sales and marketing. As part of my day-to-day routine I do everything from creating marketing strategy to starting advertising campaigns. Sometimes I write for our marketing blog. When not at work, I do sports, lead a healthy lifestyle and keep up on everything that is connected with this.

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15 Professional Ways to say 'Please Find Attached' Via Email

Adding documents to emails is a common practice in both personal and professional settings. Whether it's a resume, a report, or a photo, attachments are often a crucial part of the message being sent. Being clear and careful when adding documents to emails is essential to avoid misunderstandings.

"Please find attached" is a simple yet effective phrase that signals to the recipient that an important document is included with the email. However, there are more professional and effective alternatives you can say when you need to add an attachment to an email.

Knowing how to properly say "please find attached" can make the process smoother, help you appear more professional, and ensure that your attachments don't go unnoticed .

In this article, we'll cover the meaning of "please find attached", when you should say it, different ways to say it, and provide 15 templates you can use to get started today.

"Please Find Attached" Meaning

"Please find attached" is a phrase commonly used in emails to let the recipient know that an attachment is included with the email. It's a polite way of drawing attention to the additional files you've sent. The phrase is often placed before or after the main body of the email, usually near the end, to make sure the recipient doesn't overlook the attachment.

"Please find attached" is a common phrase used in emails to alert the recipient that an important document is included, ensuring it doesn't go overlooked .

The phrase is formal and widely accepted in professional settings. It's like the digital equivalent of handing someone a document in a meeting while saying, "Here you go." It's straightforward and gets the job done, but there are other ways to say it, which we'll explore later.

The phrase is not just about politeness; it's also about clarity. When you say "please find attached," you're making it clear that there's something extra that the recipient should look at . This helps avoid any confusion and ensures that the attachment doesn't go unnoticed.

When to Say "Please Find Attached"

Understanding the different scenarios where "please find attached" is appropriate is crucial for effective email communication. Knowing when to use this phrase helps you set the right tone and ensures that your attachments are given the attention they deserve.

Here are a few common times when you should say "please find attached":

Sending Work Documents

If you're emailing work-related documents like reports, proposals, or invoices, it's a good idea to use "please find attached." This makes it clear that you've included something important that needs the recipient's attention.

Job Applications

When applying for a job, you'll often need to send your resume and cover letter via email. Using "please find attached" ensures that the hiring manager knows to look for these crucial documents.

Sharing Resources

If you're sending resources like articles, guides, or how-to manuals, "please find attached" can be a helpful phrase. It signals that you're providing additional information that the recipient may find useful.

When to NOT Say "Please Find Attached"

Just as it's important to know when to use "please find attached," it's equally crucial to understand when not to use this phrase. Being aware of these situations can help you communicate more effectively and avoid potential confusion or misunderstandings.

Here are common scenarios in which you shouldn't say "please find attached":

No Attachments Included

The most obvious scenario where you shouldn't use "please find attached" is when there are no attachments included in the email. Saying so would confuse the recipient and make you appear careless.

Informal Communication

In casual or informal emails, especially with friends or family, the phrase might come off as overly formal. A simple "I've sent you the file" or "Check out the picture I sent" would be more fitting.

When the Email IS the Message

If the main point of your email is contained within the email body itself and doesn't require additional documents for context or clarification, then there's no need to use "please find attached." In such cases, the phrase would be irrelevant and could confuse the recipient.

Multiple Attachments with Different Purposes

If you're sending multiple attachments that serve different purposes, it might be better to specify what each attachment is rather than using a generic "please find attached." This provides clarity and ensures that each attachment gets the attention it deserves.

Different Ways to Say "Please Find Attached"

While "please find attached" is a classic and widely accepted phrase, it's not the only way to indicate you've attached something to an email.

Here are different ways to say "please find attached":

  • Attached is...
  • I've attached...
  • Enclosed, please find...
  • Kindly find attached...
  • Please see attached...
  • Please see the attached file for...
  • I'm attaching...
  • Attached for your review...
  • Attached for your convenience...
  • Please check the attached...
  • Attached as requested...
  • I have included...
  • Included is...
  • Find the attached...
  • Please review the attached...
  • Attached you will find...
  • I've included for your review...
  • Please note the attached...
  • Attached, you'll see...

Is "Please See Attached" Better to Say?

The phrase "Please see attached" is another commonly used alternative to "Please find attached." It's a bit less formal but still clear and professional . Some people prefer this phrase because it's more direct and modern, cutting down on what might be seen as unnecessary formality.

However, whether it's "better" to say largely depends on the context and the relationship you have with the recipient. In a more formal setting, or when communicating with someone for the first time, "Please find attached" might be the safer bet. It's a phrase that has been used for years and is universally understood.

If the email conversation is more casual or if you have an established relationship with the recipient, "Please see attached" can work just as well.

Ultimately, both phrases serve the same purpose: they alert the recipient to an attachment. The choice between the two comes down to the tone you want to set. If you're aiming for a more traditional, formal tone, "Please find attached" fits the bill. If you're going for a slightly more relaxed but still professional tone, "Please see attached" is a good option.

How to Professionally Say "Please See Attached Documents"

Saying "please find attached" in a professional manner is more than just a courtesy; it's an integral part of effective communication. When you use this phrase professionally, you're not only being polite but also ensuring that your message is clear and your attachments don't go unnoticed.

Here are some tips to keep in mind:

Place the phrase near the end of the email to ensure it's not overlooked.

Make sure the attachment is relevant to the email's subject and content.

If the email has multiple attachments, specify what each one is .

Use a formal tone if the email is for professional purposes.

Most important: always double-check to ensure you've actually attached the file .

Check out our article 5 Email Templates for Sending Documents for more tips about including documents in emails!

15 Email Templates to Help You Say "Please Find Attached"

Having a set of ready-to-use templates can be a real time-saver when you're sending emails that include attachments. These templates help you get straight to the point, ensuring that your recipient knows to look for the attached document.

They also add a layer of professionalism to your emails, making you appear more organized and thoughtful. Whether you're sending a report to a colleague or a resume to a potential employer, these templates offer a quick and effective way to say "please find attached," leaving no room for confusion.

Note that each template uses a different method of saying "please find attached."

Copy templates to use them anywhere:

How to Automate Common Email Phrases

To automate common phrases in your emails, give Text Blaze a try. Text Blaze helps you create quick text templates that you can insert anywhere you work using keyboard shortcuts.

With Text Blaze, you can create templates for common email phrases , such as "please find attached," email signatures, and other common work emails .

Not only that, but Text Blaze helps you personalize your emails using fill-in-the-blank placeholders that help you automate your email without losing your personal touch. Using Text Blaze, you can automate repetitive typing, save time, and boost your email productivity with ease!

Text Blaze is free forever , which means you can use it to save time forever without needing to pay for a subscription.

Communicate Effectively Via Email With "Please Find Attached"

Knowing how to properly say "please find attached" in emails is a simple but important part of email etiquette. It ensures that your recipient knows to look for an attachment and what that attachment is. Whether you stick with the classic "please find attached" or opt for one of the many alternatives, the key is to be clear and professional.

Use Text Blaze to automate repetitive typing, create useful email templates, and boost productivity today!

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10 Other Ways to Say “Please See Attached” in Email (With Examples)

As a professional writer, I often find myself attaching documents to emails. However, I’ve noticed that repeatedly using the phrase “Please see attached” can become monotonous and potentially less effective. This realization led me to explore alternative ways to direct recipients’ attention to email attachments .

In this blog post, I’ll share several varied expressions to replace the ubiquitous “Please see attached” in your emails. I’ll provide usage examples for each alternative, demonstrating how these phrases can be seamlessly incorporated into your professional communication.

What to Say Instead of “Please See Attached” in Email

Here are ten alternative ways to say ” please see attached” in email:

  • I have attached [document name] for your review.
  • Please find the attached [document name].
  • The [document name] is attached for your reference.
  • You will find [document name] attached.
  • Please refer to the attached [document name].
  • See the attached [document name] for more details.
  • For your convenience, I’ve attached [document name].
  • Kindly check the attached [document name].
  • Enclosed is the [document name] for your perusal.
  • Please consult the attachment for further information.

1.  I have attached [document name] for your review.

“I have attached [document name] for your review” is a formal and clear way to indicate that an attachment is included for the recipient to examine.

This phrase is particularly useful in professional settings where you expect the recipient to provide feedback or follow up on the content.

It sets a specific expectation and respects the recipient’s input by implying their review is important.

