How to Start a Cover Letter (Examples Included)

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opening sentences cover letter

By Mike Simpson

When you’re writing a cover letter, nailing the opening is a must. Your cover letter introduction has to draw the hiring manager in, giving them a clear reason to keep reading. That’s why learning how to start a cover letter is so vital; it’s your doorway to success.

After all, more than eight-in-10 recruiters feel that an awesome cover letter is enough to land a candidate an interview even if their resume is only a partial fit for the job. Cool, right?

So, are you ready to make sure that your cover letter opening is everything it can be? Great! Here’s what you need to know.

What Is a Cover Letter?

Alright, let’s begin with the basics. Before you can learn how to start a letter to the hiring manager, it’s helpful to know what a cover letter is in the first place.

We’ve actually taken several deep dives into the world of cover letters, including how to address a cover letter , the best cover letter format , how to end a cover letter , and a full overview of how to write a cover letter .

But the basic gist is that a cover letter is a written elevator pitch. It acts as an introduction to what you have to offer, with a bit more flavor than you can put in a resume.

In many cases, your cover letter is the absolute first impression you’ll make on a hiring manager. As they read, they get a feel for who you are, as well as what you bring to the table.

Do cover letters really matter that much? Yes, they do. Overall, 49 percent of hiring managers think that receiving a cover letter is important to the hiring process, which is a pretty good indication that they value them.

So, what are the parts of a cover letter? In most cases, a cover letter has:

  • Contact Information
  • Opening Paragraph
  • Body Paragraphs
  • Closing Paragraph
  • Closing Sentiment

While that seems like a lot, it really isn’t. In most cases, you end up with about a page or so of content. After all, a cover letter isn’t an autobiography of your life; it’s a concise, tailored introduction to who you are as a professional.

Generally, when you’re trying to figure out how to start a cover letter, what you need to focus on are the salutation and the opening paragraph. Those are what make the first impression and usually play a big role in whether the hiring manager reads the whole thing or not.

You may want to dig a little deeper, making sure your opening line really packs a punch. But, really, that’s all part of creating a great opening paragraph, isn’t it? Just keep in mind that your leading sentence needs to be an attention-grabber, and you’re in good shape.

Now, is your cover letter opening more important than the rest of the letter? Well, yes and no. If your start to your letter isn’t strong, there’s a chance the hiring manager won’t finish reading it. That means a fantastic cover letter introduction is essential.

But the rest matters, too. In the end, you want your first impression to be a doozy. It’s just that, if you don’t nail the opening to your cover letter, the rest may never get a glance.

Common Mistakes When Starting a Cover Letter

Before we dive into how to start a cover letter, let’s talk about some cover letter introduction mistakes you want to avoid. After all, a misstep at this early stage can cost you the job, so you really need to make sure you get it right.

First, one of the biggest mistakes you can make is not tailoring the content to the position. When you write a cover letter, you are speaking to one particular hiring manager, not everyone who may ever want to hire you. If you don’t focus the content on that specific job, you might not connect with that hiring manager, causing them to move onto a different candidate.

Second, being too generic can come back to bite you. You want to stand out from the crowd, so you need to make sure your cover letter introduction feels a bit unique.

Third, choosing the wrong salutation – or not including one at all – can potentially lead to some trouble. If you go the wrong way, you may not connect with the hiring manager as well or could even offend them a bit. That’s no good.

Finally, spelling and grammar mistakes are a huge deal. They make it look like you lack attention to detail, and that isn’t going to win you any fans.

How to Start a Cover Letter

In many cases, figuring out how to start a letter for your job application is much easier if you take it one step at a time. It lets you tackle everything in succession and gives you a chance to focus on each critical part, increasing the odds that you’ll genuinely nail it.

Here’s a quick step-by-step guide on how to start a letter when you’re trying o land a job:

1. Choose the Right Salutation

The salutation in your cover letter opening serves as a greeting. It’s a chance to acknowledge the reader directly, even if just for a brief second.

Ideally, you want to address the hiring manager by name, using an approach like:

Dear [Mr./Mrs./Ms./Dr.] [First Name] [Last Name]

Now, you can potentially add one more option to the list: Mx. This is a relatively new gender-neutral addition that’s favored by people who consider themselves nonbinary.

Generally speaking, you should only use “Mx.” if you are completely, 100 percent certain that it’s the hiring manager’s preferred title. You don’t want to go with it simply because you don’t know the hiring manager’s gender. Why? Well, since it’s a newer option, not everyone is familiar with it, so some hiring managers might think it’s a typo.

Additionally, people may have a variety of opinions about “Mx.,” and not all of them are positive. Since it’s a bit controversial in certain circles, you could offend a hiring manager by using it if that isn’t what they prefer.

So, what do you do if you know the hiring manager’s name but not their gender or preferred title? Worst case, go with “Dear [First Name] [Last Name]” instead. It’s a bit less formal, but it may be better than getting the title wrong.

If you genuinely don’t know the hiring manager’s name – and can’t figure it out with some research – you can try:

  • Dear [Job Title/Role] – Dear Hiring Manager, Dear Operations Manager, Dear VP of Sales, etc.
  • Dear [Department] – Dear IT Department, Dear Marketing Department, etc.

Those aren’t as personal, but they can do the trick. They at least speak to a particular individual, making it clear that you had a certain recipient in mind. As a result, they are much better than more generic alternatives.

What about “To Whom It May Concern?” Well, we’ve taken a deep dive into how to use to whom it may concern . But, in most cases, that isn’t your best. It feels outdated, for one. Plus, it doesn’t have a particular reader in mind, which isn’t ideal.

The same goes for “Dear Sir or Madam.” Along with being generic and incredibly old-school, it’s also a bit awkward. Plus, it makes it seem like you didn’t even try to come up with something better, and that’s never good.

2. Nail the Opening Sentence

Your opening sentence in your cover letter is what really needs to draw the hiring manager in. As a result, you want to make sure that it packs a wallop.

Usually, you have a few options that can pull this off. First, if you know someone at the company who referred you to the position, you can try name-dropping. Many hiring managers favor direct referrals, so it’s alright to make that connection clear from the beginning.

Second, you can lead off with a relevant accomplishment. This one can get a little tricky to do well. You really have to relate it to something in the role, and that isn’t always easy to manage without using a sentence or so to build in some context.

Finally, you can focus on your excitement. Hiring managers like people who seem passionate about the opportunity, so this route could let you start your cover letter on a great note.

With all of these, you want to make sure the opening sentence taps on the position you’re trying to land. It’s smart to mention the job title, department, and company, as that ensures the hiring manager knows why you’re writing. If it doesn’t fit in the first sentence, then it needs to come in on the second.

3. Round Out the First Paragraph

Generally, your cover letter opening paragraph is going to be two or four sentences long. If you didn’t get it into your opening sentence, use your second one to mention the job opening. That way, the hiring manager understands exactly why you reached out.

After that, it’s time to tap on some relevant skills. Use the job ad to identify high-priority capabilities. Next, treat them like keywords, using the exact same words and phrases to increase your odds of looking like a great match (and getting past an automated screener).

4. Quantify the Details

Numbers stand out visually in a cover letter. They actually draw the eye, as they aren’t as widely used as letters and most forms of punctuation.

By quantifying a detail or two, you create visual interest. Plus, you’re giving the hiring manager some helpful context about what you’ve achieved, something that can make you look like a stronger candidate.

3 Cover Letter Starting Samples

Sometimes, nothing helps bring some tips to life like a handy example or three. If you want to make sure you understand how to start a cover letter or are looking for some samples that you can use as a template, here are three cover letter introduction examples, each representing a different approach.

1. When You Were Referred

Dear Mr. John Doe:

During my 6 years as a sales professional, I’ve had the opportunity to collaborate with a number of amazing professionals, including Jane Smith, a member of your team who recommended I apply for the Account Manager opening at ABC Inc. In my last position, I managed a portfolio of 25 enterprise-level clients while also boosting sales by 15 percent year-over-year during my tenure. I believe that my penchant for strategic thinking, as well as my strong negotiation and communication skills, make me an exceptional fit for your position.

2. Leading with an Achievement

Dear IT Department:

Over the past 4 years, I’ve focused my career on the world of project management, recently earning by Project Management Professional (PMP) certification. Additionally, I personally oversaw five $50k+ development projects concurrently, each of which was finished on time and within budget. I feel that my experience as a leader, as well as my expertise in risk assessment and cost management, makes me an ideal fit for the Project Manager position at XYZ Corp.

3. Going the Excitement Route

Dear Hiring Manager:

When I saw the administrative assistant opening at ABC Company, I immediately knew I wanted to apply. As an office assistant with 6 years of experience, I have honed many key skills you’re hoping to find, including scheduling, report writing, and customer service. Last year, among 50 nominated colleagues, I was even recognized as the Employee of the Year, largely because of my passion and dedication to my work, something that I would love to bring to ABC Company.

Putting It All Together

Ultimately, you should now understand how to start a cover letter off in the best way possible. Use all of the tips above, and turn to the cover letter opening samples to serve as guides. That way, you can create an introduction that captures the hiring manager’s attention and keeps them reading, giving you a chance to showcase even more about why you’re such an awesome candidate.

And as always, Good luck!

opening sentences cover letter

Co-Founder and CEO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Mike is a job interview and career expert and the head writer at TheInterviewGuys.com.

His advice and insights have been shared and featured by publications such as Forbes , Entrepreneur , CNBC and more as well as educational institutions such as the University of Michigan , Penn State , Northeastern and others.

Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

About The Author

Mike simpson.

