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This page – part of our Study Skills section – provides some quick advice about the things you should check before you submit an assessed assignment. 

You don’t have to be a student, however, to find this page useful, perhaps you have been asked to prepare a document for work or socially?

You have, no doubt, devoted a lot of time and effort to producing your work, researching your topic, carefully constructing your arguments or findings and writing it up.  (If not then see our pages: Planning an Essay and Writing an Essay or Writing a Report ). 

Before your work is submitted you should follow the simple framework outlined on this page to ensure that your work is received in the most positive way possible, for students this will ultimately mean better marks and for others it could mean the difference between your work being considered credible or not.

This page covers:

Knowing Your Deadline

Presentation basics, proofreading.

In many academic settings working to a deadline is an important skill you should develop – this also applies in work and other situations.

For some general time management advice for study see our page:  Finding Time to Study .

The key thing here is knowing your deadline and making sure that you submit your work on time.  In many educational establishments you will be marked down for a late submission, you may even fail, simply because you didn’t submit in time. At work missing deadlines can also have serious repercussions.

Aim to finish your main research and writing a few days before the deadline – that way you have time to work on the presentation of your work, re-read and have your work proofread.

You also need to know the procedures involved in physically submitting your work.   Perhaps this is by email or by uploading to a VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) or perhaps you need to print your assignment and submit it in person – or via the mail, as may be the case for a distance-learning course.   If you are submitting electronically make sure that you know what file formats are acceptable.

As a student you may be required to complete some sort of coversheet to accompany your submission.  Make sure that you have one of these to hand and be prepared to sign a declaration to state that your submission is your own work.

Unless you are an art student or a graphic designer you probably don’t need to spend too long working on your presentation.

You may have been given some presentation guidelines, indicating what margins and line spacing to use, for example.  If so you should carefully follow them - don't risk loosing marks because you have formatted your work poorly.

Just as personal presentation is important, especially if going for a job interview, presentation of your writing is important when submitting assignments.   Good presentation creates a good first impression. 

Presentation can make a big difference to the how your work is viewed and how easy it is to read, both for the marker and for you – if you refer to your work in the future.

So rather than just sending off your finished work in any old state - give some thought to its presentation. 

Assignment Presentation Basics

  • Use a suitable font (type-face).  Generally san-serif fonts (like Arial) look best viewed on a screen and fonts with a serif (like Times New Roman ) look better in print.  Pick a standard font - nothing too fancy and definitely not Comic Sans - choose something which is easy to read.
  • Use a sensible point size 11 or 12 are usually best. Small point sizes make the document more difficult to read and large sizes make it look as though you are trying to hide the fact that you haven't written enough!
  • Include page numbers in the footer on all pages.
  • Use 1½ or double line spacing.
  • Use wide margins so that the marker has room for comments.
  • Use bold and italics sparingly and appropriately.
  • Include a title page and/or a table of contents if appropriate.
  • Include your name and/or student number (or other identification) in the header or footer as appropriate.

For the purpose of this page, ‘ re-reading ’ is something you do yourself, whereas ‘ proofreading ’ is something you ask somebody else to do for you.  The aim of both methods is the same – to check your work and eliminate errors.

You should have aimed to have finished the writing stage of your work at least a couple of days before the deadline.  That way, when you re-read it, the topics are still fairly fresh in your mind but you will see what you have written with fresh eyes, making it easier to spot mistakes.

Re-read your work slowly. Your work should read smoothly, be easy to follow, and should ‘make sense’; check that you have said what you meant to say and in as clear a way as possible.  It is not normally appropriate, at this stage, to make serious edits to your work although it may be appropriate to re-order sentences or paragraphs.  It can help to read your work out loud – you are more likely to pick up on grammatical errors that way.

A Thesaurus can be helpful for finding other words with a similar meaning which perhaps may sound better in a particular context, or if you have overused one particular word or phrase.  Remember also that although modern spell-checkers are very good, they are not fool proof. Spell-checkers have limitations and may not pick up words used in a particular context, e.g. ‘there’ and ‘their’, ‘to’ and ‘too’.

See our pages: Spelling , Punctuation , Grammar and Common Writing Mistakes for more guidance.

Make sure all your references are correct and you have included a reference list or bibliography. 

See our page Academic Referencing for more.

Keep Clam and Proofread

If at all possible, get somebody else to read your work before you submit it.

In most cases you will not need a professional proof-reader, somebody who has decent understanding of the language is really all you require.  This could be a friend or partner, or perhaps a work colleague or other student.

Your proof-reader may very well pick up fairly obvious mistakes that you have overlooked.  You may, for example, often misspell particular words - you may not be aware of this but it might be obvious to another reader.  Your proof-reader might also find problems with the flow of your arguments and/or grammatical issues.

Sometimes it can be difficult to accept any sort of criticism at this stage, remember, your proof-reader is doing you a favour.  Listen to their comments – ultimately it will be up to you whether or not you change anything.

See our page: Dealing with Criticism if you're struggling!

Continue to: Reflecting on Marked Work

See also: Effective Reading | Finding Time for Study Sources of Information | What is Theory?

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  • A step-by-step guide to the writing process

The Writing Process | 5 Steps with Examples & Tips

Published on April 24, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on December 8, 2023.

The writing process steps

Good academic writing requires effective planning, drafting, and revision.

The writing process looks different for everyone, but there are five basic steps that will help you structure your time when writing any kind of text.

Receive feedback on language, structure, and formatting

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

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See an example

last stage before submission of an assignment

Table of contents

Step 1: prewriting, step 2: planning and outlining, step 3: writing a first draft, step 4: redrafting and revising, step 5: editing and proofreading, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about the writing process.

Before you start writing, you need to decide exactly what you’ll write about and do the necessary research.

Coming up with a topic

If you have to come up with your own topic for an assignment, think of what you’ve covered in class— is there a particular area that intrigued, interested, or even confused you? Topics that left you with additional questions are perfect, as these are questions you can explore in your writing.

The scope depends on what type of text you’re writing—for example, an essay or a research paper will be less in-depth than a dissertation topic . Don’t pick anything too ambitious to cover within the word count, or too limited for you to find much to say.

Narrow down your idea to a specific argument or question. For example, an appropriate topic for an essay might be narrowed down like this:

Doing the research

Once you know your topic, it’s time to search for relevant sources and gather the information you need. This process varies according to your field of study and the scope of the assignment. It might involve:

  • Searching for primary and secondary sources .
  • Reading the relevant texts closely (e.g. for literary analysis ).
  • Collecting data using relevant research methods (e.g. experiments , interviews or surveys )

From a writing perspective, the important thing is to take plenty of notes while you do the research. Keep track of the titles, authors, publication dates, and relevant quotations from your sources; the data you gathered; and your initial analysis or interpretation of the questions you’re addressing.

Especially in academic writing , it’s important to use a logical structure to convey information effectively. It’s far better to plan this out in advance than to try to work out your structure once you’ve already begun writing.

Creating an essay outline is a useful way to plan out your structure before you start writing. This should help you work out the main ideas you want to focus on and how you’ll organize them. The outline doesn’t have to be final—it’s okay if your structure changes throughout the writing process.

Use bullet points or numbering to make your structure clear at a glance. Even for a short text that won’t use headings, it’s useful to summarize what you’ll discuss in each paragraph.

An outline for a literary analysis essay might look something like this:

  • Describe the theatricality of Austen’s works
  • Outline the role theater plays in Mansfield Park
  • Introduce the research question: How does Austen use theater to express the characters’ morality in Mansfield Park ?
  • Discuss Austen’s depiction of the performance at the end of the first volume
  • Discuss how Sir Bertram reacts to the acting scheme
  • Introduce Austen’s use of stage direction–like details during dialogue
  • Explore how these are deployed to show the characters’ self-absorption
  • Discuss Austen’s description of Maria and Julia’s relationship as polite but affectionless
  • Compare Mrs. Norris’s self-conceit as charitable despite her idleness
  • Summarize the three themes: The acting scheme, stage directions, and the performance of morals
  • Answer the research question
  • Indicate areas for further study

Once you have a clear idea of your structure, it’s time to produce a full first draft.

This process can be quite non-linear. For example, it’s reasonable to begin writing with the main body of the text, saving the introduction for later once you have a clearer idea of the text you’re introducing.

To give structure to your writing, use your outline as a framework. Make sure that each paragraph has a clear central focus that relates to your overall argument.

Hover over the parts of the example, from a literary analysis essay on Mansfield Park , to see how a paragraph is constructed.

The character of Mrs. Norris provides another example of the performance of morals in Mansfield Park . Early in the novel, she is described in scathing terms as one who knows “how to dictate liberality to others: but her love of money was equal to her love of directing” (p. 7). This hypocrisy does not interfere with her self-conceit as “the most liberal-minded sister and aunt in the world” (p. 7). Mrs. Norris is strongly concerned with appearing charitable, but unwilling to make any personal sacrifices to accomplish this. Instead, she stage-manages the charitable actions of others, never acknowledging that her schemes do not put her own time or money on the line. In this way, Austen again shows us a character whose morally upright behavior is fundamentally a performance—for whom the goal of doing good is less important than the goal of seeming good.

When you move onto a different topic, start a new paragraph. Use appropriate transition words and phrases to show the connections between your ideas.

The goal at this stage is to get a draft completed, not to make everything perfect as you go along. Once you have a full draft in front of you, you’ll have a clearer idea of where improvement is needed.

Give yourself a first draft deadline that leaves you a reasonable length of time to revise, edit, and proofread before the final deadline. For a longer text like a dissertation, you and your supervisor might agree on deadlines for individual chapters.

Now it’s time to look critically at your first draft and find potential areas for improvement. Redrafting means substantially adding or removing content, while revising involves making changes to structure and reformulating arguments.

Evaluating the first draft

It can be difficult to look objectively at your own writing. Your perspective might be positively or negatively biased—especially if you try to assess your work shortly after finishing it.

It’s best to leave your work alone for at least a day or two after completing the first draft. Come back after a break to evaluate it with fresh eyes; you’ll spot things you wouldn’t have otherwise.

When evaluating your writing at this stage, you’re mainly looking for larger issues such as changes to your arguments or structure. Starting with bigger concerns saves you time—there’s no point perfecting the grammar of something you end up cutting out anyway.

Right now, you’re looking for:

  • Arguments that are unclear or illogical.
  • Areas where information would be better presented in a different order.
  • Passages where additional information or explanation is needed.
  • Passages that are irrelevant to your overall argument.

For example, in our paper on Mansfield Park , we might realize the argument would be stronger with more direct consideration of the protagonist Fanny Price, and decide to try to find space for this in paragraph IV.

For some assignments, you’ll receive feedback on your first draft from a supervisor or peer. Be sure to pay close attention to what they tell you, as their advice will usually give you a clearer sense of which aspects of your text need improvement.