Usage examples:

  • In a business email regarding a proposal, you might say, “Please see the proposal document; I have attached it for your review .”
  • When sending a draft report to a colleague, “Here is the first draft of our annual report; I have attached it for your review .”

2. Please find the attached [document name].

“Please find the attached [document name]” is a courteous and commonly used expression that directs the recipient to the attached document without assuming prior awareness.

It’s suitable for both formal and informal emails, providing polite instruction that is universally understood.

  • In a client communication, “Regarding your request, please find the attached file outlining the details.”
  • When sending important documents for a meeting, “ Please find the attached agenda for tomorrow’s session.”

3.  The [document name] is attached for your reference.

“The [document name] is attached for your reference” suggests that the document is provided as a helpful resource rather than requiring immediate action.

This phrase is perfect for contexts where you are providing information that supports a discussion or decision but does not necessitate direct feedback.

  • For a colleague using historical data in a project, “For background information, the report is attached for your reference .”
  • When sending a guideline document, “Ensure to follow the protocols outlined in the guidelines; the document is attached for your reference .”

4.  You will find [document name] Attached .

“Attached, you will find [document name]” is a straightforward and efficient way to alert the recipient about the attachment.

This phrase focuses on what the recipient can expect to find, using a passive construction that is particularly suitable for formal communications.

  • In an email to a group of stakeholders, “ You will find the completed risk assessment attached.”
  • When providing supplementary material during a course, “For further reading on this topic , you will find several helpful articles attached .”

5. Please refer to the attached [document name].

“Please refer to the attached [document name]” is a directive phrase that not only informs about the attachment but also encourages the recipient to use it as a reference for specific information or actions.

It’s useful when the attached document contains essential details that the recipient needs to understand or act upon.

  • In project management communications, “To view the updated project timeline, please refer to the attached schedule.”
  • When sending technical specifications, “For installation procedures, please refer to the attached instruction manual.”

6. See the attached [document name] for more details.

“See the attached [document name] for more details” is a directive that serves to point the recipient toward the attachment for additional, specific information related to the main message of the email.

It’s effective in instances where the email body contains a summary or introduction, and the attachment provides in-depth data or explanations.

This phrase helps to keep the email concise while ensuring all necessary details are accessible.

  • In a sales proposal email, “For a breakdown of pricing and packages, see the attached proposal for more details.”
  • When providing a detailed report to a supervisor, “For a comprehensive analysis of our quarterly performance, see the attached report for more details.”

7.  For your convenience, I’ve attached [document name].

“For your convenience, I’ve attached [document name]” is a thoughtful phrase that emphasizes the ease and helpfulness of the attachment to the recipient.

It suggests that the inclusion of the attachment is meant to make the recipient’s task easier, often used when providing forms, guidelines, or other resources that assist in completing a task or making a decision.

  • In an email to new hires, “To help you get started with your onboarding process, for your convenience, I’ve attached the necessary forms.”
  • When sending a manual to a customer, “To assist you with setup, for your convenience, I’ve attached the user manual.”

8.  Kindly check the attached [document name].

“Kindly check the attached [document name]” is a polite request that encourages the recipient to look at the attached document.

It’s often used when the sender needs the recipient to verify information, give feedback, or take specific action based on the contents of the attachment.

This phrase is courteous yet carries an expectation of a response or action.

  • In a collaborative project, “To ensure all details are correct before our presentation, kindly check the attached slides.”
  • When seeking approval for a document, “ Kindly check the attached draft and provide your inputs.”

9.  Enclosed is the [document name] for your perusal.

“Enclosed is the [document name] for your perusal” adds a touch of formality and is commonly used in more traditional or formal business correspondences.

This phrase suggests that the document is intended for thorough reading or examination, ideal for legal, academic, or high-level corporate documents.

  • In a legal communication, “To review the terms discussed, enclosed is the agreement for your perusal .”
  • When sending a research paper, “To assist with your study, enclosed is the bibliography for your perusal .”

10.  Please consult the attachment for further information.

“Please consult the attachment for further information” is a formal instruction that directs the recipient to view the attachment for additional, often essential, information that complements or completes the message conveyed in the email.

This phrase is suitable for professional settings where detailed data or instructions are provided as an attachment.

  • In a technical support email, “For detailed troubleshooting steps, please consult the attachment for further information .”
  • When providing detailed guidelines for a project, “ Please consult the attachment for further information on project requirements and deadlines.”

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How To Say ‘Please Find Attached’ In 21 Different, Smarter Ways

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Writing an email is not something that comes naturally to me. It is a space where I’d like to sound professional , but also add my style.

I am sure you must be going through something similar. 

More than anything else, I guess we all struggle with the common phrase ‘Please Find Attached’. It’s become something we all say all the time and yet, it makes no good an impression.

The thing is, we have grown so used to reading and writing it that coming up with something fresh feels … odd?

Please find attached infographic

But there are fresh and cool ways to say ‘ please find attached’ without using those exact words.

In this blog post, I share 21 smart please find attached alternatives to use in your emails. Feel free to copy any of these email templates and personalize them for your own brand or personal email communication.

Table of Contents

21 Creative Ways To Say Please Find Attached

please find attached alternative phrases for emails

1. As you will see in …

Instead of writing ‘please find attached’, try writing ‘As you will see in [attachment name]’. This phrase will tell the email recipient that you have shared an attachment, and also a bit about what’s in it.

Using a phrase like “As you will see in the sheet here” prepares the reader for what the email attachment is about. This way, they can choose to either download the file, view it, or directly share it with somebody else.

Here’s an email template for the first alternative to ‘please find attached’.

2. In the [x] appended with this email …

‘Appended’ means attached or supplemented (by), so that word makes for a great substitute for ‘attached’. However, if you say ‘please find appended’, you run the risk of keeping it boring all the same!

Try something like this 👇

3. Have a look at …

This is more of the direction that you are giving to readers. And the best part about this particular alternative to ‘please find attached’ is how easy it is to use in a sentence.

It also makes your email copy feel more like natural language since we use this term often in conversations.

👍

4. Download a copy of [x] for …

Just like the previous one, the following is also a clear direction for the readers about what to do with the attachment.

Almost 121 business emails are received daily, and one can easily forget to download files attached in emails.

Using a CTA like this reminds the reader about what they need to do with the attachment they have received.

Read Also: How to Write PS in Emails

5. Let me know your thoughts on [x] attached with this email

Looking to get a review on the attachment you are sharing? Use the following template as a different way to say ‘p lease find attached’ 👇

Read also: How And When To Say ‘My Sincerest Apologies’

6. For reference, I am adding [x]

To say you’re adding something to the email copy conveys the message just the same as saying ‘please find attached’, but in another way.

Only, it’s not annoying 😅

👉Lighten up your day with our collection of 11 email memes every marketer can relate to ! 😅

7. I am attaching [x] to help you …

Here’s another ‘Please Find Attached’ synonym.

Often, the emails we receive come with no clarity about what is attached and why.

It’d be so much better to say you’re attaching XYZ file to complete or help ABC action. This way, you avoid saying ‘PFA’ for the millionth time, and you also convey what’s expected of the recipient.

👉 Introduce yourself like a Pro with our How to Write a Winning Introducing Email Guide 😎

8. You’ll find [x], as requested in …

Emails are means of professional conversation. That means you’ll need to send files in response to some ongoing conversations.

At such times, you can use this email template:

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9. I am ‘sharing’ the documents …

A good thing about emails is that you don’t have to always attach a file in the conventional formats that require a download.

Today, thanks to Google Suite, we can use digital file formats like Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Slides, etc.

And since they are on Google cloud, you can simply add the web links for those documents as hyperlinks in the email copy.

If you don’t know how to say ‘I have attached the file in this email’ or ‘kindly find attached’, just use this template and you’ll seem professional 👌🏻

.

10. Here is [x] that …

Here’s another great ‘Please Find Attached’ synonym that does not use the actual phrase 🙂

Without any chit-chat at the beginning, this email template allows you to get straight to the point.

Since people don’t have much time to accept and share greetings – every single time – this will allow you to save their time and get to the important part quickly.

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11. Excited to share [x] with …

Sharing interesting stuff? Let’s tell them how you are feeling.

Using emotional expressions to share information adds more personality to the email copy.

.

👉 Want to write Introduction Emails that always get replies? Check out these Introduction Emails examples! 🤩

12. This [x] has …

What does the attachment have? 

You can share the context of the attachment by using this email copy, and you end up using better words than ‘please find attached’. Here’s a better way to structure your professional email in business communication (as opposed to a casual email): 

has detailed information on everthing you need.