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Co-Founder and CEO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Mike is a job interview and career expert and the head writer at TheInterviewGuys.com. His advice and insights have been shared and featured by publications such as Forbes , Entrepreneur , CNBC and more as well as educational institutions such as the University of Michigan , Penn State , Northeastern and others. Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

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How To Start a Cover Letter With Examples and Tips

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  • How to Start a Cover Letter
  • Cover Letter Opening Sentence Examples

Personalize Your Cover Letter

  • What to Write in the Rest of Your Letter

Cover Letter Sample

More cover letter examples and templates.

Theresa Chiechi / The Balance

What's the best way to start a cover letter for a job? The first couple of sentences of your  cover letter  are the most important ones. Recruiters and hiring managers often spend mere seconds scanning your application.

If your cover letter doesn't grab their attention right away, they may never even get as far as the second paragraph. What should these all-important first sentences say? Keep in mind that you're hoping to differentiate yourself from the competition. Your goal is to explain to the reader who you are, why you're writing, and how you can contribute to the employer's success.

This might mean  highlighting a contact , providing a quick window into your relevant background and experience, or emphasizing a significant accomplishment that would make you an asset to the organization.

Think about why the hiring manager should select you, above all other candidates, for an interview, and you'll be on the right track.

How to Start a Cover Letter 

Be direct.  In these opening sentences, you want to explicitly let the reader know which position you're applying for. Hiring managers are often looking at candidates for several open jobs at any given time. Make sure it's easy for them to discover your intent. For example:

I am interested in the coordinator position at ABC company.

Mention a contact.  If someone  referred you to the position , include that information early on as well. Referrals are one of the key aspects to securing an interview, so be sure to mention yours right away. For example:

Jane Doe suggested I contact you about the job, as she feels my skills would be a good fit for the position.

State an accomplishment.  Try to state an accomplishment from your previous job. If you can, show how you added value to the last company you worked for. You might even add the job title you had if it's similar to the one you are applying for. For example:

As coordinator at XYZ Enterprises, I have increased my group's output by 37% over the past 15 months.

Express excitement.  Convey your passion for your work, and your excitement about the job and company. Your cover letter is an opportunity to sell yourself to the hiring manager, and to share why you're well qualified for the job. For example:

I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to meet with you to discuss what I have to bring to the position at ABC company.

Use keywords.  If you can include any  keywords  from the job listing, do so. You can mention a skill you have that was included in the post. For example: 

My track history of successfully managing teams and delivering projects on time and on budget makes me a good fit for this role.

Examples of Cover Letter Opening Sentences 

  • As an information technology professional with high-level management experience in the IT industry, I learned that the best way to achieve success was to utilize the resources I had by employing well-defined objectives and an attitude of empowerment.
  • I am very interested in the entry-level position that is available at ABC Investment Partners. I recently graduated from XYZ college, and my courses in investments, finance, and business have equipped me with a solid base upon which I plan to build my career.
  • I am writing to express my strong interest in the international marketing position open at WellCam, Inc. My colleague Janna Doling recommended that I contact you directly about this position, owing to the years I have spent developing successful campaigns for XYZ company.
  • I'm writing to express my interest in the editorial assistant position listed on Monster.com. Given my five years of editorial experience and excellent capabilities, I would appreciate your consideration for this position.
  • I have a very strong interest in pursuing a teaching career. With experience working at both elementary and high school levels, as well as in activities outside of the traditional classroom, I have a diverse background with much to offer.
  • I have the pleasure of being acquainted with one of the counselors on your staff, Eleanor Seville. She let me know about the open position and recommended that I contact you.
  • I was excited to read about the administrative assistant job opening at XYZ company. I have several years of administrative experience in a variety of fields, including insurance and finance.
  • I understand that you have been deluged with resumes since  Computer World  released their list of the best companies to work for. Mine is one more, but I do have experience that is hard to come by.
  • My proven track record of successfully performing complex analyses on various corporations makes me an ideal candidate for the analyst opportunity that you have advertised.

When you're not sure how to get started, it can be really helpful to review  examples of cover letters . You can use these as a guide, but be sure to tailor your introduction to your personal circumstances and the job you're applying for.

The more closely you  construct your cover letter  to show that you're a  match for the job requirements , the better your chances of getting selected for an interview.

What to Write in the Rest of Your Cover Letter

Of course,  the rest of your letter  is important too. You'll need to use an  appropriate salutation , and make your  cover letter closing  polite and inviting. In the  body of your letter , you have the opportunity to pitch your qualifications for the job in more detail than you have room for in your resume.

If there are specific events or accomplishments you feel are likely to make you stand out, you can briefly mention them and explain in more detail should you secure an interview.

Make sure your  contact information  is complete as well, and format your  signature  to match the letter style you are using.

Download the cover letter template  (compatible with Google Docs or Word Online) or read the example below.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

John Smith 37 Oak Street Middle Village, New York 10502 555-555-555 john.smith@email.com

March 22, 2021

Dr. Jane Doe All Smiles Dentistry 5 Main Street, Suite A Middle Village, New York 10502

Dear Dr. Doe,

My former coworker, Maria Rodriguez, suggested that I contact you to express my interest in the position of dental assistant in your office in Middle Village.

I’m a licensed dental assistant with over 10 years of experience helping dentists and hygienists make their patients smile. In my current role with ABC Dental, I have gained proficiency in the four-handed dentistry technique, as well as mastering Henry Schein Dentix software.

I also have the following skills and qualifications, as outlined in the job description on your website:

  • Experience taking and developing dental X-rays
  • Infection control expertise, including preparing and sterilizing instruments and equipment
  • Knowledge of several different types of scheduling software
  • Language skills (bilingual: English/Spanish)
  • Excellent customer service skills and attention to detail

Most importantly, I love people. I consider it a great privilege to help dentists improve their patients’ lives by providing the very best support and customer care.

I’ve enclosed my resume, and I hope you’ll contact me at your convenience to arrange an interview.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Review cover letter examples for many different types of jobs, and get downloadable templates you can use to write your own cover letters.

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How to Start a Cover Letter - 4 Tips for the Perfect Opening

Background Image

Here you are, looking at a blank document that’s supposed to be your cover letter.

You have a general idea of what your cover letter is supposed to be about, but you’re having trouble writing those first few sentences.

We get you! Whether you’re writing your resume, an article, research paper, or a cover letter, getting started is sometimes the hardest part.

Lucky for you, though, there is a very straightforward way to get started with your cover letter, and in this article, we’re going to teach you how to do that!

Read on to learn how to effectively get started with your cover letter! 

  • What should your cover letter opening contain
  • What to include in your contact information
  • How to start a cover letter greeting
  • How to write an attention-grabbing opening paragraph
  • 6 Examples of how to start your cover letter

What Should Your Cover Letter Opening Contain

To successfully get started with writing your cover letter, you should include these 3 main elements:

  • The header with contact information. Includes your & the recipient’s contact information.
  • The greeting to the manager. This is where you address the cover letter by greeting the hiring manager, department, or company.
  • An attention-grabbing opening paragraph. The opening paragraph of your cover letter is your chance to grab the recruiters’ attention and get them to read the rest of your cover letter.

Below, we’ll teach you how to do each of them in the right way.

If you’re applying for an entry-level job and wondering what’s the best way to write your cover letter, head over to our article on entry-level cover letters . 

What to Include in Your Contact Information 

As we mentioned, the first thing to add to your cover letter opening is your contact information. 

The header’s essential information include the following: 

  • Full name and professional title (if applicable)
  • Phone number
  • Email (a professional email, that is)

In some cases, you can also add the following: 

  • Social media profiles. By this, we mean profiles that are relevant to the position. This includes websites like LinkedIn , GitHub (for developers), or Medium (for writers).
  • Personal website. If you have a personal website you’ve created for your industry (i.e. you’re a writer with a blog), then make sure to include the link to your website on your cover letter.

After you’ve added your information, you should add the date and continue with the recipient’s name and address. So:

  • Manager’s name
  • Manager’s job title
  • Company’s name
  • Company’s street address

Once you’ve done this, here’s what your cover letter will look like:

how to start a cover letter

And just like the essential DOs, there are also some things you should NOT include in your cover letter header: 

  • Unprofessional email. It’s going to be difficult for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is something you coined when you were still a teenager (i.e. [email protected] ). 

How to Start a Cover Letter Greeting

After you’ve properly listed your contact information, it’s time to start writing your cover letter. 

The first thing this includes is addressing the cover letter to the hiring manager. 

Yeap, that’s right! And by greeting the hiring manager, department, or company, we don’t mean using the old-fashioned “Dear Sir/Madam,” or “To whom it may concern.”

Instead, you want to show your future employer that you’ve done your fair share of research about the job/company and that you’re not just using one cover letter template to apply for ten jobs. After all, one of the most common mistakes job seekers do (84% of them!) is not finding the hiring manager’s name and personalizing the application.

So, make sure to address the hiring manager that’s going to review your manager directly. 

Now, there are a few ways you can do that. 

The simplest - and most obvious - option is to look up the head of the department you’re applying to on LinkedIn. 

Let’s assume that you’re applying as a Communications Specialist at Novoresume. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer. 

After a quick LinkedIn lookup, you can probably find out who that person is (that’s me!). 

linkedin-search-example

And just like that, you have your hiring manager! Piece of cake!

Not a fan of LinkedIn? You can also check the company’s website and look for the “Team” or " About Us " page.

If none of these work, consider using one of the following greetings when you’re addressing the hiring manager: 

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager,
  • Dear Hiring Manager, 
  • Dear [Department] Team,
  • Dear Director of [Department],
  • Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team

How you conclude your cover letter is just as important as how you start it. To learn how to ace yours, head over to our guide on how to end a cover letter . 

job search masterclass novoresume

How to Write an Attention-Grabbing Opening Paragraph

The last, but the most important, part of your cover letter opening is your opening paragraph. 