Redrafting and revising

Once you’ve decided where changes are needed, make the big changes first, as these are likely to have knock-on effects on the rest. Depending on what your text needs, this step might involve:

  • Making changes to your overall argument.
  • Reordering the text.
  • Cutting parts of the text.
  • Adding new text.

You can go back and forth between writing, redrafting and revising several times until you have a final draft that you’re happy with.

Think about what changes you can realistically accomplish in the time you have. If you are running low on time, you don’t want to leave your text in a messy state halfway through redrafting, so make sure to prioritize the most important changes.

Editing focuses on local concerns like clarity and sentence structure. Proofreading involves reading the text closely to remove typos and ensure stylistic consistency. You can check all your drafts and texts in minutes with an AI proofreader .

Editing for grammar and clarity

When editing, you want to ensure your text is clear, concise, and grammatically correct. You’re looking out for:

  • Grammatical errors.
  • Ambiguous phrasings.
  • Redundancy and repetition .

In your initial draft, it’s common to end up with a lot of sentences that are poorly formulated. Look critically at where your meaning could be conveyed in a more effective way or in fewer words, and watch out for common sentence structure mistakes like run-on sentences and sentence fragments:

  • Austen’s style is frequently humorous, her characters are often described as “witty.” Although this is less true of Mansfield Park .
  • Austen’s style is frequently humorous. Her characters are often described as “witty,” although this is less true of Mansfield Park .

To make your sentences run smoothly, you can always use a paraphrasing tool to rewrite them in a clearer way.

Proofreading for small mistakes and typos

When proofreading, first look out for typos in your text:

  • Spelling errors.
  • Missing words.
  • Confused word choices .
  • Punctuation errors .
  • Missing or excess spaces.

Use a grammar checker , but be sure to do another manual check after. Read through your text line by line, watching out for problem areas highlighted by the software but also for any other issues it might have missed.

For example, in the following phrase we notice several errors:

  • Mary Crawfords character is a complicate one and her relationships with Fanny and Edmund undergoes several transformations through out the novel.
  • Mary Crawford’s character is a complicated one, and her relationships with both Fanny and Edmund undergo several transformations throughout the novel.

Proofreading for stylistic consistency

There are several issues in academic writing where you can choose between multiple different standards. For example:

  • Whether you use the serial comma .
  • Whether you use American or British spellings and punctuation (you can use a punctuation checker for this).
  • Where you use numerals vs. words for numbers.
  • How you capitalize your titles and headings.

Unless you’re given specific guidance on these issues, it’s your choice which standards you follow. The important thing is to consistently follow one standard for each issue. For example, don’t use a mixture of American and British spellings in your paper.

Additionally, you will probably be provided with specific guidelines for issues related to format (how your text is presented on the page) and citations (how you acknowledge your sources). Always follow these instructions carefully.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Revising, proofreading, and editing are different stages of the writing process .

  • Revising is making structural and logical changes to your text—reformulating arguments and reordering information.
  • Editing refers to making more local changes to things like sentence structure and phrasing to make sure your meaning is conveyed clearly and concisely.
  • Proofreading involves looking at the text closely, line by line, to spot any typos and issues with consistency and correct them.

Whether you’re publishing a blog, submitting a research paper , or even just writing an important email, there are a few techniques you can use to make sure it’s error-free:

  • Take a break : Set your work aside for at least a few hours so that you can look at it with fresh eyes.
  • Proofread a printout : Staring at a screen for too long can cause fatigue – sit down with a pen and paper to check the final version.
  • Use digital shortcuts : Take note of any recurring mistakes (for example, misspelling a particular word, switching between US and UK English , or inconsistently capitalizing a term), and use Find and Replace to fix it throughout the document.

If you want to be confident that an important text is error-free, it might be worth choosing a professional proofreading service instead.

If you’ve gone over the word limit set for your assignment, shorten your sentences and cut repetition and redundancy during the editing process. If you use a lot of long quotes , consider shortening them to just the essentials.

If you need to remove a lot of words, you may have to cut certain passages. Remember that everything in the text should be there to support your argument; look for any information that’s not essential to your point and remove it.

To make this process easier and faster, you can use a paraphrasing tool . With this tool, you can rewrite your text to make it simpler and shorter. If that’s not enough, you can copy-paste your paraphrased text into the summarizer . This tool will distill your text to its core message.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Understanding Assignments

What this handout is about.

The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one. This handout will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms and practices into meaningful clues to the type of writing your instructor expects. See our short video for more tips.

Basic beginnings

Regardless of the assignment, department, or instructor, adopting these two habits will serve you well :

  • Read the assignment carefully as soon as you receive it. Do not put this task off—reading the assignment at the beginning will save you time, stress, and problems later. An assignment can look pretty straightforward at first, particularly if the instructor has provided lots of information. That does not mean it will not take time and effort to complete; you may even have to learn a new skill to complete the assignment.
  • Ask the instructor about anything you do not understand. Do not hesitate to approach your instructor. Instructors would prefer to set you straight before you hand the paper in. That’s also when you will find their feedback most useful.

Assignment formats

Many assignments follow a basic format. Assignments often begin with an overview of the topic, include a central verb or verbs that describe the task, and offer some additional suggestions, questions, or prompts to get you started.

An Overview of Some Kind

The instructor might set the stage with some general discussion of the subject of the assignment, introduce the topic, or remind you of something pertinent that you have discussed in class. For example:

“Throughout history, gerbils have played a key role in politics,” or “In the last few weeks of class, we have focused on the evening wear of the housefly …”

The Task of the Assignment

Pay attention; this part tells you what to do when you write the paper. Look for the key verb or verbs in the sentence. Words like analyze, summarize, or compare direct you to think about your topic in a certain way. Also pay attention to words such as how, what, when, where, and why; these words guide your attention toward specific information. (See the section in this handout titled “Key Terms” for more information.)

“Analyze the effect that gerbils had on the Russian Revolution”, or “Suggest an interpretation of housefly undergarments that differs from Darwin’s.”

Additional Material to Think about

Here you will find some questions to use as springboards as you begin to think about the topic. Instructors usually include these questions as suggestions rather than requirements. Do not feel compelled to answer every question unless the instructor asks you to do so. Pay attention to the order of the questions. Sometimes they suggest the thinking process your instructor imagines you will need to follow to begin thinking about the topic.

“You may wish to consider the differing views held by Communist gerbils vs. Monarchist gerbils, or Can there be such a thing as ‘the housefly garment industry’ or is it just a home-based craft?”

These are the instructor’s comments about writing expectations:

“Be concise”, “Write effectively”, or “Argue furiously.”

Technical Details

These instructions usually indicate format rules or guidelines.

“Your paper must be typed in Palatino font on gray paper and must not exceed 600 pages. It is due on the anniversary of Mao Tse-tung’s death.”

The assignment’s parts may not appear in exactly this order, and each part may be very long or really short. Nonetheless, being aware of this standard pattern can help you understand what your instructor wants you to do.

Interpreting the assignment

Ask yourself a few basic questions as you read and jot down the answers on the assignment sheet:

Why did your instructor ask you to do this particular task?

Who is your audience.

  • What kind of evidence do you need to support your ideas?

What kind of writing style is acceptable?

  • What are the absolute rules of the paper?

Try to look at the question from the point of view of the instructor. Recognize that your instructor has a reason for giving you this assignment and for giving it to you at a particular point in the semester. In every assignment, the instructor has a challenge for you. This challenge could be anything from demonstrating an ability to think clearly to demonstrating an ability to use the library. See the assignment not as a vague suggestion of what to do but as an opportunity to show that you can handle the course material as directed. Paper assignments give you more than a topic to discuss—they ask you to do something with the topic. Keep reminding yourself of that. Be careful to avoid the other extreme as well: do not read more into the assignment than what is there.

Of course, your instructor has given you an assignment so that he or she will be able to assess your understanding of the course material and give you an appropriate grade. But there is more to it than that. Your instructor has tried to design a learning experience of some kind. Your instructor wants you to think about something in a particular way for a particular reason. If you read the course description at the beginning of your syllabus, review the assigned readings, and consider the assignment itself, you may begin to see the plan, purpose, or approach to the subject matter that your instructor has created for you. If you still aren’t sure of the assignment’s goals, try asking the instructor. For help with this, see our handout on getting feedback .

Given your instructor’s efforts, it helps to answer the question: What is my purpose in completing this assignment? Is it to gather research from a variety of outside sources and present a coherent picture? Is it to take material I have been learning in class and apply it to a new situation? Is it to prove a point one way or another? Key words from the assignment can help you figure this out. Look for key terms in the form of active verbs that tell you what to do.

Key Terms: Finding Those Active Verbs

Here are some common key words and definitions to help you think about assignment terms:

Information words Ask you to demonstrate what you know about the subject, such as who, what, when, where, how, and why.

  • define —give the subject’s meaning (according to someone or something). Sometimes you have to give more than one view on the subject’s meaning
  • describe —provide details about the subject by answering question words (such as who, what, when, where, how, and why); you might also give details related to the five senses (what you see, hear, feel, taste, and smell)
  • explain —give reasons why or examples of how something happened
  • illustrate —give descriptive examples of the subject and show how each is connected with the subject
  • summarize —briefly list the important ideas you learned about the subject
  • trace —outline how something has changed or developed from an earlier time to its current form
  • research —gather material from outside sources about the subject, often with the implication or requirement that you will analyze what you have found

Relation words Ask you to demonstrate how things are connected.

  • compare —show how two or more things are similar (and, sometimes, different)
  • contrast —show how two or more things are dissimilar
  • apply—use details that you’ve been given to demonstrate how an idea, theory, or concept works in a particular situation
  • cause —show how one event or series of events made something else happen
  • relate —show or describe the connections between things

Interpretation words Ask you to defend ideas of your own about the subject. Do not see these words as requesting opinion alone (unless the assignment specifically says so), but as requiring opinion that is supported by concrete evidence. Remember examples, principles, definitions, or concepts from class or research and use them in your interpretation.

  • assess —summarize your opinion of the subject and measure it against something
  • prove, justify —give reasons or examples to demonstrate how or why something is the truth
  • evaluate, respond —state your opinion of the subject as good, bad, or some combination of the two, with examples and reasons
  • support —give reasons or evidence for something you believe (be sure to state clearly what it is that you believe)
  • synthesize —put two or more things together that have not been put together in class or in your readings before; do not just summarize one and then the other and say that they are similar or different—you must provide a reason for putting them together that runs all the way through the paper
  • analyze —determine how individual parts create or relate to the whole, figure out how something works, what it might mean, or why it is important
  • argue —take a side and defend it with evidence against the other side

More Clues to Your Purpose As you read the assignment, think about what the teacher does in class:

  • What kinds of textbooks or coursepack did your instructor choose for the course—ones that provide background information, explain theories or perspectives, or argue a point of view?
  • In lecture, does your instructor ask your opinion, try to prove her point of view, or use keywords that show up again in the assignment?
  • What kinds of assignments are typical in this discipline? Social science classes often expect more research. Humanities classes thrive on interpretation and analysis.
  • How do the assignments, readings, and lectures work together in the course? Instructors spend time designing courses, sometimes even arguing with their peers about the most effective course materials. Figuring out the overall design to the course will help you understand what each assignment is meant to achieve.