How to Write PS in Email: A Guide For Good Writing

13. I have ‘linked’ …

Instead of saying ‘ link shared ‘ , you can say ‘linked’ when you are sharing a URL.

In my experience, the email recipients don’t receive the link sometimes. If you do not mention it clearly, they may not even know that an external link was attached.

for you to go through some of my published work.

👉Saying ‘sorry for the inconvenience’ is a common practice, but there’s a more effective way. Discover more in our comprehensive article .

14. If you have any questions about [x] …

This phrase directs the reader to take an action: go through the file attached and ask a question if they have one.

If you are sending a file to a new client, letting them know that they can reach back to you about it can make a lot of difference.

, let me know.

15. The enclosed document shows …

This phrase keeps the conversation professional and neutral in tone while also avoiding those three dreaded words in your email body 😅

to Our Team

Read Also: How to Nail Your Email Signature

16. Attached herewith is this …

Something that most readers won’t see often, and it would surely act as an attention grabber.

If you Google ‘herewith’, you’ll find it is a formal adverb meaning ‘with this letter’.

So, if you are looking for a professional alternative to ‘ please find attached’, what could be better?

17. We have more details about this in [x], please have a look

This phrase is another smart way of saying the same thing in other words …

.

Read Also: Mastering the Letter of Introduction: Examples and Tips

18. Enclosed is …

You can simply use ‘Enclosed is’ to keep your email short and direct.

It keeps the unnecessary chatter at bay and lets readers know exactly what you are sharing with them.

Read Also: How to Write an Invoice Email 

19. You’ll find the attachment below …

If you are looking for something to end your email message and can’t find something specific about the attached document you’re sharing, you may tend to just write ‘PFA’.

Try this instead:

20. I’ve attached my resume for your consideration …

We all know how important it is to put forward our best (including style, grammar, sentence structure, and all the nitty-gritty, small details) when it comes to sending a professional email for job applications.

Your potential employer has mere seconds to scan through your attached CV and determine if you are eligible for an interview invitation. There are better alternatives to ‘Please find attached my resume’. 

In many ways, your email acts as the cover letter for your resume along with a few additional information — so give it your best. 

Here’s an example ‘please find attached resume’ alternative with better wording: 

21. Attach file with no explanation

Let’s end this list by simply asking a question: Do you need to add a ‘please find attached’ alternative in the email?

When it’s a file, the receiver will surely see that you have sent an attachment. And if they’re expecting it already, why spell it out?

So, if you believe there is no need to say something, don’t.

Just shoot your email with the update and attach your file quietly, without the beaten-to-death ‘PFA’ alert.

The Proper Etiquette While Attaching Files

Just like the ‘table manners’ your parents schooled you in on, we have a few attachment etiquettes for you:

Don’t forget the attachment

Remember the feeling you got when you hit Send, only to realize that you forgot to attach the file? We’ve all been there. This meme perfectly sums up the embarrassing scenario: 

Forgot to attach the file meme

A good idea to avoid these situations is to always attach the file first, before drafting the email.

Bring attention to the attachment

Let the recipient know there’s an attachment, but ditch the overused, legalese-like ‘Please find attached’ jargon and use the alternative phrases from this blog post. Giving a heads-up is important if the recipient is not expecting an attachment. 

For example, say you’re replying to an email from the hiring team requesting your resume (after you’ve filled out the job application). In this case, there’s no need to explicitly say ‘Please find the attached resume’ or ‘attached my resume’ since it’s implied already. 

Give an apt file name

We often attach files without giving much thought to the file name — after all, it’s the content inside that’s important. 

Keep in mind that having a specific file name that shows the recipient the content is important. This is especially true for job seekers when attaching their resumes. Otherwise, they could come off as unprofessional and lazy in the eyes of a potential employer. 

Add a good email subject line

Subject lines are the first things your readers and potential customers see (even before they read your content).

If your subject line is boring, bad, or outright blasphemous, no one will click on your emails — even if your content is amazing. The styling and tone of your subject lines depend on the type of email: business letter, job application email, scold email, etc. 

Craft your subject lines accordingly. 

Check out this blog to learn how to write captivating subject lines. 

Read also: Get Noticed With These Classy, Unique, and Quirky Bio Ideas!

One more thing before you go …

Email outreach can be quite tricky, especially if you’re not already a Pro!

There are email tools that can help with running email broadcasts, tracking the email opens, following up with recipients who have opened or not opened your emails, and most importantly, automating the entire process.

We’d say the most affordable of all these tools is EngageBay . Plenty of our customers are super happy!

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If you’d like to know more, just sign up for free and we’ll give you a comprehensive product demo!

About The Author

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Nishant Shrimali

4 thoughts on “how to say ‘please find attached’ in 21 different, smarter ways”.

' src=

These are horrible suggestions. Please find attached is direct, professional and concise.

' src=

The goal in business email is to be as unambiguous and concise as possible. This is creating a solution for a problem that doesn’t exist.

' src=

I’m impressed, I have to admit. Rarely do I encounter a blog that’s equally educative and engaging, and without a doubt, you have hit the nail on the head. The problem is something not enough folks are speaking intelligently about. Now i’m very happy I stumbled across this during my hunt for something relating to this.

' src=

I will definitely use the tips above.

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please find the attached file for my homework

'Please Find Attached File' or 'Please Find the Attached File': Which is Correct?

please find the attached file for my homework

Wondering whether to write ‘please find attached file’ or ‘please find the attached file’? We’ll clear that up in this article and teach you how to use the phrase appropriately in a sentence.

The short answer is:

  • That ‘please find the attached file’ is correct. It’s not grammatical to say, ‘please find attached file.’

Which is Correct – ‘Please Find Attached File’ or ‘Please Find the Attached File’?

As you learned above, the correct way to say the phrase is ‘please find the attached file.’ It’s ungrammatical to say, ‘please find attached file.’

Just like phrases like ‘ play by ear ,’ ‘ sorry to bother you ,’ and ‘ drive safely ,’ this phrase often has incorrect variations being spread around.

Definition and Meaning

The definition of ‘attached,’ according to Merriam-Webster, is:

  • connected or joined to something
  • emotionally connected: having strong feelings of affection or concern
  • permanently fixed when adult

The definition of ‘file’ is:

  • a tool usually made of hardened steel with cutting ridges for forming or smoothing surfaces, especially metal
  • to rub, smooth, or cut away as if with a file
  • to arrange in order for preservation and reference
  • to place among official records as prescribed by law
  • to send (copy) to a newspaper
  • to return to the office of the clerk of a court without action on the merits
  • to initiate (something, such as a legal action) through the proper formal procedure

It also means:

  • to register as a candidate, especially in a primary election
  • to place items in a file
  • to submit documents necessary to initiate a legal proceeding
  • a device (such as a folder, case, or cabinet) by means of which papers are kept in order
  • a collection of papers or publications usually arranged or classified
  • any of the rows of squares that extend across a chessboard from one player’s side to the other player’s side
  • to march or proceed in a single file

But files can also be electronic.

So, what does the whole phrase mean?

Typically, it’s used in a corporate setting, meaning someone has attached a file to an email for your review.

Less Annoying Synonyms and Alternatives

This phrase has been so overused in the corporate world that it’s become pretty stale throughout the years.

That means we need to come up with new ways of expressing the same sentiment.

Take a look at a few different ways you could say, ‘please find the attached file.’

  • Please find enclosed [document name]
  • I’ve attached [document name]
  • I’m sharing [document name] with you
  • You’ll find the attachment below
  • Please see the attached [document name] for more details
  • Attached is [document name]

Using the Phrase Correctly in a Sentence

Now that you know the definition and some synonyms let’s take a look at how to use the original phrase in a sentence.

Here’s how you’d use ‘please find the attached file’ in a sentence:

  • Please find the attached file, and please advise on the next steps.
  • Please find the attached file you requested earlier.

Final Thoughts on ‘Please Find the Attached File’ and ‘Please Find Attached File’

To recap, the correct way to say the phrase is ‘please find the attached file.’ Without the ‘the’ in the phrase, it’s ungrammatical.

If you need alternative ways to say it, scroll back to the ‘Less Annoying Synonyms’ section.

That’s understandable if you’d rather use a different phrase because some English phrases, like ‘good to hear’ and ‘at the office,’ can be pretty tricky to remember how to use, especially if you’re learning English for the first time.

But don’t worry; we’ve created an entire library of articles dedicated to explaining complex rules of the English language and going over confusing words .