You want your opening paragraph to be engaging and attention-grabbing to ensure that the hiring manager will continue reading the cover letter.

After all, recruiters receive hundreds of applications daily. Obviously, they can’t spend all their working hours reading cover letters, so, instead, they simply skim your cover letter in a handful of seconds, and if it catches their attention, they re-read it more thoroughly.

And the part of the cover letter that helps catch their attention is usually the opening paragraph! 

Compare these 2 cover letter openers and judge for yourself which one you’d rather read:

Dear Mr. Brown,

My name is Anna and I’d like to help your company exceed its sales target as a Sales Manager. My 5-year experience as a Sales Representative at XYZ Inc. has given me substantial skills in sales. During my last year working there, we beat KPIs by around 50%. I believe that my strong track record in sales makes me the perfect candidate for the position. 

Hello, my name is Mary and I am interested in working as a Sales Manager for your company. I have 6 years of experience working as a Sales Manager for Company X, so I think I’m a good fit for the position. 

While there’s nothing inherently wrong with the first example, it’s not all that imaginative. Chances are, every other applicant is going to use a similar opening statement.

The second example, on the other hand, is more customized and personal, helping the recruiter understand why Anna is a good candidate for the role.

In this section we’ll give you all the tips & tricks you need to ace your cover letter introduction:

Tip #1. Show Passion and Commitment

Showing the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the job will instantly boost your chances of getting hired. It’s not a secret that committed employees are more engaged and, therefore, more productive.

After all, research shows that engaged employees are 17% more productive than their peers.  

So, it’s only logical that the hiring manager will greatly appreciate a candidate who shows commitment and enthusiasm. 

As such, these are both qualities that you want to showcase right from the start of your cover letter. Here’s an example of how you can do that:

I have been immersed with human rights since I specialized in Conflict Resolution and started working with Amnesty International. During my 5 years of experience in the field, however, I haven’t seen any organization do the work that you’ve accomplished with human rights. Your dedication makes me want to work for your organization and put my skills to use for the work you do. 

Tip #2. Mention a Mutual Contact (if Applicable)

If someone referred you to the position, the opening paragraph of your cover letter is a great place to mention that. 

Referrals are key to securing an interview, but at the same time they’re not something you can mention on your resume, so take the opportunity to let the recruiter know at the start of your cover letter. 

The idea is that if someone the hiring manager knows recommended you for the position, your skills and qualifications immediately become more credible.

I was excited to learn about this job opportunity from John Doe, who has worked at your firm for five years. John and I worked on an architectural project together for over one year and he thought I’d be a good fit for the role at Company X. 

Tip #3. Prove You Have Researched The Company 

A generic cover letter will not give you many points in the eyes of your potential employers. 

The recruiter reading your cover letter wants to know that you’re excited to be applying for that particular company , and you’re not just applying to dozens of jobs randomly, hoping that one will stick. 

As such, it’s very important to do some research about the company you’re applying for, and in the cover letter, mention why you’re a good culture fit. 

I have always admired the work that your organization does with vulnerable communities. I have always been passionate about social justice and I think the mechanisms you have in place to empower those in need are really making an impact. I believe my previous experience as a social worker could bring value to your mission.

Tip #4. Lead With An Achievement

There’s no better way to grab attention than to lead with an achievement. It immediately gives you credibility and makes the hiring manager curious to read more about you. 

To make sure your achievements stand out, though, do this:

  • Whenever possible, make your achievements as quantifiable as possible. “Improved sales by 20% in 2 months” is more impressive than “improve sales.”
  • Show how your past achievement is relevant or can add value to your current position. 

As a Public Relations representative for Company XYZ, I worked with the press to improve its reputation and public image. This translated into a 40% increase in customer satisfaction and better public reception of the company’s values and identity. I am eager to yield the same results as the Head of Communications in your organization. 

Tip #5. Start With a Powerful Belief

A short and impactful belief statement that represents your work ethic and professional values is another great way to attract the recruiter’s attention. Obviously, you get bonus points if said belief statement aligns with the company’s goals and objectives. 

However, don’t just copy-paste the company’s mission statement to make a good impression. Rather, use your own words and beliefs to sound more genuine and original.

As a teacher, I believe every child should have access to quality education early on. This is the only way to ensure future generations’ equity and the best chance we have at improving our society. I admire your institution’s commitment to enabling quality education in the most remote areas of our country and I’d be honored to contribute to those efforts by becoming a teacher here. 

Tip #6. Be Direct  

Oftentimes, beating around the bush gets you nowhere. So, a great strategy to follow when you start writing your cover letter is to just be direct about the position you’re applying for and the reasons you believe make you the perfect fit for the job. 

There’s another upside to this. Recruiters receive hundreds of applications daily - sometimes, even for different positions within the same department - so it helps them to know what position you’re applying for early on, as well as what exact qualifications make you the perfect fit for the job. 

I’d like to officially apply for the marketing manager position at Company X. Over the past 7 years, I’ve worked with 6 clients, helping them drive more than $2,000,000 worth of sales. I am confident that my marketing skills and proven sales results make me a perfect match for the position. 

Match your cover letter with your resume to make a better impression on the recruiter and reinforce your personal brand !

matching resume and cover letter

Key Takeaways 

And that’s a wrap! 

Hopefully, you’re now more confident about how you can start your cover letter!

Now, let’s do a small recap of the most important points we covered in the article:

  • Your cover letter opening should contain a header with contact information, a greeting to the hiring manager, and an attention-grabbing opening paragraph.
  • Your header should include your contact information, such as your name, phone number, and professional email, the date, as well as the contact information of the recipient.
  • You should try to find the hiring manager’s full name in order to greet them. If you can’t find their name or title anywhere, then you should greet them using Dear Hiring Manager , Dear [Department] Team , or something similar.
  • The opening paragraph of your cover letter should grab the hiring manager’s attention and make them want to read your cover letter. Some tips to write an attention-grabbing opening paragraph include being direct, starting with a strong belief statement, or leading with a relevant achievement.

Related Readings 

  • How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024
  • Cover Letter Tips 
  • Cover Letter Mistakes
  • Do I Need a Cover Letter?

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How to Start a Cover Letter to Impress Employers [+ 14 Examples]

Caroline Forsey

Published: August 11, 2021

According to Career Builder, 40% of recruiters look for a cover letter when they're considering job applicants.

how-to-start-a-cover-letter

But if you had to flip through a hundred cover letters a day, and each one began, "To whom it may concern, I am applying for the digital marketing position at your company ...", how important would you rank them?

Your cover letter is an opportunity to showcase your personality, display your interest in the job, and include relevant information that otherwise wouldn't be surfaced in your application. An ideal cover letter leaves the hiring manager with a positive and memorable impression of you, something a resume alone won't always do.

To help you overcome writer's block and hook your reader right away, take a look at some sharp opening sentences you can use for inspiration.

5 Free Cover Letter Templates

Fill out this form to access your cover letters., creative cover letter opening sentence examples.

  • This position has me written all over it.
  • I've wanted to work in [your industry] since [this moment of inspiration].
  • Although [current employee] suggested I apply for this position, I don't just want to work with my former colleague again -- I want to join all of you in transforming the industry.
  • I like to think of myself as a round peg thriving in a square hole kind of world.
  • Aside from the requisite industry bona-fides in my CV, I bring the following to the table:
  • Last year, I generated [this much money] in revenue for my company, generated [this many leads], and almost tripled our social media ROI.
  • You might not know me, but your client services team certainly does, and now I want to join the vendor that made me such a successful [type of professional].
  • When I discovered [name of company] was hiring, I knew I had to apply.
  • I considered submitting my latest credit card statement as proof of just how much I love online shopping, but I thought a safer approach might be writing this cover letter, describing all the reasons why I'm the person who can take [name of ecommerce company] to the next level.
  • You might compete with my current employer, but why can't we be friends?
  • As a [current job position] with high-level management experience in the [industry], I learned that the best way to achieve success was to [biggest lesson you've learned].
  • I understand that you have been deluged with resumes since you've been listed as one of the best companies to work for. Mine is one more, but I do have experience that is hard to come by.

Read on to find out 14 ways to grab an employer's attention with an exceptional cover letter introduction.

Featured Resource: 5 Free Cover Letter Templates

Cover Letter Templates

Start off your cover letter (and finish it) with a bang with 5 Free Cover Letter Templates. The templates are professional and completely customizable to help you get your dream job. 

How to Start a Cover Letter

1. start with humor..

Employers are humans too, and they'll often appreciate a good joke, pun, or funny opening line as much as the next person. If done tastefully and respectfully, starting your cover letter off with a joke can be an excellent way to stand out.

Plus, a joke can still include a powerful explanation for why you're the right person for the job, without coming off as boastful. For instance, think about something you love to do or something you're really good at, and then imagine how friends or family might make a joke about it -- if you're really good at analyzing data, for example, a joke or pun related to that might be a good way to exemplify both your skills and personality.

Here's a good example of using humor to bring attention to your skills, from The Muse  (you'll notice this is one of our picks for most creative opening lines, earlier in this article):

"I considered submitting my latest credit card statement as proof of just how much I love online shopping, but I thought a safer approach might be writing this cover letter, describing all the reasons why I'm the girl who can take Stylight's business to the next level."

Why This Works

Right away, the personality displayed here grabs the reader's attention. Even better, this applicant uses humor to convey an important message to the employer -- she loves shopping, and she's well-versed in ecommerce as a consumer -- which might've otherwise not come up on her resume or phone screening.