Now, what about your reader? Most undergraduates think of their audience as the instructor. True, your instructor is a good person to keep in mind as you write. But for the purposes of a good paper, think of your audience as someone like your roommate: smart enough to understand a clear, logical argument, but not someone who already knows exactly what is going on in your particular paper. Remember, even if the instructor knows everything there is to know about your paper topic, he or she still has to read your paper and assess your understanding. In other words, teach the material to your reader.

Aiming a paper at your audience happens in two ways: you make decisions about the tone and the level of information you want to convey.

  • Tone means the “voice” of your paper. Should you be chatty, formal, or objective? Usually you will find some happy medium—you do not want to alienate your reader by sounding condescending or superior, but you do not want to, um, like, totally wig on the man, you know? Eschew ostentatious erudition: some students think the way to sound academic is to use big words. Be careful—you can sound ridiculous, especially if you use the wrong big words.
  • The level of information you use depends on who you think your audience is. If you imagine your audience as your instructor and she already knows everything you have to say, you may find yourself leaving out key information that can cause your argument to be unconvincing and illogical. But you do not have to explain every single word or issue. If you are telling your roommate what happened on your favorite science fiction TV show last night, you do not say, “First a dark-haired white man of average height, wearing a suit and carrying a flashlight, walked into the room. Then a purple alien with fifteen arms and at least three eyes turned around. Then the man smiled slightly. In the background, you could hear a clock ticking. The room was fairly dark and had at least two windows that I saw.” You also do not say, “This guy found some aliens. The end.” Find some balance of useful details that support your main point.

You’ll find a much more detailed discussion of these concepts in our handout on audience .

The Grim Truth

With a few exceptions (including some lab and ethnography reports), you are probably being asked to make an argument. You must convince your audience. It is easy to forget this aim when you are researching and writing; as you become involved in your subject matter, you may become enmeshed in the details and focus on learning or simply telling the information you have found. You need to do more than just repeat what you have read. Your writing should have a point, and you should be able to say it in a sentence. Sometimes instructors call this sentence a “thesis” or a “claim.”

So, if your instructor tells you to write about some aspect of oral hygiene, you do not want to just list: “First, you brush your teeth with a soft brush and some peanut butter. Then, you floss with unwaxed, bologna-flavored string. Finally, gargle with bourbon.” Instead, you could say, “Of all the oral cleaning methods, sandblasting removes the most plaque. Therefore it should be recommended by the American Dental Association.” Or, “From an aesthetic perspective, moldy teeth can be quite charming. However, their joys are short-lived.”

Convincing the reader of your argument is the goal of academic writing. It doesn’t have to say “argument” anywhere in the assignment for you to need one. Look at the assignment and think about what kind of argument you could make about it instead of just seeing it as a checklist of information you have to present. For help with understanding the role of argument in academic writing, see our handout on argument .

What kind of evidence do you need?

There are many kinds of evidence, and what type of evidence will work for your assignment can depend on several factors–the discipline, the parameters of the assignment, and your instructor’s preference. Should you use statistics? Historical examples? Do you need to conduct your own experiment? Can you rely on personal experience? See our handout on evidence for suggestions on how to use evidence appropriately.

Make sure you are clear about this part of the assignment, because your use of evidence will be crucial in writing a successful paper. You are not just learning how to argue; you are learning how to argue with specific types of materials and ideas. Ask your instructor what counts as acceptable evidence. You can also ask a librarian for help. No matter what kind of evidence you use, be sure to cite it correctly—see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial .

You cannot always tell from the assignment just what sort of writing style your instructor expects. The instructor may be really laid back in class but still expect you to sound formal in writing. Or the instructor may be fairly formal in class and ask you to write a reflection paper where you need to use “I” and speak from your own experience.

Try to avoid false associations of a particular field with a style (“art historians like wacky creativity,” or “political scientists are boring and just give facts”) and look instead to the types of readings you have been given in class. No one expects you to write like Plato—just use the readings as a guide for what is standard or preferable to your instructor. When in doubt, ask your instructor about the level of formality she or he expects.

No matter what field you are writing for or what facts you are including, if you do not write so that your reader can understand your main idea, you have wasted your time. So make clarity your main goal. For specific help with style, see our handout on style .

Technical details about the assignment

The technical information you are given in an assignment always seems like the easy part. This section can actually give you lots of little hints about approaching the task. Find out if elements such as page length and citation format (see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial ) are negotiable. Some professors do not have strong preferences as long as you are consistent and fully answer the assignment. Some professors are very specific and will deduct big points for deviations.

Usually, the page length tells you something important: The instructor thinks the size of the paper is appropriate to the assignment’s parameters. In plain English, your instructor is telling you how many pages it should take for you to answer the question as fully as you are expected to. So if an assignment is two pages long, you cannot pad your paper with examples or reword your main idea several times. Hit your one point early, defend it with the clearest example, and finish quickly. If an assignment is ten pages long, you can be more complex in your main points and examples—and if you can only produce five pages for that assignment, you need to see someone for help—as soon as possible.

Tricks that don’t work

Your instructors are not fooled when you:

  • spend more time on the cover page than the essay —graphics, cool binders, and cute titles are no replacement for a well-written paper.
  • use huge fonts, wide margins, or extra spacing to pad the page length —these tricks are immediately obvious to the eye. Most instructors use the same word processor you do. They know what’s possible. Such tactics are especially damning when the instructor has a stack of 60 papers to grade and yours is the only one that low-flying airplane pilots could read.
  • use a paper from another class that covered “sort of similar” material . Again, the instructor has a particular task for you to fulfill in the assignment that usually relates to course material and lectures. Your other paper may not cover this material, and turning in the same paper for more than one course may constitute an Honor Code violation . Ask the instructor—it can’t hurt.
  • get all wacky and “creative” before you answer the question . Showing that you are able to think beyond the boundaries of a simple assignment can be good, but you must do what the assignment calls for first. Again, check with your instructor. A humorous tone can be refreshing for someone grading a stack of papers, but it will not get you a good grade if you have not fulfilled the task.

Critical reading of assignments leads to skills in other types of reading and writing. If you get good at figuring out what the real goals of assignments are, you are going to be better at understanding the goals of all of your classes and fields of study.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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EssayCorp

7 Points to be Considered Before Submitting The Assignment

7 Points to be Considered Before Submitting The Assignment

  • Emily Scott

Learning is considered the most significant task for students in building a personality. They go through the vast majority of their days getting done with academic projects and assignments.

Studies tend to assume essential jobs in your evaluation, whether at university, college, or school. College students centre on embellishment their life toward the path to get any benefits . Assignments are crucial as they uphold a significant contribution or a portion of a student's yearly grades.

When you study in school or college, there are plenty of assignments students must deal with. They must exceed expectations in classes, at home, and in other extra-curricular exercises.

The simple explanation for the motivation behind assignments is to improve the learning aptitudes of college and university students. In such a case that the scholars think carefully, it is more possibilities they can find out additional.

Academic assignments improve students' innovativeness as they become significantly more familiar with them when they practice or read something alone. So the essential explanation of giving assignment homework is to provide a training presentation and information upgrade on a subject.

We must agree that assignments play the most critical role in shaping a student's yearly performance.

What goes wrong with assignment submission?

As we all know, assignments are crucial academic tasks for a student. No one wants to spare a loose end to it. A student tends to put all the effort into their assignment writing and still needs to yield top grades.

What could be the reason? Have you ever thought about the reason behind such a scenario? If you not, we will let you know.

Assignment writing is an enormous project which can extend beyond good writing only. It also has many elements that need to be taken care of. Most students make several mistakes and need to pay more attention to them before the final submission.

You read that right; students must consider many essential points before submitting their academic assignments. This blog will inform you about important issues you should consider before submitting.

Points to consider before making the final submission

The students must appropriately evaluate many factors and essential points before hitting that submit button. Here we have discussed such significant issues to consider. Have a look.

Grammar and sentence formation – The most important thing to watch out for before submitting the assignment is to check the grammar. Grammatical errors can ruin your assignment quality at once, and you will score lower grades.

So to get good grades, always spare quality time to rectify these grammar mistakes. Never overlook any spelling or sentence structure errors in your assignment.

Never use slang – Ensure you haven't used any informal writing style before submitting your academic project. Jargon and slang are known to be everyday pieces of writing. Using such elements can degrade your work.

Always try to use the formal and academic style of paper to score better grades on your assignments. However, most students skip this step and jump on direct submission, which costs them later.

Keep a check on word count – Always remember that all the universities and colleges have a particular word count for every academic assignment. It depends upon its topic or concept.

It has been observed that many students never bother to check their word count in jobs. It tends to impact the quality of their work, and they need better grades. Universities measure the assignment performance of a student on this standard as well.

So it is advisable always to keep an eye open for the length. And the total word count of your assignment before submission. However, students can use online tools to check the total number of words written by them in their work. There are many tools available online for this.

Pictures – Many scholars and students enter the subject in the Google Images search bar. They hit enter and paste the image into their document. In any case, there is something that they don't check for – the copyright.

At any point you open the picture, there is constantly a disclaimer composed underneath that says the image might be copyrighted. Subsequently, you should consistently ensure that the photo you are utilizing is not secured by copyright.

One should take earlier consent from the proprietor before using the picture. Pictures can also be plagiarized, which is unacceptable in many universities and colleges.

In your task, check if you have utilized any copyrighted images. On the off chance that you have, take the consent of the initial creator and give the credits. Try not to distribute the picture in your project to avoid copyright encroachment.

Always check the referencing style – All universities prescribe their particular referencing type, which the students should follow. Referencing holds a crucial place when it comes to academic assignment writing.

Students are advised to check their referencing style before making the final submission of the assignment. Check whether your reference and referencing style is according to the rules. Check them and guarantee your insight on that referencing style is cutting-edge.

Check the marking criteria – See the rules and guidelines repeatedly and ensure that checking zones are accurately kept up. Paper position, the technique utilized, tables arranged, and so on are portions of stamping territories.

Follow the rules right now. Never miss the point. If you still need to include something, you must change the task. It should always be considered if you want to score decent grades in an academic assignment.

Postscript – You can't clarify numerous things in the appropriate response document, yet you must educate the reader about the equivalent. Likewise, you can't now and then incorporate each progression of the estimations you performed, making the reader wonder.