Learn More:

  • 'Please Advice' or 'Please Advise': Meaning and Differences
  • 'Attached Herewith': Meaning and When to Say It
  • 'Play by Ear' or 'Play by Year': Which is Correct?
  • ‘31th’ or ‘31st’ - Which is Correct?
  • ‘Per Cent' or 'Percent': Which is Correct?
  • 'A User' or 'An User': Which is Correct?
  • 'I' or 'Me': When to Use the Correct Word
  • ‘Analyses' vs 'Analysis': What's the Difference?
  • ‘Licence' or 'License': What's the Difference Between the Two?
  • ‘Labelled' or ' Labeled': What's the Difference Between the Two?
  • ‘Modelling' vs 'Modeling': What's the Difference Between the Two?
  • 'Lite' vs 'Light': What's the Difference Between the Two?
  • ‘Learnt' vs 'Learned': What's the Difference Between the Two?      
  • ‘Theatre' vs 'Theater': What's the Difference Between the Two?
  • 'To' vs 'Too' vs 'Two': What's the Difference?

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please find the attached file for my homework

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"Please Find Attached or "Please Find Enclosed" in a formal email?

In email writing, when we are attaching any document, what is the correct, formal and more polite way to write:

Please find attached "Monthly status report" PDF for your reference. Please find enclosed "Monthly status report" PDF for your reference.

Also, should we write the name of the file attached with format ect .ppt, .pdf, .docx? Sometimes I use PFA ... Is it correct?

  • phrase-choice
  • formal-language

ColleenV's user avatar

2 Answers 2

Please find attached "Monthly status report" PDF for your reference

would be appropriate; you cannot enclose anything in an email because they don't have envelopes.

However (in my opinion) a more formal phrasing would be something like

Please find the pdf "Monthly status report" attached for your reference

or, shortly put

Please find the file attached for your reference.

if it is clear what 'the file' is referring to beforehand.

Quick note of abbreviations: if the recipient has used it before in the same context, it's probably OK for you to use it, although it's better to err on the side of formality, especially when talking to a superior.

EnronEvolved's user avatar

When you would like a person to reference a document attached to the email, it would be appropriate to say "Please see the attached document." Documents are "attached" to emails, not "enclosed." You do not have to state the name of the document either, as it is assumed that the document attached is the one you are referencing. If there is more than one document attached, it might be better to say something like "Please see the attached document (filename.pdf)." DO NOT USE ABBREVIATIONS. Formal writing requires that you do not use abbreviations and contractions, as those are technically informal ways of talking (there are exceptions for things like ASAP, AM, PM, RSVP, etc.). PFA is not used whatsoever in English, even in informal writing, partially because we say "please see," not "please find."

Sam K's user avatar

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please find the attached file for my homework

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What is the *best* way to express that an email contains an attachment? [closed]

I'm wondering what is the best way to express that an email contains an attachment. I'd like to have a formal example, and an informal example.

For example:

Is this informal?

Attached you can find the document...

Is this too formal? too old school?

Please find enclosed the document...

Lauren's user avatar

4 Answers 4

Most email applications will have a clear indication (e.g. a clip icon) when the email has attachments. So you don't really have to explain that. Instead, you can focus on describing what exactly is attached to the email. For example:

The attached file is the document that you requested. The attachment is a draft Power Point presentation.

These can be used in formal and informal emails.

Community's user avatar

For informal emails you could use:

I've attached...

For more formal emails you could write:

Please find attached...

For a discussion of enclosed vs attached please see:

http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/22264-difference-between-enclosed-attached.html

Antony Quinn's user avatar

  • 1 I agree completely. I often write something like, 'I have attached a quote as discussed'. –  J D OConal Commented Sep 20, 2010 at 23:44

You may keep it concrete and polite (usable in formal/informal speech)

  • You may refer to the attached document for details
  • Please refer to the attached document
  • Kindly refer to the attached document

This will also cover your back against users arguing they missed it.

Wadih M.'s user avatar

Please see the attached document.
Please find attached the agreement.

Ivo Rossi's user avatar

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged formality email or ask your own question .

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please find the attached file for my homework

Ways to Say ‘Please Find Attached’ in Your Application

Quick Navigation:

Should you say ‘please find attached’ on your application?

List of other ways to say ‘please find attached’, how to decide which phrase to use, ‘please find attached’ example.

‘Please find attached’ is a somewhat outdated term you might use when sending a job application through email. It is a direct way of keeping the hiring manager aware of what they will find in your job application. This article provides instructions and examples of better ways to write ‘please find attached’ in an email.

Your application is a formal request to be considered for a job. Usually, such forms list their complete requirements, including the documents that must be attached. If your resume is required, the employer will ask for it. Saying ‘please find attached’ may seem a bit old-fashioned, and the verb ‘find’ does not convey the exact meaning required. Although the term is correct grammatically, it is exceptionally formal for the contemporary era. However, it is still necessary to indicate the presence of a resume in email while following the modern grammatical trends.

Here are some different ways to say ‘please find attached’ with your application:

‘I have attached my resume for your consideration’

This method conveys your intention indirectly and allows for maximum clarity. It helps to avoid poor grammar and punctuation style and also sounds polite. 

‘My resume has been included for your review’

This way is direct and professional while also asking the employer to review your resume. 

‘Let me know if you have any questions about my resume attached below’

This method takes an indirect approach to mention the attached resume. It also indicates your availability and willingness to clarify any doubts of the employer, and it creates both a positive and cooperative impression.

‘You will find my resume attached below’

Mentioning that the employer will see the resume attached eliminates the confusion. Writing ‘you will’ makes the message more like an imperative or declaration, while ‘please find’, makes the message a request.

Do not mention anything

If the application explicitly says that a resume is required, you do not need to reaffirm that it has been sent. The employer expects to find your resume attached to the email or physical application.

Your decision to select the correct statement for mentioning your resume in an email or mail should be based on the following steps.

1. First, check if the application explicitly asks you to send a resume

If there are clear instructions in the application to attach a resume, you may not need to mention anything regarding it. For example, if the application states, ‘Attach one hard copy of your resume with the application,’ then you may skip mentioning that a resume is attached. You may state that the required resume has been attached as a reaffirmation, however, if the application does not ask for a resume explicitly.

2. Next, analyze the job context

If your intended workplace has a formal environment, you must use a formal phrase. For example, you may say, ‘The resume has been attached for your review,’ or ‘The resume has been attached for your consideration’. However, if the workplace has a casual environment, you may use phrases like ‘I have included my resume’ or ‘Let me know if you have any questions about my resume attached below.’

3. After that, accurately state the placement of the resume

Make sure to state exactly where the resume is located. For example, if the resume is attached to the back of your application, you may say, ‘The second page has my resume details.’ However, if you are writing an email application, state, ‘I have attached my resume below.’

4. Fourth, look for directions mentioned in the job post

Sometimes, the application mentions a specific format. You must follow the exact format specified in the application. For example, there may be a checkbox in your application to tick if the resume is attached. Saying that you have attached the resume again may be unprofessional in such cases.

5. After that, make sure you are using a polite and professional tone

Your application is a formal document, so your message for the attached resume should be polite, professional and well-worded. Attaching a message with multiple grammar mistakes or informal tone may create a negative impression on your employer. 

6. Sixth, use an informative name for your resume

You may mention the name of the file in your application’s resume attachment message. For example, if you have included a printout of your Indeed profile, you may mention, ‘I have attached my professional profile for review.’ Also, if you are writing an email, you may say, ‘I have attached the link to my web-based resume for your review.’ Providing clear information about the attached file can increase the clarity of the message and create a positive impression on the employer.

7. Then, you may create a specific reference in your message

You may refer to your resume for specific information. For example, if you are sending an application for a writing job, you may mention, ‘Please refer to the attached resume for more details on my professional writing experience.’ Also, you may combine the message to refer to multiple items attached. For example, if you have attached both your resume and cover letter per the application’s requirements, say, “I have attached the required documents for your review.’ If, however, you have attached them voluntarily, say, ‘I have attached my resume and cover letter for consideration.’

8. Finally, refer to the application

You may refer to the resume within the application. You may say, ‘As the attached resume shows, I have worked with multiple multinational writing firms.’ The reference must fit well with the text of the application. You must refer to something relevant to the job you are applying to. For example, if you are applying for a marketing job, say, ‘The attached resume reviews my marketing experience.’

Here is an example of an email message indicating an attached resume:

Subject: Senior Research Analyst job application – Andy Hugh

Dear Hiring Manager,

I have been an admirer of Vertix Company and its environmentally friendly policies for many years. Finally, I have found a suitable opportunity to work with Vertix. I wish to be considered for the Senior Research Analyst position at your firm. I believe that with my experience and qualifications, I can bring significant expertise to the position.