2. Start with passion.

For an employer to know you'll stay dedicated to the role and company, they'll want to ensure you're passionate about what the job entails. Passion is more incentivizing than a paycheck.

For an employer, demonstrating how your passion matches the required skillset is a promising sign that you'd enjoy your job -- if you enjoy your job, you're more likely to stick around longer, help drive company growth, and become a dedicated member of the team.

Consider starting your cover letter templates with a few lines that showcase your passion: "I've been passionate about writing since I was ten years old. My love for writing has led me to write two personal travel blogs, get published in a local newspaper, and pursue two summer internships at publishing firms. Now, I'd love the opportunity to combine my writing skills with my interest in storytelling as a content marketer at Company A."

If you don't have extensive work experience in the industry you're trying to break into, but you've been unofficially preparing for years, let the employer know. In the above example, the candidate's resume would probably look weak, with only internships indicating professional experience. Her cover letter introduction, however, shows the employer she's been writing for audiences and advancing her natural ability for years.

3. Start with an accomplishment.

Employers like seeing numbers. It isn't enough to mention you're a "digital marketer with proven success in SEO strategies." Proven success? Okay, can we see?

It's more powerful to provide statistics. You want to show the employer you're capable of solving for long-term results. How have you contributed to your company's bottom line? For instance, did your Facebook marketing campaign grow your social media following, or has your blog content increased organic traffic?

Consider starting your cover letter with something like this: "Over the past year as digital marketing manager at Company A, I've generated $30k+ in revenue, increased organic traffic to our blog by 14%, and almost tripled our social media ROI."

Even if you don't have the work experience to report impressive numbers, you can still offer proof when opening with an accomplishment. Think about the qualitative feedback you've received from employers. For instance, how would your boss compliment you or tell you you're doing a good job? An accomplishment can be as simple as your boss sending you an appreciative email regarding your diligent meeting notes.

In this example from The Muse , the applicant provides an example of a skill for which he's been previously acknowledged: "My last boss once told me that my phone manner could probably diffuse an international hostage situation. I've always had a knack for communicating with people -- the easygoing and the difficult alike -- and I'd love to bring that skill to the office manager position at Shutterstock."

Even though the applicant doesn't offer numbers as proof of success, they do manage to highlight some proof of their past performance in the form of a former boss's praise. The candidate's candid and funny explanation -- that his last boss liked his phone manners -- is another good way to brag about accomplishments without, well, bragging.

How to start a cover letter by mentioning an accomplishment

4. Start with excitement for the company.

Employers want to know why you like their company, and they'll appreciate an explanation on why you're interested. But it's imperative your reasoning is thoughtful and considerate, and specific to the company. For instance, if you're applying for a financial position, don't write about your interest in finance; write about how your interest in finance relates to the company's goals.

You don't want to just say, "I'm excited to work at Company A because I'm passionate about finance, and I think my skills and experiences will be a good match." Sure, you've explained why you want to work in the financial industry, but you've done nothing to explain why Company A specifically suits your interests.

Instead, you'll want to mention something about the company and culture in correlation to your interest in finance. Take a look at this example from Glassdoor : "When I discovered Accounting Solutions was hiring, I knew I had to apply. I've been waiting to find a company where I feel like I can make a difference while working as an accountant. Not only are your clients awesome, but the overall mission of your company is something I believe in, too."

This candidate shows they've done their research and care about Accounting Solutions in particular. Remember, employers want to hire people who have a demonstrated interest in working at their company. They want someone who will enjoy the nature of the work, but just as importantly, they want a candidate who enjoys the work culture and the company mission as well.

5. Start with news about the company.

Mentioning company news in your introduction indicates you've done research on the company. Plus, including company news might give you the chance to incorporate your own values, as well. If the company just won an award for its innovative solutions in the computer industry, for instance, you might add how you value forward-thinking methods in technology, as well.

Here's an example of an introduction that uses a newsworthy event, from Indeed : "When I saw that Company ABC was featured in Fortune Magazine last month for its commitment to renewable energy and reducing waste in the workplace -- all while experiencing triple-digit revenue growth -- I was inspired. With my track record of reducing costs by 30%+ and promoting greener workplaces, I'm excited about the possibility of taking on the account executive role to expand your company's growth and work towards a more sustainable future."

The candidate does a good job demonstrating how Company ABC's news aligns well with the candidate's personal achievements. She shows she's done her research on the company, and also indicates she values similar environmental efforts in the workplace.

6. Start with what they don't know.

According to one seasoned hiring manager , a cover letter that begins, "I am writing to apply for [open position] at [name of company]" is grounds for nearly instant rejection. Of course you're applying for this job -- why waste your lede with something so boring and obvious?

Your cover letter should never directly state what they already know -- or restate what's already listed on your resume. Instead, start your cover letter by offering something new, expanding on what the employer already knows about you, and presenting new details about what you can bring to the company. Impress employers by telling them something about your skills or experiences they don't already know.

To offer new information not displayed on his resume, one of my colleagues at HubSpot wrote this cover letter introduction: "My resume will tell you I'm Content Marketing Certified. Your records will tell you I've interviewed for a few different HubSpot positions in the past. What neither one will tell you is that I've been working with your customer success team to build a new campaign strategy for my company -- one of your latest (and largest) clients."

The candidate wrote an introduction that captured the reader's attention and demonstrated he wasn't interested in wasting anyone's time. This is a memorable and impressive tactic. Consider writing a similar introduction, where you provide information absent from your resume, or even writing a letter of introduction instead of your typical cover letter.

7. Start with what you can bring to the table.

A hiring manager here at HubSpot told me she always looks for cover letters to tell her how the company and applicant can benefit each other.

Any employer is going to want to know why you think you can grow from the position you're applying to. An employer is more inclined to hire you if she thinks you have a genuine, intrinsic motivation to work hard in the role.

A hiring manager is also going to want to know how you'll contribute to the company's larger vision and goals. It's important for the manager to know what you want to get out of the role, but it's equally important to know how you'll help the company grow. How will the company benefit from you, over someone else?

Here's an example: "I am seeking opportunities to improve my writing ability in a forward-thinking environment while growing organic traffic and optimizing content to beat out competitors in search engines. At Company A, I believe I will find that match."

See how it works? In the example above, the candidate explained how she'd benefit from the role. She also explained what Company A could get out of the transaction -- increased organic traffic, and optimized content -- so the hiring manager is informed of the equality of the potential relationship.

8. Start with a statement that surprises them.

When applying for a role at HubSpot, one of my colleagues began her cover letter like this: "I like to think of myself as a round peg thriving in a square hole kind of world."

Doesn't that make you want to keep reading? It certainly kept me interested. Of course, you'll only want to include a bold statement if you can follow it up with some concrete supporting information. My colleague, for example, continued by writing this: "What does this mean? It means that my diverse background makes me a well-rounded candidate who is able to comprehend, develop and execute various functions in business."

While the rest of her cover letter veered on the side of professional, her opening line was casual, quirky, and surprising. Plus, you feel her personality in the line, and when an employer feels like a real person is behind the cover letter, she's going to want to keep reading.

9. Start with a lesson you've learned in your career.

A great way to start a cover letter is with a lesson you've learned in your industry from your experience.

For example, you might say something like, " As a [current job position] with high-level management experience in the [industry], I learned that the best way to achieve success was to [biggest lesson you've learned]."

This opening sentence lets a recruiter know your experience level. Not only that, but it starts off with how you can benefit the company, not how the company will benefit you.

10. Start off with intrigue.

When you're applying to larger corporate companies, you know that recruiters are getting hundreds of applicants for one entry-level position.

It's important to intrigue the hiring manager and recognize that they're looking at several applicants.

For example, you could say, " I understand that you have been deluged with resumes since you've been listed as one of the best companies to work for. Mine is one more, but I do have experience that is hard to come by."

After this, it'd be great to list examples, stats, and experience that set you apart from other candidates and will benefit the company.

Recruiters see countless resumes and cover letters every day. It's important to start your cover letter in a unique way so you can stand out amongst the crowd.

11. Start with a mutual connection. 

If an internal employee suggested you apply for a role at their company, don't be shy about highlighting that fact. Hiring Managers will want to see that you've been vetted — even informally — by someone else at the company. Recognizing the name of someone they know internally will likely persuade them to give you another look. 

To do this tactfully, start with something like this: "At the suggestion of my old colleague Jane Smith, I am submitting my resume for your consideration for the senior copywriter position. Jane's knowledge and enthusiasm for Company X further convinced me that this is a company where my communication skills, passion for travel, and desire to be challenged can be met."

Why This Works 

When the hiring manager sees a fellow employee can attest to your work ethic, it helps assuage any risk she might feel she's taking by hiring someone she doesn't know personally. Plus, it shows you've done your research and you're truly interested in the company itself — rather than sending off a slew of generic cover letters, you took the time to identify an internal connection.

How to start a cover letter by mentioning a mutual connection

12. Begin with your personal mission statement. 

Don't have a personal mission statement? You might want to take some time to create one . A good mission statement can help hiring managers understand why you're passionate about what you do — which goes a long way towards ensuring you'll work hard in your next role. 

A few examples on how you might start a cover letter with a personal mission statement look like this: "As a content creator, I believe inspiring readers through creative, persuasive copywriting is vital for helping them excel professionally."

Or: "As a leader, I believe encouraging innovation and creativity is critical for ensuring my employees can do their best work and improve the lives of our customers."

A manager can help you level up on certain key skills, but she can't teach you to love your job. By demonstrating an intrinsic motivation, you're essentially telling the hiring manager, "I know the importance of this role — so I won't slack off on it."