Some appendices need to make the most of the word for such cases. Utilizing this, you can give the moment data to the ultimate reader. It should clarify everything you couldn't in principle arrangement due to the word check.

Continuously watch that the task doesn't have any missing data. If you are skirting a few stages, ensure it is clarified in an index toward finishing the job. It additionally will fulfill your teacher.

To sum up, these points helps a student in writing a perfect assignment. Check these vital points and elements before submitting your assignment. It will help you improvise your work and gain positive results.

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NCI LIBRARY

Academic writing skills guide: planning your assignments.

  • Key Features of Academic Writing
  • The Writing Process
  • Understanding Assignments
  • Brainstorming Techniques
  • Planning Your Assignments
  • Thesis Statements
  • Writing Drafts
  • Structuring Your Assignment
  • How to Deal With Writer's Block
  • Using Paragraphs
  • Conclusions
  • Introductions
  • Revising & Editing
  • Proofreading
  • Grammar & Punctuation
  • Reporting Verbs
  • Signposting, Transitions & Linking Words/Phrases
  • Using Lecturers' Feedback

There may be a temptation to skip the planning stage, especially when deadlines are approaching and you are keen to get on with researching but planning has multiple benefits.

  • Make a rough outline plan - the plan begins with your own interpretation of the question; this initial plan helps you order your ideas and focus your reading
  • If you really know nothing at all about the topic, some initial skimming and browsing through recommended readings or your lecturer’s course material can provide a few ideas.
  • Once you have an initial plan, further familiarise yourself with all relevant module content and sources posted on your Moodle page. These resources have been specifically chosen by your lecturer to help you with your coursework so using these will help you refine your plan and make writing your assignment easier.

Before you start searching the library for resources or information, you need to have some idea of what you are looking for - note down all the questions you can think of that might relate to your assignment title and criteria and list some keywords around the topic you need to research. By taking time to properly understand the assignment title or question and brainstorming for initial ideas, it can help you make informed decisions about what you need to read for a particular assignment.

In this way, you can decide what information you need and then start gathering it. If left unplanned, the reading stage can swallow up huge amounts of time. Making intelligent decisions, based on your initial planning, about which sources to target, can help you to avoid spending time reading less relevant, inappropriate, or even completely irrelevant material. You will be much more efficient in your reading and your research if you have some idea of where your argument is headed. You can then search for evidence for the points in your tentative plan while you are reading and researching

last stage before submission of an assignment

Communications from the Library:  Please note all communications from the library, concerning renewal of books, overdue books and reservations will be sent to your NCI student email account.

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  • Next: Beginning Your Writing >>
  • Last Updated: Dec 15, 2023 10:00 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.ncirl.ie/academic_writing_skills

University of Derby

Preparing for Academic Writing

  • Understanding the Question
  • Planning Your Assignment Timeline
  • Outlining Your Essay
  • Video Playlist
  • Audio Playlist
  • Downloadable Resources
  • Further Reading
  • Relevant Workshops This link opens in a new window
  • Introduction
  • Guiding Principles for an Assignment Timeline
  • Backwards Planning

After you have gained an understanding of your assignment by analysing the information given to you, it is advised that you create an assignment timeline. Creating an assignment timeline can help increase your certainty and clarity over what you need to do and when.   

Use the tabs to learn more about how you can plan your assignment timeline.

You may feel that it is difficult to create a timeline this early into your assignment, or that it is hard to accurately predict exactly how long each step will take. These feelings should be considered when making a plan. First you should note that your initial attempt to plan is educated guesswork.   You are simply considering what steps you think you need to take and how long they should be. As you progress through your assignment timeline you can review your plan and update the timeline to be more accurate.

Inevitably some things may take shorter or longer than you had initially planned. If you are progressing quickly that is good news as you have some extra time that could be spent on your assignment or on something else of your choosing. However, do make sure that you are confident that you have met the required marking criteria within the step if you are moving quicker than planned. If things are taking longer than planned, consider how you will adjust your timings and steps to ensure that your work can be handed in on time. If this is not possible consider if you could apply for extra time through the Late Submission Request Procedure or the Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances Procedure   .

When creating your initial plan, it may be wise to plan some leeway into your schedule. A good rule of thumb would be to plan extra time in each step. So if you expect research would take you two weeks, plan three weeks to complete it in. If it takes the normal amount of time, you have an extra week. If it takes longer then you are prepared. Another method of creating leeway is to aim to beat your deadline by submitting one week in advance. 

During your studies you will often be working towards multiple assignments at once, alongside other deadlines (such as applications) and any responsibilities (work, caring, childcare etc.). When planning your assignment you should take into account that your assignment may not be your only focus. For more information on completing multiple assignments see our academic writing is assessment season livestream .

You may find it easier to plan your assignment by starting from your deadline (or your personal deadline if you are aiming to submit in advance), and working backwards to the start of your assignment. If you attribute estimated times to each step you can establish when you realistically need to start. Backwards planning allows you to consider the whole process, so that you allow crucial time for referencing and proofreading. Proofreading, for example, is an opportunity to evaluate if you have hit the marking criteria, and then to make any necessary actions (such as further reading or rewriting a paragraph). If this step is undervalued in planning then you may find flaws in your work but not have the time to fix them.

If you would like to know more about how to time manage or how to motivate yourself throughout your academic writing timeline, see our Improving Marks in Academic Writing Guide.

In this episode of the Assignment Journey Podcast Alex and Diana (Skills Graduate Placement), discuss how you can use your understanding of the assignment to structure your assignment. They go through what is expected in an introduction, main body and conclusion of an essay as well as a simple paragraph structure.

Managing time over the course

In this video from the Time Management workshop, Naomi from the Skills Team discusses how you can manage your time over the course of a semester through backwards planning.

Academic writing in assessment

In this hour long livestream, Alexander and Naomi discuss their advice for thriving in assessment season, including how you can time manage during this tricky period and how to manage multiple assessments at once whilst looking out for your mental health. 

Structure and Planning

  • << Previous: Understanding the Question
  • Next: Outlining Your Essay >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 5, 2024 11:40 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.derby.ac.uk/preparing-for-academic-writing

How strict should you be? A guide to assignment due dates.

last stage before submission of an assignment

Colleges typically require instructors to include a calendar of assignment due dates in every course syllabus. But most syllabi also include a disclaimer that assignment deadlines are subject to change.  

So, how flexible should deadlines really be in a college course? 

Be Flexible, or be Rigid, but Always be Consistent 

Be consistent in your approach to deadline flexibility, whether you never accept late work or are always willing to make an exception. Nothing irritates strong students more than their instructor announcing, “Since so many of you asked for more time on the assignment that was due today, I’m extending its deadline to next week.”  

Syllabi should always include a clearly stated policy about the circumstances under which late work might be accepted, if at all.  

But should this policy be applied equally to low-stakes and high-stakes assignments? 

Low-Stakes Assessments  

If a course has many low-stakes assessments, like quizzes or homework problems, those assignments are usually due on the same day each week.  

For example, if class meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays, there might a reading quiz due every Monday, to ensure that students are prepared for the week’s in-class discussions, and a homework problem due every Friday, to verify understanding of the week’s concepts. 

Here are three solid approaches to deadline flexibility for low-stakes assessments: 

1. Not flexible: Late work is never accepted  

If a student misses a deadline, they receive zero points on that assignment. 

This approach works best in courses that have many low-stakes assignments, such as reading quizzes on every textbook chapter, where missing one or two deadlines will not jeopardize a student’s understanding of the core concepts nor greatly impact their final letter grade. 

2. Somewhat flexible: Late work is accepted, at a penalty  

If a student misses a deadline, they can submit the assignment late, but their score will be penalized a specified amount (e.g. -5 points). 

This approach works best in courses where content acquisition is scaffolded such that missing one assignment will negatively impact a student’s understanding of core concepts and successful completion of future assignments. In this case, students who miss deadlines should be permitted to complete the missed assignments, but with a small scoring penalty to encourage on-time submissions in future weeks. 

3. Very flexible: Late work is made up, with instructor permission 

If a student misses a deadline, they must contact the instructor and arrange an alternate way to complete the assignment (e.g. by taking a make-up quiz during the instructor’s office hours). 

This approach works best in courses where low-stakes assessments are considered part of a student’s participation grade. In this case, missing a deadline is like missing a class meeting. Students should be encouraged to initiate contact with the instructor to arrange a way to verify their understanding of the missed assignment’s concepts.  

High-Stakes Assessments  

Every course has one or more high-stakes assessments, such as exams or research papers. These assessments are weighted more heavily (worth more of the overall course grade) than lower-stakes assessments because these are higher-level demonstrations of students’ proficiency in the course outcomes. Failure to successfully complete high-stakes assessments generally leads to failure of the entire course. 

What kind of flexibility is appropriate then for key, high-stakes course assessments? 

1. Not flexible: Deadlines do not change, under any circumstances  

If a student misses a deadline, they receive zero points on that assessment. 

This is the most common approach to deadlines for high-stakes assessments. It is rare for a college instructor to permit students to make up a missed midterm or final exam because students making up an exam would receive the unfair advantage of more time to prepare for the exam. Also, many final exams are scheduled for the very end of term, when there is no time remaining for make-up testing before instructors must report course grades to the college. 

2. Somewhat flexible: Deadlines are extended, at a penalty 

If a student misses a deadline, they can submit the assessment late, but their score will be penalized a specified amount (e.g. one letter grade per day). 

This approach is more common for midterm assessments, or for courses with single high-stakes assessments, such as a research paper that students work on throughout the term. If students who miss the deadline for a high-stakes assessment can still submit their work, but their score is heavily penalized, the course grades will accurately reflect the students’ term-long proficiency in the course outcomes. For example, a student who earned “A” scores all term but submitted their final paper one day late could still finish the course with a “B” grade. 

Remember, flexibility around assignments should be geared towards what makes sense in your course and for your students. While there are a lot of possible variations in regards to policy, the most critical element is to be clear and upfront with your students early in the term. This will help avoid confusion and complaints – and help you keep your sanity at the end of the term when students come looking for extra chances to make up missed work! 

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last stage before submission of an assignment

  • My Preferences
  • My Reading List
  • Study Guides
  • Preparing the Final Draft
  • Quiz: Steps in Writing
  • Types of Writing
  • Quiz: Types of Writing
  • Understanding Your Assignment
  • Understanding Your Audience
  • Quiz: Understanding Your Audience
  • Steps in Writing
  • Guidelines for Choosing a Topic
  • Quiz: Guidelines for Choosing a Topic
  • Avoiding Fallacies
  • Quiz: Avoiding Fallacies
  • Identifying the Main Idea
  • Finding Examples and Evidence
  • Quiz: Finding Examples and Evidence
  • The Importance of Specific Details
  • Quiz: The Importance of Specific Details
  • The Writing Assignment
  • Getting Started with Your Research Paper
  • Quiz: The Writing Assignment
  • Writing: Knowing Where to Begin
  • Quiz: Working From a Thesis Statement
  • Quiz: Outlines
  • Getting Started
  • Introductions
  • Quiz: Introductions
  • Working from a Thesis Statement
  • Quiz: Paragraphs
  • Conclusions
  • Quiz: Conclusions
  • Quiz: Titles
  • Reviewing the First Draft
  • Quiz: Preparing the Final Draft
  • Checklists for Improving Your First Draft
  • Getting Started with Revising and Editing
  • Quiz: Checklists for Improving Your First Draft
  • Writing Quizzes

You may be able to move directly from your revised first draft to a final draft, but careful writers often prepare several drafts before they are satisfied with a piece. As you rewrite, you may continue to discover wordy constructions, poor connections, awkward sentences, and other issues.