I have attached my resume for your review. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards, Andy Hugh Research Consultant Sortep LLC

20 Less Annoying Synonyms and Alternatives to "Please Find Attached"

Aja Frost

Published: February 14, 2023

Between ebooks, case studies, data sheets, proposals, and contracts, you probably send email attachments on a daily — if not hourly — basis.

Office worker receiving an alternative for please find attached

That means you might be using the common phrase "please find attached.” Other variations include "attached, please find,” "please kindly find the attached file,” "please find the attached file for your reference,” and "enclosed please find.”

But the phrase is falling out of use. Below, we’ll cover the best "please find attached” alternatives.

Download Now: The Ultimate Guide to Business Communication [Free Guide]

Why "Please Find Attached" No Longer Works

Should you use "Please find attached"?

No. First, it sounds stuffy and overly formal. You want to strike a conversational, natural tone with your prospect — not write like a nineteenth-century lawyer. Second, this phrase is unnecessary. Your attachment will show up in the email, so there's no need to announce its existence unless your email doesn't already reference it.

Third, it's a "request" that's not optional. Like "thanks in advance," that can make prospects bristle.

Here’s an example of an email with the phrase:

It was great meeting you and the team today. I enjoyed getting to know everyone and look forward to putting BELOVED at the top of the SERPs.

Please find attached the cost breakdown for your yearly investment. Are you available next week for a ten-minute check-in call?

send-now-hubspot-sales-bar

In this example, the phrase "please find attached” immediately alienates the recipient and breaks away from the email’s friendly tone. It’s also redundant — if the cost breakdown attached, the recipient will find it.

A popular alternative to "Please find attached” is "Please find enclosed.” But is it actually better?

please find the attached file for my homework

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Please Find Attached vs Please Find Enclosed

Should you use "please find attached” or "please find enclosed”? The answer is neither.

"Please find enclosed” is the exact same as "please find attached.” The only difference is the last word. Some writers might stress that nothing can be "enclosed” in an email, since an email isn’t an envelope. Thus the correct term would be "attached.” But that distinction is minor, and the truth is that both can be used in a digital context.

If you prefer the term "enclosed” to "attached,” you can still use it. But we suggest using the alternatives below with the word "enclosed” instead of "attached.”

Alternatives to Please Find Attached

  • Attach the file with no explanation.
  • I've attached...
  • This [X] has …
  • I'm sharing [X] with you.
  • You'll find the attachment below.
  • Let me know if you have any questions about the attachment.
  • The requested document is attached to this email.
  • Relevant information is in the attached file.
  • The attached [X] includes…
  • When you review the attached [X], you will see...
  • Please see the attached [X] for more details…
  • Take a look at the attached [X].
  • Attached herewith this email.
  • I've linked [X].
  • For reference, I've appended…
  • Please see the enclosed…
  • ...added [resource] to this email.
  • The enclosed document shows...
  • Enclosed is…

Option 1: Attach the file with no explanation.

If the sole purpose of your email is sending an attachment, cut the phrase entirely.

Hey Marley,

Nearly doubled my connect call conversion rate this month. I'm still a little shaky on demos; planning on doing some extra prep for my next ones. Looking forward to discussing with you.

Option 2: "Here is"

You can also opt for "here's [title of the attachment]." Short and sweet.

Great talking to you today and learning more about Kensington's plans to expand into the French market. Here's the pricing information you asked for.

Let me know if you have any questions before our call tomorrow.

Option 3: "I've attached"

This is another simple, non-jargon-y alternative.

Hello Karim,

Congratulations on the promotion! I've worked with many People Ops directors (including LiveHire and 25/8) and know one of your first priorities is often increasing employee survey participation. I've attached an ebook with some helpful strategies — page 32 in particular has good ideas.

Would love to discuss how you could apply these to Granted; if you're open to that, here's a link to my calendar: [Link to Meetings tool.]

Option 4: "This [X] has …"

You can also describe the attachment's contents, such as, "This case study includes …" or "This business case explains …"

Hope your trip went well and that you got in plenty of beach time. This report shows the impact of effective sales training on quota attainment; might be useful to show to your boss if she's looking for potential ROI.

Option 5: "I'm sharing [X] with you."

This statement subtly puts you and your prospect on the same team, making your relationship feel more collaborative.

I did a little digging and found the answers to your questions. I'm sharing a PDF with you that lists our reselling policies. Let me know if you have any follow-up questions.

Option 6: "You'll find the attachment below."

You never want an attachment to go unnoticed. This ensures your prospect is aware of the information you attached, but keeps the tone conversational and light.

Thanks for telling me a little more about ABC's goals and challenges this year. You'll find the proposal we spoke about attached below.

Option 7: "Let me know if you have questions about the attachment."

This is another subtle way to communicate an attachment while letting your prospect know your door is open and you're available for questions.

Here are the white papers we spoke about this morning. Please let me know if you have any questions about the attachments.

Option 8: "The requested document is attached to this email."

When sending a document that has been specifically requested, make sure your prospect knows the information they asked for can be found in the attachment.

Thank you for your time this afternoon. The report you requested is attached to this email.

Option 9: "Relevant information is attached."

If the attached document expands on the topic of the email, call this out so the reader knows to reference the document for more information.

We look forward to having you join us at the conference. All event details are outlined in the document attached.

Option 10: "The attached [X] includes..."

For lengthier or more comprehensive documents, you can include a brief synopsis of what the prospect can expect to see when they open it.

The attached catalog includes the new products launching this year. Please let me know your selections so we can proceed.

Option 11: "When you review the attached [X], you will see..."

This statement both instructs the recipient to review the attached document and outlines what the document entails.

Thank you for your insightful questions in today's meeting! When you review the attached spreadsheet, you will see a full breakdown of the metrics we covered. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Option 12: "Please see the attached [X] for more details..."

This helps you clearly call out what the attached document is and what pertinent details it contains for your prospect.

Thank you for attending our monthly check-in. Please see the attached presentation for more details about last month's performance.

Option 13: "Take a look at the attached [X]"

Use this statement when you have a document that you need the recipient's feedback on.

Hi Eckhart,

Our team is developing our next catalog and would like your feedback on which design you prefer.

Please take a look at the attached samples and let me know which you think is better by 5:00 PM PST on November 6.

Option 14: "Attached herewith this email..."

If you are sending an email that is more formal in tone, this phrase is a good option. Because it is more business formal and may not hold up well in more casual conversations, we recommend using it sparingly.

Thank you for time during today's interview. I appreciated your thoughtful questions and am honored to be a candidate for the sales manager position. Attached herewith this email are my professional references.

Synonyms to "Attached"

Need some more alternatives? Switch it up with ‘attached' synonyms.

Option 15: "I've linked"

Whether you're linking to site pages or content downloads, let your prospect know to look out for a link, so they don't miss the valuable information you've included.

I'm following up on our conversation yesterday. I've linked our pricing page here [insert link] — let me know if you have any questions.

Option 16: "For reference, I've appended … "

Use this for a first introduction. If the prospect downloaded a piece of content from your site, let them know you noticed, and provide them with additional resources in your introductory email .

Thanks for downloading "10 Growth Hacking Ideas to Try." I've helped many small businesses like Danielson Design transform their marketing initiatives into lucrative campaigns. For reference, I've appended a client's case study below. Together, we grew their customer base by 30% in a period of six months.

If you're interested in implementing some of these strategies, I'd love to share more. Here's a link to my calendar: [Insert calendar link].

All the best,

Option 17: "Please see the enclosed … "

This is a bit formal, but it's helpful when attaching important documents that require action.

I'm excited to continue working with you to revolutionize Quinn Industries' warehouse efficiency. Please see the enclosed contract and let me know if you and your team have any questions.

Option 18: " … added [resource] to this email."

If you've wrapped up a call or meeting with a prospect, send them a recap email and include notes about what was discussed. It keeps the conversation at the top of your prospect's mind and reinforces key points and takeaways.

Thanks for your time today. I've added notes from our call to this email, along with key takeaways and action items. Reach out with any questions before our next meeting on Tuesday, October 16 at 2:00 PM.

Option 19: "The enclosed [X] shows..."

If you're using a document to reiterate a point or idea, mentioning the attached file will keep your reader focused on the key takeaway.

Hi Candace,

I look forward to continuing our partnership. The enclosed proposal shows the deliverables we would like to offer moving forward. Here's a link to my calendar [insert calendar link] — schedule a meeting at your soonest convenience to discuss next steps.

Option 20: "Enclosed is..."