Editor's note: This post was originally published in May 2018 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

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How to Start a Cover Letter That Grabs Attention

11 min read · Updated on August 03, 2021

Lisa Tynan

Get your cover letter off to a strong start by addressing it appropriately, greeting your reader, and writing a memorable opening sentence.

In this age of digital job postings and applicant tracking systems, many believe that a cover letter is no longer expected or necessary--but thinking this can put your job application at risk. It's imperative to know how to write a cover letter , and how to do it well.

While there are many mixed messages out there about cover letters, one that's well-written can still put you ahead of other job candidates and sometimes be the deciding factor that gets you hired in that it gives the hiring person a good first impression of you. 

In fact, unless the job posting specifically states that no cover letter is required (in which case the posting instructions take precedence), you should always plan to include a cover letter with your application.

What is a well-written cover letter ? One that grabs attention right from the start with the correct company name and address, the proper greeting, and a memorable opening sentence.  

Addressing a cover letter (including an email)

Always place the company's name and address just before the greeting. If at all possible, find and include the name of the recruiter or hiring manager. (More on this coming up.) 

Use the same heading, font type, and font size as your resume to create a feeling of organization and flow. 

As for your name and contact information, there are several acceptable options. Remember that your name is the thing that immediately grabs attention, so make sure it's there along with the contact details. 

Add only your name, phone number, and email address just above the company information as shown below. This gives a recruiter two ways to contact you at a glance. Leave a space between the end of your information and the start of the section with the company's details. 

Here is an example of the layout:

[Your Name]

[Contact Phone Number]

[Email Address]

[Name of Recruiter/Hiring Manager]

[Street Address]

[City, State ZIP]

Dear [Name],

Or you can choose to add more information if you like.

Use your name, full address, phone number, and email address in this same space at the top.

[Your Street Address]

[Your Contact Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

Use either Option 1 or 2 under your signature line at the bottom of the cover letter.

When I was a recruiter, I liked having all the candidate's information all  in the same place rather than broken up between the top and bottom of the cover letter, so I suggest choosing one or the other. It just makes life easier for the person (or system) reviewing your cover letter. 

This information would generally be on a separate cover letter attached to an email. In this case, keep your email brief, and simply use a closing (Sincerely) with your first and last name at the end of the email.

However, if the email is actually the cover letter then choose one of the options above and use it in the actual email.

The correct cover letter greeting

Believe it or not, this can be what ends your job prospects with that particular organization. People take pride in their names and in their gender status. Depending on the hiring person, they could feel insulted if you get it wrong, especially because you might have found this information with a little research or didn't opt for something gender neutral.

Use the hiring manager's name

You can find the hiring person's name in any number of places. Here's an excerpt from another TopResume cover letter article with more detailed information.

If you're not given the name of the hiring manager, here are some effective ways to discover their name by using:

The job description: Check this document for the hiring manager's name. While it's not generally listed, you never know. If it's not obvious, there's also a trick to quickly discover an email in the job description that might contain the name; while in the document, press Ctrl +F or run Command + F and search for the @ symbol.

An email address: If you discover an email address, it may not have a full name but rather a first initial and last name or just a first name like [email protected] or [email protected]. A Google search combining the person's name as shown in the email and the company name might find you the person's full name.

 A LinkedIn post: A name connected to the LinkedIn job posting is probably that of the hiring professional who posted it, so use that name in your greeting.

The supervisor's title: It's more likely that a job description will list who the new hire will report to — such as the director of accounting — without listing a name. In this case, there are several search options:

Search the company's website for listings of staff members by title.

Run an advanced LinkedIn or Google search for all directors of accounting at that specific company.

Check with your network for someone who might know the person's name or search the appropriate professional networking sites.

Contact the company by phone or email. Tell them you're applying for [job title] and want to address your cover letter to the right person.

Use job titles/department names if necessary

When asked about how to address a cover letter effectively , one of our TopResume Writers states, “ As a general rule, I always stay away from anything approaching 'To Whom it May Concern' (this may be obvious).”

Next, unless you are absolutely sure of the person's gender or gender preference, don't use “Mr.” or “Ms.” in your greeting. I also advise against using “Mrs.” at any time, since you generally can't discern a woman's marital status. 

You can also use the person's job title if you have it along with their last name: 

Hello Director Smith

Greetings Vice President Jones

Hi Accounting Manager Johnson

If you only have the person's job title or their general department from the job description, consider these options:

Dear Head of Design

Hello IT Department

To Company ABC Recruiter/Hiring Professional

Hello Marketing Hiring Team

Greetings Customer Support Hiring Group

Professional titles such as “Professor” or “Dr.” are definitely acceptable as a cover letter salutation and should be used with last names as a sign of respect. Be on the lookout for these and other titles to include.

If after all this you still don't have a name, job title, or department name, simply use Dear Hiring Manager.

Stay Professional

There's another less-common scenario worth mentioning: You already know and are on a first-name basis with the hiring manager. In this situation, I recommend staying with a formal greeting using the person's last name. 

You never know who else is going to see your cover letter, and accusations of potential favoritism (even if false) will hurt both you and the hiring manager. Always be professional in the hiring process.

Never Leave It Blank

All these greeting options may seem awkward, but they are much better than using the wrong name or gender in your greeting, or worse: adding no greeting at all. 

There's no reason to leave the greeting blank when there are so many options that can be used effectively in how you write your cover letter. Including a greeting, even a general one, will impress any hiring professional and greatly improve your chances of moving along in the hiring process.

Punctuate properly

In truth, it doesn't really matter what punctuation you use in your cover letter greeting. Generally a comma or a colon are equally acceptable after the person's name. However, don't include a comma between the words of greeting ( Dear/Hello/Greetings ) and the person's name and/or title.

This is correct for both a separate cover letter and an email as a cover letter.

Check (and check again) before you hit “send”

As a job applicant, it's generally fine to re-use the same cover letter for similar or even non-similar positions. However, you must make it a habit to review each cover letter thoroughly before you submit it.

Double and triple check that you've used the correct hiring manager name/company in both the address area and the greeting. The minute a recruiter/hiring manager sees a different name and company than their own, the cover letter--along with your resume and hopes for that job--will be thrown in the trash.

Next, be sure the position title matches the company. You might get by with this mistake, but a good recruiter will catch it and potentially toss your application.

Finally, review the body of the letter to know that you've included the right set of experience and skills for that job. The section below offers more details on this.

Crafting a great opening sentence

Your cover letter opening sentence should make it obvious to the reader that you're applying for that company's specific position. 

This means you should include the job title in your first line. “Always include the position you are applying for,” says TopResume writer Brandon C. “Customize this sentence to make the rest of the cover letter feel custom as well - even if there is nothing else that you change as you use it for different applications.” 

If the positions you're after are very similar, there's really no need to change other parts of the letter except the hiring manager name and position title--but it's always in your best interests to make sure.

When cover letter changes matter

Start by reviewing all your job descriptions against each other, looking closely and the skill requirements. If it appears that each job is looking for pretty much the same skills and experience, you can use the one cover letter for each of those applications (remembering to change the specifics mentioned above).

However, if you spot any major difference in what's required for each role you will want to change each cover letter to point out that you possess those specific skills and qualifications. If a company wants product development experience and you don't show them that or show completely unrelated skills from a generic cover letter, you likely won't get the job.

Also, check the education requirements for each role, and adjust that accordingly on your cover letter.

Once you have a basic cover letter, it only takes a few minutes to review and change any parts that show you to be a well-qualified candidate for the job.

Good opening sentence examples 

Here are some additional examples of strong cover letter opening sentences from TopResume writers.

I like to begin by introducing the customer as who they are as a professional, including their line of work and a few adjectives. For example: "As an executive product development professional with a passion for transforming new concepts into finalized, breakthrough products and solutions, I am an ideal candidate for your (Job Title) opening."

If someone is a recent grad or new to the workforce, I tend to highlight their recent degree, a few transferable skills, and/or their passion for whatever industry they're trying to tap into.

Niki Beaulieu, Senior Resume Writer

I would always recommend something along the lines of, "As a dedicated and established leader in (career field) with a passion for driving (specialty) operations, I eagerly submit the attached resume in hopes of joining your organization as a valuable member of your (specified field) team."

This is of course just one example, and this particular opening could be broken up in a multitude of ways as well.

Brandon C., TopResume Writer

There are a variety of ways to create your opening sentence, but as the above examples show you should include whatever specifics make sense and will get you noticed, including:

Your current or desired career field

Specific skills applicable to the job

Related work experience

Related education

On-going career goals

And it bears repeating: Always include the correct position title, company name, and greeting.

One final note: Since this article focuses on starting a cover letter, you might want to check out some good sources on how to effectively complete the cover letter , including additional paragraphs and the best way to close your letter. You might also want to review another great article on how to avoid cover letter mistakes .

To sum up, hiring managers do read cover letters , so always plan to include one with your application. It will help you stand out from the crowd and improve your chances of getting hired.

Is your cover letter is cutting it?  Our resume writers don't just help you with your resume . 

Recommended Reading:

What You Should Include in a Cover Letter For a Job  

Ask Amanda: How Do I Write a Great Cover Letter?

  • How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

Related Articles:

7 Best Problem-Solving Skills for Your Resume + Examples

7 best time management skills on a resume (with examples)

Highlighting Writing Skills on Your Resume

See how your resume stacks up.

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How to Start a Cover Letter: 7 Great Cover Letter Openings (+Examples)

Kaja Jurčišinová — Staff Writer

Beginnings are always hard. The same goes for writing a cover letter. You know exactly what you want to say, but you’re not sure how to start a cover letter.