Writing and editing a draft

While you can quickly handwrite research notes or an outline for your paper, you may want to use a computer to produce a first draft that's legible and easy to edit. You can do much of your editing directly on the screen. If you think of a better way to say what you've just said, make the change immediately and move on. For more global editing, however, many writers like to print out sections or complete drafts, mark them up by hand, and then go back to the computer to input the changes. This method has advantages. Working on the screen limits you to a small section of text. Scrolling up and down in a long, complex document can be confusing. Another advantage of printing out your essay is that it forces you to slow down and read carefully. Because most of us can type quickly on a computer, our fingers may get ahead of our thoughts. Remember that good writing requires deliberation, evaluation, and judgment.

Spell-check, grammar-check, and search-and-replace functions

A spell‐check function is useful for catching misspelled words, typos, and accidental repetitions ( the the ). But the spell‐checker won't flag a word that is actually a word, even if it isn't the one you intended — for example, if you inadvertently type form for from . Spell‐checking also doesn't distinguish between words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings ( it's/its, here/hear, their/they're/there ). Use the spell‐checker as an aid, not as a replacement for your own careful proofreading.

Grammar‐ or style‐checkers require even more caution, because grammar and style are less clear‐cut than spelling. Many writers don't use these functions at all, and unless you already have a good grasp of grammar, these functions can be misleading. For example, grammar‐checkers may catch pronoun agreement and reference errors, but not dangling participles or faulty parallelism. Some grammar‐checkers flag possible usage problems and passive constructions, but they also flag every sentence beginning with a conjunction ( for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so ). The checker may also flag contractions and every sentence ending with a preposition — “errors” that current usage permits. If you use your computer's grammar‐check function, do so critically.

A search‐and‐replace function lets you correct a particular error throughout your paper automatically. However, use caution with the Replace All command, or you could replace one error with another. It's a good idea to evaluate every instance of a misspelled word rather than using the automatic, Replace All command.

Final draft and layout

You can use your computer's word‐processing and layout functions to produce a professional‐looking final draft. If you are doing an assignment for a course, be sure to check with the instructor regarding the format requirements for your paper. For example, your instructor may require the following format: Times New Roman 12‐point type, double‐spaced text, 1‐inch margins, a title page, inserted page numbers, and running heads. The computer's page‐layout functions can help you create a properly formatted paper that meets specific requirements—MLA and APA style, for example.

If it's appropriate, you can present some information in tables, charts, or graphs, and you can import graphics. Be careful not to overdo graphics, varied type fonts, colors, design elements, and formatting. Don't confuse a good‐looking paper with a well‐written one. Although some readers may be initially impressed with a document that looks nice, special formatting and design features can't compensate for poorly expressed ideas. Many readers are distracted by too much formatting—boldface, italic type, bullets, and similar elements.

Previous Reviewing the First Draft

Next Quiz: Preparing the Final Draft

  • Online Quizzes for CliffsNotes Writing: Grammar, Usage, and Style Quick Review, 3rd Edition

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uspto.gov

  • Patent Laws, Regulations, Policies & Procedures
  • Manual of Patent Examining Procedure
  • Chapter 0300
  • Section 302

302 Recording of Assignment Documents [R-07.2015]

37 cfr 3.11  documents which will be recorded..

  • (a) Assignments of applications, patents, and registrations, and other documents relating to interests in patent applications and patents, accompanied by completed cover sheets as specified in § 3.28 and § 3.31 , will be recorded in the Office. Other documents, accompanied by completed cover sheets as specified in § 3.28 and § 3.31 , affecting title to applications, patents, or registrations, will be recorded as provided in this part or at the discretion of the Director.
  • (b) Executive Order 9424 of February 18, 1944 (9 FR 1959, 3 CFR 1943-1948 Comp., p. 303) requires the several departments and other executive agencies of the Government, including Government-owned or Government-controlled corporations, to forward promptly to the Director for recording all licenses, assignments, or other interests of the Government in or under patents or patent applications. Assignments and other documents affecting title to patents or patent applications and documents not affecting title to patents or patent applications required by Executive Order 9424 to be filed will be recorded as provided in this part.
  • (c) A joint research agreement or an excerpt of a joint research agreement will also be recorded as provided in this part.

37 CFR 3.58  Governmental registers.

  • (a) The Office will maintain a Departmental Register to record governmental interests required to be recorded by Executive Order 9424. This Departmental Register will not be open to public inspection but will be available for examination and inspection by duly authorized representatives of the Government. Governmental interests recorded on the Departmental Register will be available for public inspection as provided in § 1.12 .
  • (b) The Office will maintain a Secret Register to record governmental interests required to be recorded by Executive Order 9424. Any instrument to be recorded will be placed on this Secret Register at the request of the department or agency submitting the same. No information will be given concerning any instrument in such record or register, and no examination or inspection thereof or of the index thereto will be permitted, except on the written authority of the head of the department or agency which submitted the instrument and requested secrecy, and the approval of such authority by the Director. No instrument or record other than the one specified may be examined, and the examination must take place in the presence of a designated official of the Patent and Trademark Office. When the department or agency which submitted an instrument no longer requires secrecy with respect to that instrument, it must be recorded anew in the Departmental Register.

37 CFR Part 3 sets forth Office rules on recording assignments and other documents relating to interests in patent applications and patents and the rights of an assignee.

37 CFR 3.11(c) provides that the Office will record a joint research agreement or an excerpt of a joint research agreement.

302.01 Assignment Document Must Be Copy for Recording [R-08.2012]

37 cfr 3.24  requirements for documents and cover sheets relating to patents and patent applications..

  • (a) For electronic submissions: Either a copy of the original document or an extract of the original document may be submitted for recording. All documents must be submitted as digitized images in Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) or another form as prescribed by the Director. When printed to a paper size of either 21.6 by 27.9 cm (8 1/2 inches by 11 inches) or 21.0 by 29.7 cm (DIN size A4), the document must be legible and a 2.5 cm (one-inch) margin must be present on all sides.
  • (b) For paper or facsimile submissions: Either a copy of the original document or an extract of the original document must be submitted for recording. Only one side of each page may be used. The paper size must be either 21.6 by 27.9 cm (8 1/2 inches by 11 inches) or 21.0 by 29.7 cm (DIN size A4), and in either case, a 2.5 cm (one-inch) margin must be present on all sides. For paper submissions, the paper used should be flexible, strong white, non-shiny, and durable. The Office will not return recorded documents, so original documents must not be submitted for recording.

The United States Patent and Trademark Office will accept and record only a copy of an original assignment or other document. See MPEP § 317 . The document submitted for recordation will not be returned to the submitter. If the copy submitted for recordation is illegible, the recorded document will be illegible. Accordingly, applicants and patent owners should ensure that only a legible copy is submitted for recordation.

302.02 Translation of Assignment Document [R-08.2012]

37 cfr 3.26  english language requirement..

The Office will accept and record non-English language documents only if accompanied by an English translation signed by the individual making the translation.

The assignment document, if not in the English language, will not be recorded unless accompanied by an English translation signed by the translator.

302.03 Identifying Patent or Application [R-07.2015]

37 cfr 3.21  identification of patents and patent applications..

An assignment relating to a patent must identify the patent by the patent number. An assignment relating to a national patent application must identify the national patent application by the application number (consisting of the series code and the serial number; e.g., 07/123,456). An assignment relating to an international patent application which designates the United States of America must identify the international application by the international application number; e.g., PCT/US2012/012345. An assignment relating to an international design application which designates the United States of America must identify the international design application by the international registration number or by the U.S. application number assigned to the international design application. If an assignment of a patent application filed under § 1.53(b) of this chapter is executed concurrently with, or subsequent to, the execution of the patent application, but before the patent application is filed, it must identify the patent application by the name of each inventor and the title of the invention so that there can be no mistake as to the patent application intended. If an assignment of a provisional application under § 1.53(c) of this chapter is executed before the provisional application is filed, it must identify the provisional application by the name of each inventor and the title of the invention so that there can be no mistake as to the provisional application intended.

The patent or patent application to which an assignment relates must be identified by patent number or application number unless the assignment is executed concurrently with or subsequent to the execution of the application but before the application is filed. Then, the application must be identified by the name(s) of the inventors, and the title of the invention. If an assignment of a provisional application is executed before the provisional application is filed, it must identify the provisional application by name(s) of the inventors and the title of the invention.

The Office makes every effort to provide applicants with the application numbers for newly filed patent applications as soon as possible. It is suggested, however, that an assignment be written to allow entry of the identifying number after the execution of the assignment. An example of acceptable wording is:

“I hereby authorize and request my attorney, (Insert name), of (Insert address), to insert here in parentheses (Application number , filed ) the filing date and application number of said application when known.”

302.04 Foreign Assignee May Designate Domestic Representative [R-10.2019]

35 u.s.c. 293   nonresident patentee; service and notice..

Every patentee not residing in the United States may file in the Patent and Trademark Office a written designation stating the name and address of a person residing within the United States on whom may be served process or notice of proceedings affecting the patent or rights thereunder. If the person designated cannot be found at the address given in the last designation, or if no person has been designated, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia shall have jurisdiction and summons shall be served by publication or otherwise as the court directs. The court shall have the same jurisdiction to take any action respecting the patent or rights thereunder that it would have if the patentee were personally within the jurisdiction of the court.

37 CFR 3.61  Domestic representative.

If the assignee of a patent, patent application, trademark application or trademark registration is not domiciled in the United States, the assignee may designate a domestic representative in a document filed in the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The designation should state the name and address of a person residing within the United States on whom may be served process or notice of proceedings affecting the application, patent or registration or rights thereunder.

An assignee of a patent or patent application who is not domiciled in the United States may, by written document signed by such assignee, designate a domestic representative. The designation of domestic representative should always be submitted to the Office as a paper separate from any assignment document. The designation of a domestic representative should be clearly labeled “Designation of Domestic Representative” and it will be entered into the record of the appropriate application or patent file. The designation must be signed in accordance with 37 CFR 1.33(b) .