This is a simple way to indicate a document needs the reader's attention without saying "attached."

Thank you for participating in our end-user survey. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Enclosed is a token of our appreciation for providing your thoughts.

These "please find attached" alternatives will make your emails feel less stiff and stilted. Small words, big impact.

How to Write an Email with an Attachment

Now that you have the best alternative phrases to "please find attached,” it’s time to compose your very own attachment email. Here are eight tips to help you write attachment emails that get opened — and read.

1. Collect your files.

Before ever writing a single word of your email, create or collect the files you wish to send. In some situations, the file may be straightforward, like a resource PDF you send to all prospects or a pricing sheet.

If you’re sending multiple files, compress or merge them. You’ll also want to change the file names and send the same file type whenever possible. No prospect wants to go through four files like this.

email attachment worst practices, files not collected

Make sure all the names are clean and easy to read, so the recipient knows what they’re receiving. Limit file type variation — send two types at most (a PDF and Excel file, for instance. Or a JPG image and a Word document). That way, your recipient doesn’t have to open more than two apps to see the files.

Look at the difference.

email attachment best practices, collect all files

2. Check your recipient(s).

before writing your email, ask… who’s getting this email? Why? How are people being sent your email? How many people are being copied?

Who’s getting this email? You should know your audience before you start composing your message. This allows you to strike the right tone and include the right information.

For example, if you’re sending out an updated set of HR policies to the entire company, your recipient list will be substantial and your tone can be friendly and matter-of-fact.

If you’re composing an email meant for C-suite executives, meanwhile, you’ll likely want to adopt a more formal tone.

It’s also worth double-checking all recipient email addresses to make sure you haven’t left anyone off the list or included anyone who shouldn’t have access to the attachment.

3. Compose a clear subject line.

Now it’s time to write your subject line. The subject line will determine whether your prospect or recipient will open the email.

When including an attachment, you’ll want to allude to what the recipient will find once they open the email. Here are some examples.

Clear subject lines for attached emails. Industry resources for [business name]. Presentation from today. Custom quote for [business name]. [Name of document] (e.g., “Partnership contract”).

Here are bad examples of subject lines for attachment emails.

please-find-attached_3

While these subject lines aren’t intrinsically bad, they’re not appropriate for an email with an attachment.

( Hot tip : Get inspired with these sales email subject lines and check out these email subject line tips ).

4. Open with a reference to your last communication

If you’re sending an attachment, then your recipient likely requested it during a previous conversation — whether it was in person, over the phone, or in another email.

It’s useful to refer to that in your first line, especially if you and the recipient aren’t coworkers or otherwise close. For instance, you might write:

  • "Thanks for chatting with me today."
  • "I enjoyed getting to know the Gallant Warehouse team yesterday.”
  • "Thanks for your form submission online — your ebook is ready for download.”

If you’re replying to another email with the attachment, you can potentially do without this step. You can also skip formalities if you’re sending something quick and informal to a coworker.

Here’s one example.

email example, Hey Jake, Here are the slides from today. Let me know if you have any questions. - David

5. Keep the body short and simple.

No one likes long emails. The more content you include, the less likely that readers will reach the bottom of your email, even if they’ve noticed the paperclip symbol that indicates an attachment.

The lesson? It’s worth keeping your email body short, simple, and to the point.

So, instead of saying this:

I was able to find the data discussed in our previous meeting. Apologies for the delay — it wasn’t where I thought it might be and had to spend some time looking for it across other sources. I also found other data you may be interested in, please let me know if so, and I can send you that information as well.

6. Use your "please find attached” alternative.

After briefly describing where you and the recipient engaged, it’s time to let them know that they’ll find the document you promised them.

In your "please find attached” phrase, you’ll describe what the document contains. Here are some examples:

  • "Here’s the quarterly financial report with a weekly breakdown.”
  • "I’ve attached the employment contract, where you’ll see your salary, benefits, and perks.”
  • "Take a look at the wedding photos attached below.”

7. Include a call to action.

Always close your email with a call to action. You want the recipient to walk away not just with a document, but with a reason to continue engaging with you.

Here are some examples:

  • "After you take a look at the document, I’d love to chat. Feel free to book some time on my calendar: [meeting scheduling link].”
  • "If you have any feedback or suggestions on the enclosed script, please drop them in Google Docs.”
  • "I’d love to hear what you think. Is there anything you’d like to revise?”
  • "After you review the contract, I’d love to check in. Are you available on Friday, January 16 for a follow-up call?”

With a CTA, you’ll ensure that the document isn’t just "hanging out,” but is acted upon.

8. Set up and add your email signature.

This step is not mandatory, but we highly recommend it. Your email signature should include your first and last name, profile picture, company, and job title. It should also provide additional contact details like links to social media accounts, websites, and phone numbers.

Here’s what a signature looks like in action:

Email Signature example

Custom email signatures add a touch of professionalism and help you appear more trustworthy, especially when you’re sending downloadable documents. It also helps remind recipients exactly who they communicate with.

( Hot tip: You can create a signature just like the one in the example with our free email signature generator ).

9. Review your email before sending.

Finally, make sure to double-check the documents for errors. If you’re using an email template to speed up the process, make sure to take out any generic placeholders for company names or staff titles and replace them with specifics.

Then, run a spelling and grammar check to make sure you’re not missing anything obvious.

Finally, read the email out loud to yourself. Given the sheer number of emails written and received, it’s easy to think you’ve written one thing when actually you’ve written something else. Reading your message out loud can help you spot potential errors, and save you potential embarrassment.

The Phrase "Please Find Attached” is Out

"Please find attached” is an outdated, clunky phrase. With the alternatives we shared above, you’ll write much more concise attachment emails and get more responses from prospects.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in November 2017 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

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10 Professional Ways to Say ”Please Find Attached”

When emailing a document to someone, it’s always polite to include an attachment. But what to do if you don’t have a file name? This is where the phrase “please find attached” comes in handy. It lets the recipient know that there’s an attachment waiting for them, without giving away any details about its contents. In this article, we will be exploring 10 professional ways to say “please find attached” in your emails. We will also be looking at some sample emails that include the phrase.

These are 10 Professional Ways to Say ”Please find attached” in an Email:

Sample emails.

Dear (NAME), Hope this email finds you well and all set. Please find attached a copy of the proposal we discussed earlier. I hope it’s what you had in mind and I look forward to hearing from you soon. Kind regards, (YOUR NAME),

Hi (NAME), Could you please fill out the attached file? We’re looking forward to your input and thank you in advance for taking the time. Regards, (YOUR NAME)

Dear (NAME), I hope you are doing well! Please find attached (FILE NAME). You can use it and let me know if you need any assistance. Thanks, (YOUR NAME)

Dear (NAME), We hope you’re enjoying the day so far. Please find attached our (PRODUCT NAME) documentation for your viewing. Please let us know if you have any questions or feedback. We’ll be in touch soon! Thank you, (YOUR NAME)

Good afternoon (SURNAME), Attached please find your documents. As discussed, please review these documents and send any feedback to my email. Thank you, (YOUR NAME)

Subject Lines For Email When You Attach a File

1) Subject: Here are the documents 2) Subject: Document Attached 3) Subject: Submission 4) Subject: Requested Document 5) I’ve got the document for you! 6) Here’s the document for (PROJECT NAME)! 7) Attached is the document you requested

Related Posts:

English Recap

9 Professional Ways to Say “Please See Attached”

please find the attached file for my homework

After including an attachment in an email, you should know how to refer the reader’s attention to it. You can say “please see attached,” but is it really the most professional phrase to use?

In this article, we’ve gathered the best alternatives to “please see attached.”

Is It Correct to Say “Please See Attached”?

It is correct to say “please see attached.” It’s a very common and formal phrase in emails. Most of the time, it’s a professional way to refer the recipient to an attached document.

It’s quite polite as well. After all, it uses “please,” so you can’t go wrong with it.

You can use it as follows:

Please see attached when you get the chance.

  • It’s a good formal phrase.
  • It’s very polite when attaching a file.
  • It doesn’t allow you to specify what is attached (i.e., “please see attached document” is incorrect).
  • It’s overused in most professional emails.

“Please see attached” is suitable in business emails. It’s one of the most useful phrases. But that doesn’t mean you can’t branch out and explore some synonyms.

You should read on to learn how to write an email with an attachment without “please see attached.” There are great options available to use.

What Can I Say Instead of “Please See Attached”?