Generally speaking,  the cover letter intro is a place where you should:

  • introduce yourself in detail
  • explain why the job is exciting for you
  • show you’re a great fit for the position

Of course, there’s no single right way to do it. That means that you’ve got multiple options and can get a little creative.

Whether you’re looking for a traditional cover letter introduction, or something more unconventional, you’ll find it in this article — together with a quick guide and cover letter openings examples.

Alternatively, you can also just watch this quick video guide on how to write a cover letter below.

Successful cover letter introductions (examples)

We’ve gathered some really good opening lines from successful cover letters that got people hired in well-known companies such as HubSpot, Siemens, or Lush:

HubSpot Director of Business Development Cover Letter Sample

cover letter opening sample

Account Executive Cover Letter Intro Sample

cover letter opening sample

Sales Associate at LUSH Cover Letter Intro Example

Cover letter opening sample

Siemens SCADA Engineer Cover Letter Intro Template

Cover letter opening sample

Warner Bros. Public Relations Intern Cover Letter Example

Cover letter opening sample WB

Do you want to know how to craft such a strong cover letter opening yourself? Follow a quick guide below.

And if you prefer to see more examples from hired professionals or find a job-specific cover letter example for your industry, visit our  cover letter library .

Intro paragraph: a quick guide on how to start a cover letter

When it comes to cover letter openings, rule number one is that you should always start your cover letter in a way that grabs a recruiter’s attention from the get go.

On the other hand, be careful and stay professional. Don’t overdo it.

So the question is — when should you pick a standard opening paragraph and when to go with something more creative?

Well, it all depends on a particular job and the company culture .

Take time to research each company where you’re applying for a job and identify its tone of voice.

Are they formal or casual? Look at the job description, their website, and social media accounts and you’ll be able to get the right idea.

Then in your cover letter opening, follow at least one of these 7 main principles :

what to include in your cover letter opening

1. Be direct

Employers are busy people who usually don’t have time to read long texts or overused  cover letter phrases . What they want to know is simply whether you’re a good fit. Why not make it easier for them and be specific from the very beginning?

Let them know what position you’re applying for and use your cover letter opening to highlight years of experience in your field and any relevant  hard or soft skills   you bring to the table.

It’s a universal, yet effective answer to how to start a cover letter.

Cover Letter Intro Example #1

I am very interested in the Sales Specialist opportunity at [Company XYZ] that was advertised on LinkedIn. I am a hard-working and dedicated individual with over two years of extensive industry experience, a Business & Management degree from McGill University, and a strong determination to meet and exceed all business goals and objectives.

2. Respond to the company’s needs

Employers want to know how you can contribute to their company. The first paragraph of the cover letter is a great place to demonstrate that.

Have a look at the job offer, go over the company’s needs, and pick those that you can easily relate to.

Then take a look at your achievements and impressive skills, and use them to illustrate how you can bring value to the new job. Ideally by mentioning any quantifiable results from your previous jobs.

Cover Letter Intro Example #2

Over the course of last year, I more than doubled [Company XYZ]’s Twitter followers and ran two successful Instagram ad campaigns that generated $35K+ in revenue. I’d love to bring my expertise in organically expanding the social reach and delivering ROI to the social media manager position at [Company XYZ].

3. Include company facts and news

Companies want to see that you’re interested in them and their industry. If you show that you already know about them and have done your research, you can make a great first impression.

Browse their website and scour the internet for related news articles. They can provide you with interesting facts that pertain to your role.

It can be anything — a specific event, fact, notable statistic, or an award that the company has recently received.

Cover Letter Intro Example #3

When I saw that [Company XYZ] was featured in Fortune Magazine last month for its commitment to renewable energy and reducing waste in the workplace, I was truly inspired. With my track record of reducing costs by over 30% and promoting sustainable technologies, I’m excited about the opportunity to take on the account executive role to expand your company’s growth and work towards a greener future.

4. Highlight a mutual connection

Referrals can work like magic when it comes to getting invited to a  job interview . So if someone has recommended you for a position or you know anyone at the company who can vouch for you, mention their name right away.

After reading your cover letter, recruiters will most likely want to learn why your referrer thought you’d be a good fit. If nothing else, it will make recruiters pay attention to the rest of your cover letter.

Cover Letter Intro Example #4

I was excited to learn of this job opportunity from my former colleague, Lucy May. We’ve worked closely together for several years, most recently on a complex data analysis project at [Company XYZ]. She advised me to apply as she thought I’d be a good match for this position on your team.

5. Show passion for what you do

Employers love job candidates who are enthusiastic about what they do. These candidates tend to perform better and are more dedicated to their roles.

So if you’re all hyped up about your job, don’t hesitate to infuse your cover letter with a couple of sentences demonstrating your excitement about what you’re doing.

Cover Letter Intro Example #5

I knew I had a knack for writing ever since I was the main editor of our high school magazine. Thanks to my 15+ years of experience, I’ve transformed my passion into a fashion blog with 30K+ monthly readers, featured articles on Time and Cosmopolitan that have garnered over 50K views, and a writer’s workshop I founded for young up-and-coming writers.

6. Open with a relevant accomplishment

Hiring managers like achievers. If you’ve accomplished something noteworthy while with your previous employer, there’s a good chance you can bring the same value to your next job too.

What’s more, it shows that you’re an expert in your field.

If you have any special skills or accomplishments that will make you stand out from other job candidates, mention them right away in your cover letter opening.

However, try to make no general claims without providing evidence. Support your arguments with real numbers and statistics.

Cover Letter Intro Example #6

Over the past year as digital marketing manager at [Company XYZ], I’ve generated $50k+ in revenue, increased organic traffic to our blog by 18%, and almost tripled our social media ROI.

7. Use humor and creativity

Recruiters are human beings, too (shocking). In a pile of boring resumes and repetitive  cover letters and motivation letters , they may find a good joke, juicy pun, or funny opening line a nice refreshing break.

It can even be a reason to call you up for an interview.

So if the company seems to have an easygoing vibe, use humor to bring attention to your skills or relevant personal traits that are needed for the position you’re targeting.

Cover Letter Intro Example #7

Before I flood you with all the reasons why I’m going to be your next writer, I would like to tell you a little about myself. I didn’t learn to hold a pencil until I was about six years old, which made everyone think I’d never pen a single letter. And now here I am, bidding to become your next Shakespeare.

Cover letter beginning: What other things to include?

Now that you saw some great examples of cover letter openings, you may wonder what else can you do to perfect your cover letter introduction.

Well, there are a few other key elements that a good cover letter beginning should include :

  • contact information both for you and the company
  • headline (optional)
  • personalized greeting

To know where to put this information, just scroll down.

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This is the place for your and your company’s contact information.

Make sure that right at the top of the page you list your contact details such as:

  • phone number

Optionally, you can also include:

  • your professional title
  • date of birth
  • current date
  • personal website/LinkedIn

Additionally, never forget to add company-related information . You should always include the manager’s recruiter’s name (if it was made available to you), job title department, the name of the company, and their address.

Left align all of this information. Or make it easy for yourself and choose a pre-designed  cover letter template   and only fill in the details.

Headline (optional)

You don’t have to include it, but it can help you grab the hiring manager’s attention.

In your cover letter headline, you can use numbers, questions, or interesting adjectives .

It can be something like “5 Ways I Can Help You Improve Your Company’s Marketing.”

Alternatively, you can just state the name of the position you’re applying for.

how to address a cover letter

Salutation (or how to address a cover letter)

Try to avoid using “To Whom it May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” . This form of address, while correct, has become so overused it won’t help you stand out at all.

Instead, try to research the hiring manager’s name online . Look at the job posting, and check the company’s website or  LinkedIn . (Did you know that you can turn your LinkedIn profile into a great resume  with just one click?)

Alternatively, you can address it to the whole team or HR.

Generally, stick to these rules:

  • How to address a cover letter to a recruiter or hiring manager:  The best practice is to use a personalized greeting in the following form: “Dear [first name]” or “Dear Mr./Mrs. [last name]” for formal companies.
  • How to address a cover letter to multiple recipients: If you’re addressing your cover letter to the entire team or human resources, you can use “Dear [name of the company/department] Team” or “Dear Human Resources” .
  • How to address a cover letter to an unknown person: If you fail to find the hiring manager’s name and don’t want to address your cover letter to an entire team or HR, use “Dear Hiring Manager” , or “Dear Recruitment Officer” .

After the salutations, you can continue with an attention-grabbing intro paragraph.

HR expert tip: Christy’s word of advice

“In general, a traditional formal cover letter is the safest bet. But there are times when you can totally throw that advice out the window and have a bit of fun putting your personality on paper! Take a look at how the company brands its ‘voice’ on its website and in the job description. Do they sound relaxed and personality-driven? Is formality anathema to them? If yes, don’t be afraid to reciprocate (while still keeping it professional). After all, you’re not just applying for a job: you’re applying to be part of the company’s culture”. —  Christy Morgan, Resident HR Expert

Key takeaways: How to begin a cover letter

To sum up — the beginning of your cover letter will determine whether the hiring managers will read the rest of it or not.

If you want them to pay attention to what you have to say, make sure your cover letter opening:

  • Uses a personalized greeting
  • Says who you are
  • Shows you’re passionate about the job or the company
  • Highlights your top (and relevant) accomplishments and skills
  • Mentions a mutual contact
  • Reflects the company’s tone of voice
  • Is tailored to a specific position and company’s needs
  • Uses keywords from the job description
  • Is short, nice, and direct

Of course, the rest of your cover letter is important too.

If you’d like to know what to write in the rest of your letter, check out our complete  cover letter guide , get inspired by  cover letter examples , or learn how to  end a cover letter .