302.05 Address of Assignee [R-08.2012]

The address of the assignee may be recited in the assignment document and must be given in the required cover sheet. See MPEP § 302.07 .

302.06 Fee for Recording [R-10.2019]

37 cfr 3.41  recording fees..

  • (a) All requests to record documents must be accompanied by the appropriate fee. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a fee is required for each application, patent and registration against which the document is recorded as identified in the cover sheet. The recording fee is set in § 1.21(h) of this chapter for patents and in § 2.6(b)(6) of this chapter for trademarks.
  • (1) The document does not affect title and is so identified in the cover sheet (see § 3.31(c)(2)); and
  • (2) The document and cover sheet are either: Faxed or electronically submitted as prescribed by the Director, or mailed to the Office in compliance with § 3.27 .

The recording fee set in 37 CFR 1.21(h) is charged for each patent application and patent identified in the required cover sheet except as provided in 37 CFR 3.41(b) . If the request to record a document is submitted electronically, the fee is set forth in 37 CFR 1.21(h)(1) , currently at $0. If the request to record a document is not submitted electronically (i.e., is submitted on paper or via facsimile), the applicable fee is set forth in 37 CFR 1.21(h)(2) . Customers should check the current fee schedule on the Office website before submitting documents for recordation. See MPEP §§ 302.08 - 302.10 for additional information regarding the acceptable ways to submit documents for recordation.

302.07 Assignment Document Must Be Accompanied by a Cover Sheet  [R-10.2019]

37 cfr 3.28  requests for recording..

Each document submitted to the Office for recording must include a single cover sheet (as specified in § 3.31 ) referring either to those patent applications and patents, or to those trademark applications and registrations, against which the document is to be recorded. If a document to be recorded includes interests in, or transactions involving, both patents and trademarks, then separate patent and trademark cover sheets, each accompanied by a copy of the document to be recorded, must be submitted. If a document to be recorded is not accompanied by a completed cover sheet, the document and the incomplete cover sheet will be returned pursuant to § 3.51 for proper completion, in which case the document and a completed cover sheet should be resubmitted.

37 CFR 3.31  Cover sheet content.

  • (1) The name of the party conveying the interest;
  • (2) The name and address of the party receiving the interest;
  • (3) A description of the interest conveyed or transaction to be recorded;
  • (i) For trademark assignments and trademark name changes: Each trademark registration number and each trademark application number, if known, against which the Office is to record the document. If the trademark application number is not known, a copy of the application or a reproduction of the trademark must be submitted, along with an estimate of the date that the Office received the application; or
  • (ii) For any other document affecting title to a trademark or patent application, registration or patent: Each trademark or patent application number or each trademark registration number or patent against which the document is to be recorded, or an indication that the document is filed together with a patent application;
  • (5) The name and address of the party to whom correspondence concerning the request to record the document should be mailed;
  • (6) The date the document was executed;
  • (i) Place a symbol comprised of letters, numbers, and/or punctuation marks between forward slash marks ( e.g. /Thomas O’Malley III/) in the signature block on the electronic submission; or
  • (ii) Sign the cover sheet using some other form of electronic signature specified by the Director.
  • (8) For trademark assignments, the entity and citizenship of the party receiving the interest. In addition, if the party receiving the interest is a domestic partnership or domestic joint venture, the cover sheet must set forth the names, legal entities, and national citizenship (or the state or country of organization) of all general partners or active members that compose the partnership or joint venture.
  • (b) A cover sheet should not refer to both patents and trademarks, since any information, including information about pending patent applications, submitted with a request for recordation of a document against a trademark application or trademark registration will become public record upon recordation.
  • (1) Indicate that the document relates to a Government interest; and
  • (2) Indicate, if applicable, that the document to be recorded is not a document affecting title (see §  3.41(b) ).
  • (d) Each trademark cover sheet required by § 3.28 seeking to record a document against a trademark application or registration should include, in addition to the serial number or registration number of the trademark, identification of the trademark or a description of the trademark, against which the Office is to record the document.
  • (e) Each patent or trademark cover sheet required by § 3.28 should contain the number of applications, patents or registrations identified in the cover sheet and the total fee.
  • (f) Each trademark cover sheet should include the citizenship of the party conveying the interest.
  • (1) Identify the document as a “joint research agreement” (in the space provided for the description of the interest conveyed or transaction to be recorded if using an Office-provided form);
  • (2) Indicate the name of the owner of the application or patent (in the space provided for the name and address of the party receiving the interest if using an Office-provided form);
  • (3) Indicate the name of each other party to the joint research agreement party (in the space provided for the name of the party conveying the interest if using an Office-provided form); and
  • (4) Indicate the date the joint research agreement was executed.
  • (h) The assignment cover sheet required by § 3.28 for a patent application or patent will be satisfied by the Patent Law Treaty Model International Request for Recordation of Change in Applicant or Owner Form, Patent Law Treaty Model International Request for Recordation of a License/ Cancellation of the Recordation of a License Form, Patent Law Treaty Model Certificate of Transfer Form or Patent Law Treaty Model International Request for Recordation of a Security Interest/ Cancellation of the Recordation of a Security Interest Form, as applicable, except where the assignment is also an oath or declaration under § 1.63 of this chapter. An assignment cover sheet required by § 3.28 must contain a conspicuous indication of an intent to utilize the assignment as an oath or declaration under § 1.63 of this chapter.

Each assignment document submitted to the Office for recording must be accompanied by a cover sheet as required by 37 CFR 3.28 . The cover sheet for patents or patent applications must contain:

  • (A) The name of the party conveying the interest;
  • (B) The name and address of the party receiving the interest;
  • (C) A description of the interest conveyed or transaction to be recorded;
  • (D) Each patent application number or patent number against which the document is to be recorded, or an indication that the document is filed together with a patent application;
  • (E) The name and address of the party to whom correspondence concerning the request to record the document should be mailed;
  • (F) The date the document was executed; and
  • (G) The signature of the party submitting the document.

For applications filed on or after September 16, 2012, if the assignment document is also intended to serve as the required oath or declaration, the cover sheet must also contain a conspicuous indication of an intent to utilize the assignment as the required oath or declaration under 37 CFR 1.63 . See 37 CFR 3.31(h) .

If the document submitted for recordation is a joint research agreement or an excerpt of a joint research agreement, the cover sheet must clearly identify the document as a "joint research agreement" (in the space provided for the description of the interest conveyed if using Form PTO-1595). The date the joint research agreement was executed must also be identified. The cover sheet must also identify the name(s) of the owner(s) of the application or patent (in the space provided for the name and address of the party receiving the interest if using Form PTO-1595). The name(s) of every other party(ies) to the joint research agreement must also be identified (in the space provided for the name of the party conveying the interest if using Form PTO-1595).

Each patent cover sheet should contain the number of patent applications or patents identified in the cover sheet and the total fee.

Examples of the type of descriptions of the interest conveyed or transaction to be recorded that can be identified are:

  • (A) assignment;
  • (B) security agreement;
  • (C) merger;
  • (D) change of name;
  • (E) license;
  • (F) foreclosure;
  • (H) contract; and
  • (I) joint research agreement.

Cover sheets required by 37 CFR 3.28 seeking to record a governmental interest must also (1) indicate that the document relates to a governmental interest and (2) indicate, if applicable, that the document to be recorded is not a document affecting title.

A patent cover sheet may not refer to trademark applications or registrations.

Form PTO-1595, Recordation Form Cover Sheet, may be used as the cover sheet for recording documents relating to patent(s) and/or patent application(s) in the Office.

Form PTO-1595. Recordation Form Cover Sheet for Patents

302.08 Mailing Address for Submitting Assignment Documents [R-08.2012]

37 cfr 3.27  mailing address for submitting documents to be recorded..

Documents and cover sheets submitted by mail for recordation should be addressed to Mail Stop Assignment Recordation Services, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, Virginia 22313-1450, unless they are filed together with new applications.

37 CFR 3.27 sets out how documents submitted for recording should be addressed to the Office. In order to ensure prompt and proper processing, documents and their cover sheets should be addressed to the Mail Stop Assignment Recordation Services, Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA 22313-1450, unless they are filed together with new applications. Requests for recording documents which accompany new applications should be addressed to the Commissioner for Patents, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA 22313-1450.

302.09 Facsimile Submission of Assignment Documents [R-11.2013]

Assignments and other documents affecting title may be submitted to the Office via facsimile (fax). See the USPTO website or MPEP § 1730 for the facsimile number. This process allows customers to submit their documents directly into the automated Patent and Trademark Assignment System and receive the resulting recordation notice at their fax machine. The customer’s fax machine should be connected to a dedicated line because recordation notices will be returned automatically to the sending fax number through the Patent and Trademark Assignment System. If the Office system is unable to complete transmission of the recordation notice, the notice will be printed and mailed to the sender by U.S. Postal Service first class mail. Recorded documents will not be returned with the “Notice of Recordation.”

Any assignment-related document for patent matters submitted by facsimile must include:

  • (A) an identified application or patent number;
  • (B) one cover sheet to record a single transaction; and
  • (C) payment of the recordation fee by a credit card (use of the Credit Card form, PTO-2038 (see MPEP § 509 ), is required for the credit card information to be kept separate from the assignment records) or a USPTO Deposit Account.

The following documents cannot be submitted via facsimile:

  • (A) Assignments submitted concurrently with newly filed patent applications;
  • (B) Documents with two or more cover sheets (e.g., a single document with one cover sheet to record an assignment, and a separate cover sheet to record separately a license relating to the same property); and
  • (C) Requests for “at cost” recordation services.

The date of receipt accorded to an assignment document sent to the Office by facsimile transmission is the date the complete transmission is received in the Office. See MPEP § 502.01 . The benefits of a certificate of transmission under 37 CFR 1.8 are available.

If a document submitted by fax is determined not to be recordable, the entire document, with its associated cover sheet, and the Office “Notice of Non-Recordation” will be transmitted via fax back to the sender. Once corrections are made, the initial submission, amended, may then be resubmitted by mailing the corrected submission to the address set forth in 37 CFR 3.27 . Timely resubmission will provide the sender with the benefit of the initial receipt date as the recordation date in accordance with 37 CFR 3.51 .

The Patent and Trademark Assignment System assigns reel and frame numbers and superimposes recordation stampings on the processed and stored electronic images. Accordingly, copies of all recorded documents will have the reel and frame numbers and recordation stampings.