  • Please refer to the attached
  • Please find the attached
  • Please review
  • I have attached
  • Attached, you’ll find
  • You can refer to
  • You should review
  • In the attached
  • Refer to the attachment below

1. Please Refer to the Attached

The first thing that you should change about “please see attached” is the inclusion of “the.” It might not seem like much, but “please refer to the attached” makes the phrase much easier to use.

For instance:

  • Please see attached.
  • Please refer to the attached file.

Notice how we can also include “file” when writing “please refer to the attached.” It allows you to specify what the attachment is . It’s a helpful way to guide the recipient to find what they’re looking for.

You can use it when emailing employees that have asked for a file. It’s a great way to share it with them and explain what they should look for.

Here’s a quick email example to help you:

Dear Tommy, Please refer to the attached file. I believe it has all the answers you’re looking for. Best wishes, Adam Tyler

2. Please Find the Attached

Another great option is “please find the attached.” Generally, “see” and “find” are synonymous in business emails . We recommend using “find” since it implies the recipient has to actively look for the attachment before they can read it.

It works best when emailing employers if you’re trying to share attachments like a resume or cover letter. It’s professional and respectful , so it works well when you might not know the recipient well.

This sample email should show you more about how it works:

Dear Mr. Kylo, Please find the attached resume. I hope you consider me for this position, and I’m keen to hear back from you. All the best, Sean Wallace

3. Please Review

The simple two-word alternative “please review” also works really well here. Above all else, it’s a very polite way to replace “please see attached.”

“Review” shows that you’d like someone to look over the attachment . It might be an invoice or spreadsheet, and you might need a fresh set of eyes to check things through to make sure there are no obvious mistakes.

Check out this email example to see how to use it:

Dear Ms. Martins, Please review the invoice for your reference. Though, I believe everything is in order with it. All the best, Greta Tamer

4. I Have Attached

You can’t be much clearer than saying “I have attached.” It lets the recipient know what you’ve done and that they should expect an attachment to be waiting for them at the end of the email.

It’s a clear and direct phrase that works well in most professional emails . We highly recommend it when you want to ensure the recipient doesn’t miss the attachment. After all, you couldn’t make it much clearer if you start an email with “I have attached.”

Why not refer to this example email as well:

Dear Lorena, I have attached the updated file for your review. Let me know if there’s anything else I need to change. Best wishes, Chris Poil

5. Attached, You’ll Find

Perhaps changing the word order will help to keep things interesting in your email. Try “attached, you’ll find” to direct the reader’s attention to an attachment . It’s a great way to let them know what to expect as you write the rest of the email.

You can use this when emailing employees . It’s very direct and clear, allowing the recipient to find the attachment as soon as they read the phrase.

Generally, it’s best to go to the attachment before reading the rest of the email when using a phrase like this.

If you’re still stuck, this sample email will help:

Dear Carly, Attached, you’ll find the letter sent by Mr. Barrowmore. Please let me know if you understand the contents. All the best, Mr. MacIntyre

6. You Can Refer To

A phrase like “you can refer to” works well to give someone a choice to review an attachment. Including “you can” shows that they don’t have to look at the attachment, but you would appreciate their attention in case they’re interested.

We recommend using this when emailing employees and sharing minor details about a work-related situation. While the contents of the attachment may not be important, some employees may still be interested to learn about it.

You should also check out this email sample:

Dear Daniella, You can refer to the documents to learn more about the situation. I also believe it covers all you need to know. Best wishes, Peter Taint

7. You Should Review

We recommend “you should review” when you want someone to look at an attachment. It encourages them to read through an attachment as soon as you send the email to them.

“Should” acts as a clear instruction . It shows that you would appreciate it if someone could review the information you’ve provided. The phrase is especially effective when you think the attachment applies to the recipient.

Here’s a quick example to show you how it works:

Dear Scott, You should review the file attached to this email. After all, I think its contents apply to you. All the best, Danny Helm

8. In the Attached

It’s good to attach files to help someone understand something. However, you can also explain the attachment’s contents without them needing to read it.

That’s where “in the attached” comes in. It allows you to explain what someone should expect after the open an attachment. You only have to give a brief rundown of what to expect.

This phrase works best when emailing employees . It shows you want them to understand what an attachment is doing in your email, even if you don’t think they’ll actually read it.

The following example should help you if you’re still stuck:

Dear Sammy, On behalf of the company, you’ll learn more about the issues in the attached file. However, is there anything else you need from us? Kind regards, Mr. Aberforth

9. Refer to the Attachment Below

Finally, you can say “refer to the attachment below” in formal emails . It works because it directs the reader’s attention below the email .

Generally, most attachments come at the end of an email (allowing readers to go through the whole email before investigating). That’s why “below” works here, as it shows the physical location of an attachment on the reader’s screen.

You can use this in business emails to clients . It’s a great way to let them know you want to share an attachment with them, and they should pay attention to what it says.

Also, why not refer to this example to help you:

Dear Mr. Carlton, As requested, please refer to the attachment below when you get a moment. It will explain everything. Kind regards, Tom Howard

  • 9 Formal Ways to Say “Talk to You Then”
  • 10 Professional Ways to Say “I Will Keep You Posted”
  • 10 Polite Ways to Say “I Called You, But You Didn’t Answer”
  • 9 Professional Ways to Say “No Worries”

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Our mission is to help you create a professional impression toward colleagues, clients, and executives.

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please find the attached file for my homework

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5 Creative Ways To Say Please Find Attached

5 Creative Ways To Say Please Find Attached

You can appear more professional to your customers by creatively substituting “Please Find Attached” in your emails. Word choice and occasional misuse of words can influence how a reader perceives something, including an email.

Instead of just stating that they are attached to this message, use the alternatives that are discussed here to make any email appear far more professional.

Table of Contents

Why “Please Find Attached” doesn’t work anymore

Does “ Please find attached ” make sense to use? No. It initially has a stuffy, too-official tone. As you want to communicate with your prospect in a casual, conversational manner, you don’t need to look more formal by using ‘Please find attached’. Furthermore, this phrase is unnecessary.

Unless your email already mentions it, your attachment won’t be visible outside of the email and doesn’t need to be made public. It is also a “request” that cannot be declined, similar to “thanks in advance,” that can cause prospective to bristle.

Why use these alternatives instead?

Here are the four justifications for using the “ Please Find Attached ” alternatives:

1) When opening the email, the recipient will be certain of what to look for.

2) Cliches like “enclosed” can be replaced to reduce the word count.

3) As you have written clear lines, you won’t have to worry as much about the mistakes.

4) It’s simpler for them because most people already know these words

Creative ways to say, “Please find attached.”

1.   for reference, i am adding..

It is another way of saying ‘Please find attached’ to say that you are adding something. But, it is not annoying.

I believe that has been some miscommunication about the sales management results.

A total of 25 leads were generated, of which 19 have been confirmed.

For further reference, I am adding a few screenshots from the sales management dashboard.

I hope you can understand. Let me know if you have further questions.

(Signature)

2.   Here is

You can use “here is” for short and sweet conversation

It’s great talking to you and learning about your product priorities in our shopping centre. Here’s the information about the pricing you asked for.

For further enquiry, you can call me tomorrow.

3.   You will find [x], as requested

Emails are mostly used for professional conversations, so you need to send files in response to on-going conversations.

You will find all the targeted keywords as requested from our previous month’s ad.

Based on the results we have, we can optimize our next campaigns.

4.   Kindly check the attached file given below

This helps to know what the attached item is and its details for your reader.

Thank you for attending our monthly meeting. Kindly check the attached file to learn further about our company’s 20 years of performance.

5.   Enclosed is

You can simply use ‘Enclosed is’. It lets readers know what you are sharing with them and keeps unnecessary conversation away.

Enclosed is the yearly report of the growth of the lead from our website traffic. I look forward to sharing a meeting with you and discussing it in detail.

How to write an email attachment

Finalize the list of files you want to send.

Make sure you are aware of the file you need to attach to the email and where it is located on your computer before you start to create the message. It is simple to quickly find them and include them in the email.

This process not only saves time but also ensures that you attach the right files. It can also assist you in accurately referencing the file in the email’s body.

Make a good subject line for emails

You can start composing your email after you have determined which attached files are necessary with the subject line. You must come up with a great subject line that captures the attention of your audience. Nearly 64% of readers only open emails based on their subject lines.

As the majority of recipients have a tendency to ignore emails with unexpected attachments, it’s advisable to include the file names in the subject line. Keep in mind that you should keep your subject lines brief and to the point. It is advised to keep the subject line under ten words even while including these facts.

Compose the body of the email

The body of the email is what comes next in the writing process. Its length is determined by the email’s objective. The body of your email, for instance, can be brief if all that needs to be delivered is in the attachments.