This article was recently updated. The original article was written by Nikoleta Žišková in 2021.

Kaja Jurčišinová — Staff Writer

Kaja Jurčišinová

Kaja Jurcisinova is a fresh graduate and a junior copywriter at Kickresume. Kaja completed her undergraduate degree in Art History at the University of St Andrews in 2018 and graduated with a Master’s in Arts and Culture from the University of Groningen in 2021. She was an intern at multiple cultural institutions across Europe, including the Dutch Museum Association in Amsterdam, the Matter of Art Biennale in Prague, and the European Cultural Centre in Venice. At the moment, she resides in Visby on the Swedish island of Gotland.

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30 Opening Sentences to start your Cover Letter

30 Opening Sententeces to start your Cover Letter

Writing a cover letter is not something most people look forward to. It is one of those tasks that come with every job application but not something that is easily done. Eventhough the cover letter has become less crucial for a job application over recent years (first selections based on just a short look at the CV’s or LinkedIn profiles has almost become the standard procedure). But nevertheless you are still expected to send a cover letter to accompany your job application. Particularly the start or the first sentence of the cover letter can cause difficulty. Some believe that the first sentence is crucial for your job application and that it should blow away the reader of your cover letter. Fortunately this is almost never the case (maybe when you are applying for a position as a creative writer…). Using a traditional (or conservative) first sentence is not something a recruiter will see as a dealbreaker, especially when the content of your CV stands out from other candidates. But when the competition in your area is fierce and the content of your CV is not (yet) sufficient to differentiate yourself from other candidates, your cover letter, and especially the first sentence, can help you to grab the recruiter’s attention.

There are several starting points possible for your cover letter. You can use a tradional or conservative first sentence. A traditional first sentence is very acceptable when you are applying for a formal position or at a very formal company. A very appreciated way to start your cover letter is to express your excitement or enthusiasm for the job opening. If you want to create more personal connection between the company / the recruiter and yourself you can start your cover letter on a more personal note by sharing your passion or inspiration. Another smart way to demonstrate a connection between the company or the recruiter and yourself is to use name-dropping. Do you want to get straight to the point and you immediately want to differentiate yourself from the competition? You can start your cover letter by pointing out your strengths and experience in the first sentence. When you are writing a speculative job application requires a different approach. For each category we have composed several example first sentences.

TRADITIONAL / CONSERVATIVE OPENING SENTENCES

  I’m writing to express my interest in the position as [position title] at [company name]

I’m writing to apply for the position of [position title] at [company name].

I would like to propose my candidature for the position of [position title] with [company name].

I was very interested to read the job post for [position title] at [company name], I herewith send you my CV to consider.

Please find enclosed my CV as application for the position as [position title] at [company name].

SHOWING ENTHUSIASM / EXCITEMENT AT THE START OF YOUR COVER LETTER

With great enthusiasm, I am writing in reponse to your advertisement for [position title] at [company name].

I was excited to come across the job post for [position title] at [company name].

I’m excited to be applying for [position title] at [company name].

I’m excited to present my CV to you for the position as [job title] at [company name].

Throughout my career I have always been eager to accept exciting challenges. The opportunity to work for [company name] as a [position title] and to work on the challenges described in the job description sparked my enthusiasm.

USING NAME DROP AT THE START OF YOUR COVER LETTER

I was excited to receive a message from John Adams about a job opening in the [department name] department of [company name].

Last week I met John Adams from your sales department at the London fashion week event. He kindly informed me about the job opening for [job title] at your company.

A mutal friend of ours, John Adams, recently suggested I should apply for [position title] at your company.

When I visited your store in [location] last week I was excited to come across the job post for [position title] at the message board.

FOCUS ON EXPERIENCE OR STRENGTHS IN YOUR COVER LETTER

As an experienced account manager, I strongly believe in data analysis as a source of new opportunities.

As a marketing manager I have experienced the rise of digital marketing in a highly competitive business environment.

My extensive experience in sales, marketing and leadership, as well as my excitement for new challenges, has motivated me to apply for the position of [position title] at [company name].

After spending five years of leading a marketing team in an international business environment, I am looking for an exciting new challenge.

As a sales expert with a passion for the travel industry, I read your advertisement for the position of [job title] with great interest.

USING A PERSONAL APPROACH

Ever since I was in nursery school I wanted to become a teacher.

As a passionate traveller, I enjoy meeting new people, learning about new cultures and adapting to changing circumstances. I was excited to see all these elements in the job post for [position title] at [company name].

As a inspired volunteer in my own local community, I have watched [company name] efforts to support local communities all over the UK with great admiration.

I’ve wanted to work in the hotel industry ever since I visited a hotel with my parents for the first time when I was five years old.

[company name]’s goal to reduce the co2 emission in the transportation industry inspired me to visit your website. There I was excited to see there is the current job opening as [position title].

As a social worker, I believe that every child should have the opportunity to explore life in a safe environment.

OPENING SENTENCES FOR A SPECULATIVE COVER LETTER

I’m writing to enquire whether there is an opportunity available to join [company name] as a [position title].

I’m interested in working for [company name] for some time, therefore I am writing to explore if you have any current [position title] vacancies.

I’m writing to inquire into your need of a [position title] at [company title].

I’m very interested in the business activities of [company name], I’m writing to enquire whether there are any current [position title] vacancies.

Do you need someone that can motivate your sales team to reach challeging targets and to explore new opportunities? If so, look no further!

There are probably many more categories of first sentences you can think of. In some industries it is popular to write a bold or creative first sentence to draw the attention to your job application.  think that there is one category of first sentences missing from this overview; the bold and creative first sentences. It is not that we don’t believe a bold or creative first sentence can help you to stand out from other candidates. Making a bold or creative statement at the start of your job application is something that has to come from your own creativity and it has to suit your personality. If you write “look no further, I am the perfect candidates” you should be able to back this attitude up during a job interview.  Bold or very creative statements are a bit of a acquired taste, there is a chance that you strike exactly the right chord, but there is also a good chance that you strike out and reduce you chances.

We have gathered the sentences above to give you inspiration to start your cover letter. We know from our own experience that the first sentence of your cover letter can sometimes feel like the most crucial element of your job application. But in reality it hardly ever is, even with a very traditional or conservative first sentence you can be successful. Don’t let the first sentence of your cover letter hold you back from applying for your dream job!

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Cover Letter Opening Sentences to Start Your Cover Letter

Let’s say you’ve used an  online cover letter builder  and created a cover letter, that’s great; but wait, before you send your cover letter off, let’s double check the cover letter’s opening sentence.

If your cover letter opener looks exactly like your original template, you absolutely need to read this article:

To Whom It May Concern,

I am writing to you to apply for the position of _______ at the company _______ advertised on… Zzz…

Oops, sorry. That was just the hiring manager taking their afternoon nap.

While it’s really important that the hiring manager knows why you’re writing to them, your cover letter opening sentence shouldn’t put them to sleep.

Here’s a breakdown of three unique cover letter opening sentences that will inspire you to write a cover letter that will get noticed, not snored on.

1. Cover Letter Opening Sentence #1: Match the Brand You’re Applying For

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All I ever wanted to do when I was growing up was bake pie. Luckily, my passion developed into a lifelong love of (and need for) long distance running, which is why I’m thrilled to apply for the Public Relations Manager position at the Adidas running department.

While this cover letter opening sentence clearly shows the purpose of the cover letter (to apply for the Public Relations Manager position at Adidas), it’s still fun, unexpected, and impassioned. The unique writing style suits the youthful tone and branding of the athletics industry.

This cover letter opener also uses a little humor, which is important when applying for a position that generally looks for candidates who are outgoing and charismatic, such as a Public Relations Manager.

2. Cover Letter Opening Sentence #2: Stay On-Point and Professional

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I’m famous among my friends for two things: orienteering in the woods and being a computing whiz, so I know I’d be a great fit as a web developer for your map reading app.

This cover letter opening sentence grabs the hiring manager’s attention because it isn’t what you’d expect to be reading at the beginning of a cover letter. However, it’s still highly professional and stays on-point, which is important if you’re applying for more senior positions.

3. Cover Letter Opening Sentence #3: Surprise the Hiring Manager

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Five years ago, I’d be the last person to apply for a sales representative position at a water sports adventure store. But discovering my passion for surfing (and kayaking, sailing, scuba diving, and every other water sport I can try) has inspired me to change my career so that I can continue to do what I love – and help others discover how empowering riding the ocean can be.

This cover letter opening sentence is effective because it immediately catches the hiring manager’s attention. The cover letter goes on to explain why the candidate is a great fit for the job and why they’re so passionate about working with water adventure sports.

For more must-have info on cover letters, check out The Ultimate Guide to Cover Letters for cover letter tips and tricks, cover letter samples, and more articles on how to write the perfect cover letter for your next job application now! If you’re searching for jobs online, be sure to search the latest career and job postings here !

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Write A Killer Cover Letter In 15 Minutes With This Simple Formula

T here are some things that college just doesn’t prepare you for. For example, how to dress business casual (seriously, how ?), or how to prepare for working a 9-to-5 job for the rest of your life. As someone who has recently entered the world of job searching , I’m finding that there’s one thing I really wish I had learned in a college class: How to write a cover letter.

Most jobs I’ve seen require both a resume and cover letter to apply, and I’ve found myself dreading having to write a new letter for every single position I want. (Seriously, who has time for all this?) I know I’m not alone: In a 2024 Her Campus survey of 562 respondents, nearly 3 out of 10 said they are unlikely to apply for a job that requires a cover letter. While taking the extra time to write a cover letter seems like a pain, skipping out on applying altogether could mean you end up missing out on some great opportunities.