302.10 Electronic Submission of Assignment Documents [R-10.2019]

  • (i) Place a symbol comprised of letters, numbers, and/or punctuation marks between forward slash marks ( e.g. /Thomas O’ Malley III/) in the signature block on the electronic submission; or

37 CFR 1.4  Nature of correspondence and signature requirements.

  • (i) The S-signature must consist only of letters, or Arabic numerals, or both, with appropriate spaces and commas, periods, apostrophes, or hyphens for punctuation, and the person signing the correspondence must insert his or her own S-signature with a first single forward slash mark before, and a second single forward slash mark after, the S-signature ( e.g., /Dr. James T. Jones, Jr./); and
  • (ii) A patent practitioner (§ 1.32(a)(1) ), signing pursuant to §§ 1.33(b)(1) or 1.33(b)(2) , must supply his/her registration number either as part of the S-signature, or immediately below or adjacent to the S-signature. The number (#) character may be used only as part of the S-signature when appearing before a practitioner’s registration number; otherwise the number character may not be used in an S-signature.
  • (A) Presented in printed or typed form preferably immediately below or adjacent the S-signature, and
  • (B) Reasonably specific enough so that the identity of the signer can be readily recognized.
  • (3) Electronically submitted correspondence . Correspondence permitted via the Office electronic filing system may be signed by a graphic representation of a handwritten signature as provided for in paragraph (d)(1) of this section or a graphic representation of an S-signature as provided for in paragraph (d)(2) of this section when it is submitted via the Office electronic filing system.
  • (i) Certification as to the paper presented. The presentation to the Office (whether by signing, filing, submitting, or later advocating) of any paper by a party, whether a practitioner or non-practitioner, constitutes a certification under § 11.18(b) of this subchapter. Violations of § 11.18(b)(2) of this subchapter by a party, whether a practitioner or non-practitioner, may result in the imposition of sanctions under § 11.18(c) of this subchapter. Any practitioner violating § 11.18(b) of this subchapter may also be subject to disciplinary action. See § 11.18(d) of this subchapter.
  • (ii) Certification as to the signature. The person inserting a signature under paragraph (d)(2) or (d)(3) of this section in a document submitted to the Office certifies that the inserted signature appearing in the document is his or her own signature. A person submitting a document signed by another under paragraph (d)(2) or (d)(3) of this section is obligated to have a reasonable basis to believe that the person whose signature is present on the document was actually inserted by that person, and should retain evidence of authenticity of the signature. Violations of the certification as to the signature of another or a person’s own signature as set forth in this paragraph may result in the imposition of sanctions under § 11.18(c) and (d) of this chapter.
  • (5) Forms. The Office provides forms for the public to use in certain situations to assist in the filing of correspondence for a certain purpose and to meet certain requirements for patent applications and proceedings. Use of the forms for purposes for which they were not designed is prohibited. No changes to certification statements on the Office forms ( e.g., oath or declaration forms, terminal disclaimer forms, petition forms, and nonpublication request forms) may be made. The existing text of a form, other than a certification statement, may be modified, deleted, or added to, if all text identifying the form as an Office form is removed. The presentation to the Office (whether by signing, filing, submitting, or later advocating) of any Office form with text identifying the form as an Office form by a party, whether a practitioner or non-practitioner, constitutes a certification under § 11.18(b) of this chapter that the existing text and any certification statements on the form have not been altered other than permitted by EFS-Web customization.

Assignments and other documents affecting title may be submitted to the Office via the Office’s Electronic Patent Assignment System (EPAS). See the USPTO website at http://epas.uspto.gov for additional information regarding EPAS.

Any assignment related document submitted by EPAS must include:

  • (A) an identified application or patent number; and
  • (B) one cover sheet to record a single transaction which cover sheet is to be completed on-line.

The fee set in 37 CFR 1.21(h)(1) for recording an electronically submitted document is currently $0. Customers should check the current fee schedule on the Office website before submitting documents for recordation. If a recordation fee is required, see MPEP § 509 for detailed information pertaining to the payment of fees.

For an assignment document filed electronically, the signature of the person who signs the cover sheet must comply with 37 CFR 3.31(a)(7) or 37 CFR 1.4(d)(2) .

The date of receipt accorded to an assignment document sent to the Office by EPAS is the date the complete transmission is received in the Office.

If a document submitted by EPAS is determined not to be recordable, the entire document, with its associated cover sheet, and the Office "Notice of Non-Recordation" will be transmitted via fax back to the sender if possible. Once corrections are made, the initial submission, as amended, may then be resubmitted by mailing the corrected submission to the address set forth in 37 CFR 3.27 . Timely submission will provide the sender with the benefit of the initial receipt date as the recordation date in accordance with 37 CFR 3.51 .

  • 301.01-Accessibility of Assignment Records
  • 302.01-Assignment Document Must Be Copy for Recording
  • 302.02-Translation of Assignment Document
  • 302.03-Identifying Patent or Application
  • 302.04-Foreign Assignee May Designate Domestic Representative
  • 302.05-Address of Assignee
  • 302.06-Fee for Recording
  • 302.07-Assignment Document Must Be Accompanied by a Cover Sheet 
  • 302.08-Mailing Address for Submitting Assignment Documents
  • 302.09-Facsimile Submission of Assignment Documents
  • 302.10-Electronic Submission of Assignment Documents
  • 303-Assignment Documents Not Endorsed on Pending Applications
  • 304‑305-[Reserved]
  • 306.01-Assignment of an Application Claiming the Benefits of a Provisional Application
  • 307-Issue to Non-Applicant Assignee
  • 308-Issue to Applicant
  • 309-Restrictions Upon Employees of U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
  • 310-Government License Rights to Contractor-Owned Inventions Made Under Federally Sponsored Research and Development
  • 311-Filing of Notice of Arbitration Awards
  • 312-[Reserved]
  • 313-Recording of Licenses, Security Interests, and Documents Other Than Assignments
  • 314-Certificates of Change of Name or of Merger
  • 315-Indexing Against a Recorded Certificate
  • 316-[Reserved]
  • 317.01-Recording Date
  • 317.02-Correction of Unrecorded Returned Documents and Cover Sheets
  • 317.03-Effect of Recording
  • 318-Documents Not to be Placed in Files
  • 319-[Reserved]
  • 320-Title Reports
  • 321‑322-[Reserved]
  • 323.01(a)-Typographical Errors in Cover Sheet
  • 323.01(b)-Typographical Errors in Recorded Assignment Document
  • 323.01(c)-Assignment or Change of Name Improperly Filed and Recorded by Another Person Against Owner’s Application or Patent
  • 323.01(d)-Expungement of Assignment Records
  • 324-Establishing Right of Assignee To Take Action in Application Filed Before September 16, 2012
  • 325-Establishing Right of Assignee To Take Action in Application Filed On or After September 16, 2012

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4 tips to help you complete online assignments on time.

4 Tips To Help You Complete Online Assignments On Time

How To Complete Online Assignments On Time

Most of the people who study online have other demanding commitments. As a result, online assignments can pile up and become overwhelming. At the last minute you may find yourself scrambling to get your assignment submitted before the clock strikes 12 midnight. Or, a worse scenario might be that you miss the deadline completely, thinking that you had more time. In order to avoid these mishaps and ensure you complete your online assignments on time, you should organize around your hectic schedule. The following strategies are what I used to ensure that all of my assignments were submitted on time.

1. Create A Time Table

At least a week before the official commencement of class, a course outline is usually posted in the course area. This course outline gives the assignments for each week. Get a head start by reviewing the eLearning course outline, a day or two prior, instead of waiting until class begins. Then create a time table; this way you already have a feel of what is expected of you for the entire course.

Pay specific attention to those assignments that are not a part of the discussion assignments. Usually, the weekly discussions are easier to complete than the written assignments. Use a calendar and mark the dates for the assignments for the course, depending on the length of the course. My courses at Walden University were 8 weeks long, which made it was easy for me to write down the courses on a ruled paper and stick it on my working desk where it was always visible.

The goal of writing down the assignments is to have a mental knowledge about how you will be able to fit in with your work schedule. For me working out how I will do my assignments was a little less challenging because we were given a monthly duty-sheet, at work, the majority of the times.

2. Gather Information For Your Online Assignments Beforehand

Usually, the assignments are interrelated to the classroom discussions; this makes it easier to source the information. Take time to read some of the recommended chapters and make sure to use the assignment questions and criteria for grading as a guide.

As you go along sourcing information, you may want to bookmark the pages you read, if it is a printed copy. If it is a digital book, you can print the relevant pages (if you have a preference for reading on paper than on a computer) and highlight the parts of the passage which you think answers the questions. Be sure to bookmark URLs to library articles you want to use for referencing, according to school’s reference guidelines. Also, remember to keep all printed material in a labeled folder so you can easily find when you are ready to construct your assignment.

3. Make Notes As You Read The Course Materials

If you have a brilliant idea while reading write it down and make sure your writing is legible. Sometimes we tell ourselves we will remember; however, if we fail to write, it is likely we will forget what these ideas were when it is time to do the assignment. If you are one who does not mind getting your book dirty you can make notes in the books as you go along.

For me, I enjoyed writing ideas alongside the text when it triggered an idea, but I used pencil which can be easily erased if I decide to sell my used books. When I wrote down my ideas, it was easier for me when it was time to do the first draft of my online assignment. Furthermore, if you fail to start your assignment early, the notes will provide a foundation on which to build your points, quickly.

4. Start Doing Your Online Assignment In Advance

Sometimes, you might have written assignments due weekly or bi-weekly; make sure that you recheck the date for submission. Review your reading material and use the notes and highlighted text as a guide to formatting your question.

When writing the draft for your online assignment, use the criteria and make sure that you answer the questions. Use appropriate headings and sub-headings to make your assignment look professional.

When writing the draft, you may find you may write more than the stipulated pages, but do not worry. The best way to make a brilliant online assignment is to write the thoughts as they flow then taking the time to arrange your content appropriately under the headings.

After you have done brainstorming and free-writing, look back at what you wrote and rearrange the content accordingly. A well written online assignment should be reader friendly. Avoid long sentences where necessary and use appropriate scenarios or examples to make your point to the instructor. Write as concisely as possible and ensure that you do not go above the page stipulations. If you did not write the introduction earlier on, now is the time to do so. Review guidelines for writing an introduction. Lastly, make sure to add a conclusion and references for your assignment (Check guidelines for referencing format), then proof read. (You can also use tools such as Grammarly for grammar check and Turnitin to help with avoiding plagiarism, if available in your classroom resources).

The tips above are flexible. Feel free to add your individuality or preferences and make the tips more relevant to your circumstances. These strategies worked for me and from my recollection I only submitted a late assignment once in my almost 3.8 years of online studying. Some instructors deduct marks for late submission of assignments so please strive to be early when submitting your online assignments. All the best in your online learning experience.

For further insight into how you can succeed in online learning, read the article Five-step Strategy for Student Success with Online Learning .