However, if the attachments support the email, a brief summary of their contents and a mention of it in the email body are required. An email must have supporting material in the email body if it has attachments, otherwise, the recipients may mistake such emails for spam.

Attach the files

It’s time to attach the files to the email once you are satisfied with the email’s body. This action can be taken at any stage of the email writing process . When you attach the files before writing the email’s body, you can later add or remove them if necessary.

Make sure that you have included the right files. If the attachments are unconnected, consider sending separate emails for each file.

Recheck your email before sending it

You may have carefully constructed an email with a brilliant subject line, engaging body copy, and even the required attachments included. However, wait a few minutes before sending it. It is because even a small error in your email can make you appear careless and unprofessional.

A broken link, a missing comma, or out-of-date statistics can irritate your reader or, worse yet, damage your reputation. Therefore, before sending your attached email, make sure to proofread and review it.

Final thoughts

Your emails will be more substantial and enriched with the help of attachments that provide more information. Use the ‘Please find attached’ alternative to make sure your attachment in emails provides your recipients a high value.

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Please find attached vs Please find the attached

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please find attached your homework

  • Thread starter volver
  • Start date Jan 3, 2021

Senior Member

  • Jan 3, 2021

Hello, I'm a French trainer and I work for a training center. The training center would like me to send some homework to my student. I would like to say the following to my students. As requested by the training center, please find attached your homework. Could you please send it back to me as soon as you have finished. Could you please let me know if it's well worded. Thank you. VOLVER  

The Newt

I would say "attached please find..."  

Do you mean that I should write "As requested by the training center, attached please find your homework".  

Hermione Golightly

Hermione Golightly

Yes, if you wish to use this rather old-fashioned phrase. I would say "The homework for [next week] is attached."  

It's homework for January so could I say "The homework for this month is attached."  

Myridon

Yes, you can say ' ... homework for this month ... '. I don't know how important it is to say that the training centre has asked you to send homework. What does it matter?  

Could I try following wording? "Attached is the homework of this month, requested by the training center" "Attached is the homework, an assignment of this month from the training center"  

  • Jan 4, 2021

Many thanks.  

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  1. 20 Fresh Ways to Write "Please Find Attached"

    For your convenience, I've attached…. I am sharing [file name] with you…. Find attached…. Attached please find…. Please check the attached…. I have attached [file name] for your review…. Enclosed please find…. For your immediate attention, please find attached…. You will find [file name] attached….

  2. 15 Professional Ways to say 'Please Find Attached' Via Email

    15 Email Templates to Help You Say "Please Find Attached". Having a set of ready-to-use templates can be a real time-saver when you're sending emails that include attachments. These templates help you get straight to the point, ensuring that your recipient knows to look for the attached document. They also add a layer of professionalism to your ...

  3. 10 Other Ways to Say "Please See Attached" in Email (With Examples)

    Here are ten alternative ways to say " please see attached" in email: I have attached [document name] for your review. Please find the attached [document name]. The [document name] is attached for your reference. You will find [document name] attached. Please refer to the attached [document name].

  4. 10 Fresh Ways to Write 'Please Find Attached'

    A nicely put email shouldn't be too much to work. In this piece, we discuss how to write useful alternatives to the "please find attached" phrase. 1. Attach the file with no explanation. 2. "You'll find the attachment below.". 3. "Here is…". 4.

  5. How To Write an Email With an Attachment (With Examples)

    Here are a few examples of how to mention email attachments: I've attached my resume here. Please see the attached budget report. Here's the PDF file you asked for. Please find attached the cost breakdown. You'll find the attachment below. The requested document is attached to this email.

  6. "Please find attached" in Email Writing and 19 Alternatives

    Please find the attached file for your reference. When something is said to be "for someone's reference," it means that the attachment serves as a source of information for the receiver. The receiver may have previously requested this information, or the sender simply wants to show it as an update or announcement.

  7. How To Say 'Please Find Attached' In 21 Different Ways

    21 Creative Ways To Say Please Find Attached. 1. As you will see in …. Instead of writing 'please find attached', try writing 'As you will see in [attachment name]'. This phrase will tell the email recipient that you have shared an attachment, and also a bit about what's in it.

  8. Ways to Say 'Please Find the Attachment' (With Tips)

    When you review the attached file, you can see the main points of the argument. Please see the attached [document type] for more details. Take a look at the attached [file type] for more information. I've linked [document name or file type] to show details. For reference, I've attached the relevant web links. Please see the enclosed samples ...

  9. 'Please Find Attached File' or 'Please Find the Attached File': Which

    As you learned above, the correct way to say the phrase is 'please find the attached file.'. It's ungrammatical to say, 'please find attached file.'. Just like phrases like ' play by ear ,' ' sorry to bother you ,' and ' drive safely ,' this phrase often has incorrect variations being spread around.

  10. "Please Find Attached or "Please Find Enclosed" in a formal email?

    Please find the file attached for your reference. if it is clear what 'the file' is referring to beforehand. Quick note of abbreviations: if the recipient has used it before in the same context, it's probably OK for you to use it, although it's better to err on the side of formality, especially when talking to a superior. ...

  11. How and When To Use the Phrase 'Please Find the Attached'

    The phrase 'please find enclosed' allows you to inform the reader exactly what they'll find in the electronic file attachment. For example, you can say something like, 'Please find enclosed a detailed summary of my past work and academic qualifications'. It's a formal expression, but it's a great phrase when attaching professional documents.

  12. formality

    The attached file is the document that you requested. The attachment is a draft Power Point presentation. These can be used in formal and informal emails. ... Please find attached the agreement. Share. answered Nov 4, 2010 at 11:52. Ivo Rossi Ivo Rossi. 2,276 14 14 gold badges 31 31 silver badges 39 39 bronze badges.

  13. Ways to Say 'Please Find Attached' in Your Application

    Make sure to state exactly where the resume is located. For example, if the resume is attached to the back of your application, you may say, 'The second page has my resume details.'. However, if you are writing an email application, state, 'I have attached my resume below.'. 4. Fourth, look for directions mentioned in the job post.

  14. 20 Less Annoying Synonyms and Alternatives to "Please Find Attached"

    Best, Farah. In this example, the phrase "please find attached" immediately alienates the recipient and breaks away from the email's friendly tone. It's also redundant — if the cost breakdown attached, the recipient will find it. A popular alternative to "Please find attached" is "Please find enclosed.".

  15. 10 Professional Ways to Say "Please Find Attached"

    2) We would like to provide you with a copy of the agreement that we have drawn up. 3) The attachment is included for your convenience. 4) Please find attached our proposal for your consideration. 5) We have attached a copy of the contract for your review. 6) Attached is a copy of the agreement that we have drawn up.

  16. 9 Professional Ways to Say "Please See Attached"

    1. Please Refer to the Attached. The first thing that you should change about "please see attached" is the inclusion of "the.". It might not seem like much, but "please refer to the attached" makes the phrase much easier to use. For instance: Please see attached. Please refer to the attached file.

  17. How to e-mail a professor? Hi I want to e-mail an assignment to my

    Here is an example of a brief cover note for your email Dear Prof.....[ insert the surname] Please find attached my student cover sheet together with my assignment/essay on " ".[ insert the title/topic of your assignment] due on [ date] If there are any problems with opening up this attachment, please let me know and I will resend it.

  18. E-Mail Writing: 19 Alternatives to "Please see attached"

    13. Kindly see attached file. "Kindly see attached file" is another common business email shorthand like "Please see attached file" earlier. Connotation-wise, "kindly" may sound a bit more polite than the usual "please.". This means that using this phrase makes your email more tactful.

  19. 5 Creative Ways To Say Please Find Attached

    Here are the four justifications for using the " Please Find Attached " alternatives: 1) When opening the email, the recipient will be certain of what to look for. 2) Cliches like "enclosed" can be replaced to reduce the word count. 3) As you have written clear lines, you won't have to worry as much about the mistakes.

  20. Please find attached vs Please find the attached : r ...

    A common phrase in emails would be something like "please consult the attached document". I hope this helped! "attached" is a verb - "I have attached my homework". "The attached" is a noun but you could still use it as - "My completed homework can be found in the attached / in the attachment". 245K subscribers in the EnglishLearning community.

  21. please find attached your homework

    Jan 3, 2021. #1. Hello, I'm a French trainer and I work for a training center. The training center would like me to send some homework to my student. I would like to say the following to my students. As requested by the training center, please find attached your homework. Could you please send it back to me as soon as you have finished.