When you’re trying to put yourself out there to employers, crafting individual letters can really slow the process down; honestly, it’s discouraging to think about spending hours and hours writing when you want to be searching for more opportunities. 

To perfect the art of writing a quick and easy cover letter, I spoke with LinkedIn’s Top Recruiting Voice and Director of Recruitment at Swan Resumes, Brittney Swan . Not only did I get some amazing advice on what to include in one of these letters, but Swan also gave me tips to create the perfect cover letter template that you can use any time you need one. And the best part is, it won’t take you more than 15 minutes to put together.

First, let’s establish what a cover letter is.

So, what is a cover letter, exactly? Cover letters are an introduction to your resume and your application. “It should be a quick snapshot of your qualifications and it should directly link your experience with a specific job description or company,” Swan tells Her Campus.

When you’re browsing LinkedIn or Indeed, job posts will (hopefully) have a blurb that describes the positions, tasks, and qualifications the company is looking for. This is what you want to connect your own skills and experiences to in your cover letter. 

It’s important to distinguish what a cover letter shouldn’t be, though. “Candidates might not realize that cover letters are not the same as a letter of intent or a SOQ letter (which is a set of questions designed to demonstrate your knowledge on a subject),” Swan says. “Companies [may] ask for a letter of intent , which means you need to explain what you would do in the role if accepted versus a cover letter, which is explaining your qualifications and professional experiences.” 

One other thing a cover letter should not be is a retelling of your life story. Adding extra information that is not needed or not applicable can actually hurt your chances of getting hired. “Your life story, your family’s life story, or personal information can make it illegal to hire you based on [workplace] bias laws,” Swan says. So, it’s best to stay away from these personal details in a cover letter. 

Here’s a quick and easy format hack for your cover letter intro.

Essentially, the simple format for a cover letter is this: an introduction + qualification + qualification + qualification + conclusion = a completed letter. 

A great way to open your letter is by establishing your interest in the company and giving a brief introduction to your recent experience. “Write an opening statement starting with the job title and explaining your experience,” Swan says.  “Then write what you’re looking for in this role or joining the company — growth, challenge, et cetera.”

Swan provided a sample introduction that you can tailor to your own needs: 

“This letter is to express my interest in joining your growing organization, through an open (title) position. The last XXX years have encompassed [explanation, explanation, explanation]. My hope is to become a part of your organization, as I believe [explanation, explanation, explanation].” 

Here’s what to include in the middle. 

After your intro, this is where the bulk of your explanation comes in. “The second paragraph directly links what the company is asking for with the experiences you have,” Swan says. This is a great time to tie in all that information from the job posting blurb back to what you bring to the table. 

This explanation section doesn’t have to be super long. It’s just telling the company that over the span of however many years, you did a certain amount of relevant work, and since the job listing indicates a need for someone with a certain set of skills, you believe you would be a great fit for the position. 

Then wrap it all up with a short and sweet conclusion.

Closing out a cover letter can be thought of like any other concluding paragraph, or the end of a term paper. You want to reiterate your main points briefly, and then thank the hiring manager for their time or consideration. 

Swan gives another excellent sample, saying in the closing: 

“Given the opportunity, I can bring significant value to your corporation by utilizing my specific skill sets, work experience, and education. I have enclosed my resume and appreciate the time you have taken to get to know who I am and what I could possibly offer to this already inspiring system.”

Cover letters don’t have to be stressful or ridiculously long. Just remember to stick to some basic formatting like this so you don’t overthink it, and you’ll be a pro just like that!

For more insights on navigating a difficult job market and the top jobs, industries, and cities to pursue right now, check out  LinkedIn’s 2024 Guide to Kickstarting Your Career .

The post Write A Killer Cover Letter In 15 Minutes With This Simple Formula first appeared on Her Campus .

Write A Killer Cover Letter In 15 Minutes With This Simple Formula

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  2. How to Start a Cover Letter with format & Writing Tips

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  5. How to Start a Cover Letter [+ Introduction & Opening Lines]

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  6. How to Start a Cover Letter to Impress Employers [+ 14 Examples

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COMMENTS

  1. 30 Better Ways to Start a Cover Letter

    Communicate that you'll bring something to the company: You'll get more into the details after your opening, of course. But your cover letter opener should still tell the reader, "This person can do something for us ," rather than, "This job would really help them .". Stick to the point: Your opener, while creative, should still be ...

  2. 7 Powerful Ways To Start a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    The headline on the image says, "Cover letter format" A woman sits at a table writing on a piece of paper. There's a simple cover letter represented by lines. On one side of the cover letter, there are labels for the sections of the cover letter. The labels are: 1. Date and contact information 2. Salutation/greeting 3. First, introduce yourself 4.

  3. 12 Ways to Start a Cover Letter: Examples & Tips

    Here are 5 cover letter opening sentence examples to give you some ideas: How to write a cover letter opening line as a recent graduate. Dear Ms. Casey, As a recent graduate of Western Michigan University with a degree in business-oriented chemistry, I was excited to see your listing on Indeed for a Marketing Associate at AMCOL Corp. ...

  4. How to Start a Cover Letter (Examples Included)

    2. Nail the Opening Sentence. Your opening sentence in your cover letter is what really needs to draw the hiring manager in. As a result, you want to make sure that it packs a wallop. Usually, you have a few options that can pull this off. First, if you know someone at the company who referred you to the position, you can try name-dropping.

  5. 5 Perfect Opening Lines for Your Cover Letter

    Here are five ways to write the opening lines of your next cover letter: 1. Job Title & Accomplishments. This is a very common and effective way to start out a cover letter. The idea is to get straight to the point and impress the employer with your background. Use your most impressive and most relevant accomplishment stories to explain your worth.

  6. How To Start a Cover Letter With Examples and Tips

    Personalize Your Cover Letter. What to Write in the Rest of Your Letter. Cover Letter Sample. More Cover Letter Examples and Templates. Photo: Theresa Chiechi / The Balance. Examples of opening sentences to use when writing a cover letter, with tips for how to start and what to include in each part of a cover letter for a job.

  7. How to Start a Cover Letter [+ Introduction Examples]

    Here's a simple-but-powerful cover letter introduction template to use as an example: Dear [First Name], I was excited to come across the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. As a [Current Job Title] with [# of Years] years of experience, I have become competent in [Relevant Skills & Job-Related Abilities].

  8. How to Start a Cover Letter

    Mention a Mutual Contact (if Applicable) Tip #3. Prove You Have Researched The Company Tip #4. Lead With An Achievement Tip #5. Start With a Powerful Belief Tip #6. Be Direct Key Takeaways Related Readings. Share this article. Here you are, looking at a blank document that's supposed to be your cover letter.

  9. Best Ways to Write a Cover Letter Opening With Examples

    Examples of cover letter opening sentences. Here are some opening sentence techniques to consider. Show passion for what you do. Passion drives success, and employers want potential candidates who will advocate for their company. An opening sentence that demonstrates the your passions and motivations for the job will help grab a hiring manager ...

  10. How to Start a Cover Letter to Impress Employers [+ 14 Examples]

    1. Start with humor. Employers are humans too, and they'll often appreciate a good joke, pun, or funny opening line as much as the next person. If done tastefully and respectfully, starting your cover letter off with a joke can be an excellent way to stand out. Plus, a joke can still include a powerful explanation for why you're the right ...

  11. How to Start a Cover Letter That Grabs Attention

    Addressing a cover letter (including an email) Always place the company's name and address just before the greeting. If at all possible, find and include the name of the recruiter or hiring manager. (More on this coming up.) Use the same heading, font type, and font size as your resume to create a feeling of organization and flow.

  12. How to Start a Cover Letter: 7 Great Cover Letter Openings (+Examples

    7. Use humor and creativity. Recruiters are human beings, too (shocking). In a pile of boring resumes and repetitive cover letters and motivation letters , they may find a good joke, juicy pun, or funny opening line a nice refreshing break. It can even be a reason to call you up for an interview.

  13. How to Start a Cover Letter [20+ Opening Line Examples]

    To start a cover letter without a name, use some variation of 'Dear XYZ Team Manager' or 'Dear Hiring Manager'. Never fall back on old-fashioned salutations such as "To Whom it May Concern.'. It's far too cold and impersonal. RIGHT. Dear XYZ Team Hiring Manager.

  14. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Check out this example of an effective cover letter introduction: Example of a good cover letter introduction. Your opening paragraph should encourage the employer to read the rest of your cover letter. Highlight your passion. You can make your introduction even more engaging by adding some personality, or by including a career highlight.

  15. How to Start a Cover Letter (+10 Opening Line Examples)

    Here's an example of a cover letter opening that emphasises passion: Using passion to start your cover letter. I've been fascinated with Middle English ever since laying hands on my first copy of The Canterbury Tales over 15 years ago. Literature is a matchless resource for understanding mediaeval culture, society, and values, and it's a ...

  16. How to start a cover letter (With 7 powerful examples)

    Related: How To Write a Management Cover Letter (With Examples) 6. Tell a creative story. Even though you probably won't be submitting your cover letter to a creative writing contest, don't be afraid to inject some humour, charisma and creativity - as long as it's appropriate for the specific job and company. Hiring managers don't ...

  17. 8 Powerful Ways to Start a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    8 ways to start your cover letter. Here's how you can start a cover letter in eight different ways: Show your enthusiasm. Highlight a mutual connection. Lead with an impressive accomplishment. Explain what you like about the company. Express passion for what you do. Tell a creative story. Include a belief statement.

  18. 30 Opening Sentences to start your Cover Letter

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  19. Cover Letter Opening Sentences to Start Your Cover Letter

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  23. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Impress an Employer

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