  • Getting The Most Out Of Your eLearning Course: 10 Study Tips For Online Learners
  • 5 Tips For Online Student Time Management
  • Why Do Students Seek Online Help to Complete Their Homework?
  • 5 Time Management Tips For Managing An Online Classroom
  • Factors To Consider When Hiring An Online Tutor For Homework Help

Enago Academy

Manuscript Status: Things You Need to Know After Submission

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Your manuscript has been accepted, so what happens next? Generally, this is a three-step process: manuscript submission , peer review, and post-acceptance preparation. After a manuscript is submitted to a target journal, it undergoes peer review. However, several steps occur that often only the corresponding author is aware of. Once submitted to a journal, the manuscript travels around quite a bit and the manuscript status is followed using the manuscript number. The manuscript is either accepted or rejected . Following peer review, if a manuscript is accepted, it then undergoes proof development and a review process prior to publication. This process is often tedious as it requires careful review of the publication-ready version of your manuscript. If you miss anything here, it may be difficult to correct!

Post-Submission

Once the manuscript has been received by the journal, it is assigned a manuscript number. The staff at the journal will check for compliance with formatting and style requirements. Meanwhile, a managing editor in the appropriate subject area performs an initial screening to decide if it is worth sending the manuscript for peer-review . During this “triage” stage, the editor may issue what is sometimes called a “desk rejection.” In brief, these rejections are due to the manuscript either being insufficiently novel, containing obvious problems with methodology or simply being off-topic for the journal.

Any required additional missing information will be solicited from the corresponding author prior to peer review. Anyone involved in peer reviewer must first accept the invitation to review your manuscript. Then, once all reviewers are in place, the manuscript is peer reviewed, which results in peer review reports that are returned to the editorial office for consideration by the Editor-in-Chief. In the end, the manuscript is accepted, rejected, or indicated to require revisions for the second round of peer-review.

Post-Acceptance

After the manuscript has been accepted, several logistical steps are taken to prepare it for publication. First, in some instances, the English language in the manuscript must be improved. This may be performed using an editing service . Whether this step is completed before or after acceptance is at the discretion of reviewers and editors. Indeed, some journals will accept the manuscript and perform subsequent editing or instead require the author to complete the editing process . Then, an invoice for the publishing fees is submitted to the corresponding author, which is subsequently paid prior to journal formatting. Once paid, the journal performs typesetting and manuscript proof development, which are approved by the editorial staff and proof management staff prior to being returned to the authors for review.

Finally, the proofs are reviewed by the authors involved in the study. Any requested corrections are returned to the journal until proof approval is granted. At this stage, the manuscript will often be published online in advance and, in some cases, in print. Weeks or months later, the manuscript information is transferred to PubMed or other central repositories for indexing.

Common Concerns and Questions

This general timeline varies by journal, the length of the peer review process, and uniqueness of each manuscript. Furthermore, various journals often have status descriptions that indicate the step that the manuscript is at during the review and publication process. Once your manuscript is submitted to a journal, it is important to keep the manuscript number handy! It will be used to track your manuscript through the peer review process and provide any other updates regarding your manuscript status.

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Answer to Question #108206 in English for Keolebogile

The last stage submission of an assignment is proofreading the content.

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Viewing Submissions

Ready to check in and see how your students did? Let's do it. Revision Assistant allows you to see all the steps your students took while writing to the prompt. When you're looking at your students' submissions, remember that features like feedback and scores are only available on certain assignments, so don't be alarmed if you don't see that information for every assignment. Regardless of the assignment type though, each submission can be viewed by first navigating to the Assignment Overview Page. Keep reading to learn more.

Spot Check assignments are often used as timed assessments, so they have a 'collect' feature that stops the assignment and auto-turns in students work. To view Spot Check submissions, first press the Collect Spot Check button on the Assignment Overview page.

  • From the Assignment Overview page, you can access student essays by clicking Student Progress or Student Work in the sidebar. Here's what you can do on each page:

last stage before submission of an assignment

Viewing the Student Progress Page

  • Click  Student Progress  in the sidebar. This will take you to the Student Progress page for the assignment.

The progress overview table will look different depending on which assignment type you're reviewing. See Interpreting the Student Progress Page to help you understand what you're seeing.

  • To see a student's turned in work or latest draft, just click the student's name.
  • To download their current draft, click the check box next to their name and select the Download Current Draft button. You will still be able to see a student's latest draft even if they haven't turned it in yet.
  • Also on the Student Progress page are the Class Report and Assignment Report buttons. Use these buttons to export reports on how your class is doing on one assignment or in an entire rubric category!

Viewing Student Work Page

  • Click Student Work in the sidebar. This will bring you to the Student Work page.
  • To see students' work, click the arrows to the left and right of each student's name at the top right of the page.
  • Each student's most recent draft (even if it's a Proofread draft) will be expanded at the top of the page. All previous essay drafts and Proofread drafts a student wrote will be collapsed beneath the recent draft.

To only see a specific type of previous draft (i.e. only Proofread drafts or only Turned In drafts), click the Show [Draft Type] dropdown next to the student's name at the top right of the page.

last stage before submission of an assignment

  • When you scroll down to the previous drafts, click the arrows next to each essay or Proofread draft time stamp to expand the draft.

Click the Signal Check icons above each draft to see the overarching feedback the student received.

  • Click the Signal Check icons along the side of each draft to see the specific feedback the student received.

Remember, Expansion Pack assignments give students holistic feedback, but they do not give sentence-level feedback like Signal Check assignments do, so you will not see icons along the sides of Expansion Pack essay drafts.

  • Click each underlined word or phrase to see the reason it was flagged as a grammar or spelling error.
  • Click Show Example to see the full explanation your student received for how to correct each error.

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EssayCorp

7 Credits to be Considered Before Submitting The Assignment

7 Points to be View Before Submit The Assignment

  • Emily Scott

Learning is considered the most significant duty for students in building a personality. They go thanks the vast majority of their days getting done with academic ventures and assignments. Welcome there, In regards to your points, 1 & 5 - I agree, I raised this issue in this blog post: https://Blueracket.com/t5/Assignment-Enhancements-Users/Position-of-attached-files-on-assignment-enhancements-submission/td-p/539738 We have not anyway released this gadget, but its interesting to discern th...

Studies trend to assume essential jobs in your evaluation, whether toward colleges, college, or school. College students middle on embellishment his life toward the path to receive anywhere benefits . Assignments are crucial as they maintain a essential posting or a portion away ampere student's yearly grade.

When him study in school alternatively college, are are plenty of assignments students must deal with. They be exceed expectations in classes, among start, plus in other extra-curricular exercises.

The simple explanation for the motivation hinter assignments lives to improve the studying skills of college both school students. In suchlike a case that the scholars think carefully, thereto is more possibilities they can find unfashionable additional.

Academic assignments improve students' innovativeness as they go significantly more familiar with them when they practice or read something alone. So the essential explanations about donating submission homework is to provide a training presentation furthermore information upgrade on a subject.

Wealth must agree that assignments play the most critical function in shaping a student's yearly performance.

What goes wrong with assignment submission?

As we all know, assignments are vital academicals tasks for adenine student. No one wants to spare a loose end toward it. A student tends to put all the effort into their assignment writing and still needs for yield top grades.

What could be which reason? Have you even thought about that reasons behind such ampere scenario? If you not, we will permit you knowing.

Assignment writing can an enormous project which capacity extend beyond goal writing only. It also has many elements is need up be taken worry of. Most our make several mistakes the must to pay more attention to her before the final submission.

You read that right; students must consider many substantial points before submitting their academic assignments. This blog desire inform you nearly important issues you should consider before submitting.

Points to consider before making the final submission

The students must appropriately evaluate numerous features and essential points before knocking that submit button. Here are take discussed such significant issues to consider. Need a look.

English both recording formation – The most important stuff to watch out to before submitting the assignment remains toward check the grammar. Grammatical errors can ruin your assignment quality at once, and you will score go grades. If of international filing date remains prior to Sep 16, 2012 and that basic national pay has has paid plus the copy of the foreign application (if ...

Thus to retrieve good grades, always spare quality time to rectify above-mentioned grammar mistakes. Never lost any spelling or sentence structure errors at your assignment. And Writing Usage

Never use slang – Ensure you haven't used any informally writing style before submitting your academic project. Jargon and slang are known to be routine pieces of writings. Using such parts can degrade your work.

Always try to use the formal and academic style of report till score better classification on the assignments. However, most students prance this step and jumps at direct submission, which expense their latter.

Keep a check on word count – Always remember that all the universities and colleges have a particular phrase reckon for every academic assignment. It relies upon its topic or conception.

It has been observed that many students never bother to check their phrase count in jobs. It tends on impact the quality of their working, plus they need better grades. Universities measure the assignment performance of ampere student in this standard as well. This course guide shows you how till submit one PDF, ampere series of images, code batch, and bubble sheets, and how to work on Online Assignments with and not the LockDown Browser exam security measures enabled.

So itp is advisable immersive into keep an eyeball open for the length. Real the total word count of your appointment before submission. However, students sack apply online equipment to check who total number of words written at themselves in their work. There are many tools open online available this.

Images – Many scholars and students enter the your in an Google Gallery seek bar. They hit enter and paste the image into their document. In no case, there is something that it don't verify for – the copyright. The last stage submission from an assignment is ... 1.drawing skyward a work plot 2.profreading the content 3.adding the list of references 4.compiling the table of contents

At any point you open the picture, present remains constantly a denial compiled underneath that says an image might be copyrighted. Subsequently, you shouldn consistently ensure so the photo you are utilizing shall don secured by autorenrecht.

One ought take earlier consent from the proprietor before using the painting. Movies ability also be plagiarized, which is unacceptable in many universities real colleges. Written are a process that can be divided into three stages: Pre-writing, drafting and the final editing stage any includes editing and proofreading. In the first stage thou research your topics and make preparatory labor before i enter the drafting level. After you have written your text it is important that you take time to revise and true items before submitted the final result.

In your task, verification whenever you have utilized any copyrighted photo. On the off chance that you have, take the consents of of initial creator and give the credits. Try not to distribute the picture in your project to avoid copyright violence. Late work. Later the due date has passed real you open an submission, you're alerted that your subscribe will be marked late. You can view the alert in the ...

Constantly check the referencing select – All universities prescribe their particular referencing type, which the college should follow. Referencing holds a crucial place for it came to academic assignment writing. Re: Student Confusion turn Assignment Submission Page

Graduate were advised at check your references style before making the final submission of the appointment. Examine when yours reference or referencing style is according toward the rules. Check theirs and guarantee your insight on is referencing style is cutting-edge.

Check the markings criteria – See which rules and guidelines recurring and ensure that checking zonal are accurately saved up. Journal position, the technique utilizes, tables arranged, and accordingly on are portions of stamping realms.

Follow the rules right now. Never miss the point. If you still necessity to include something, you must change the mission. To supposed all shall considered if you want to score decent ranks in an academic assignment. The last stage back send for an assignment

Postscript – I can't clarify various stuff in the appropriate retort document, yet you be educate the reader about one value. Likewise, you can't now and after incorporate each progression of the calculations your performed, making and reader wonder.

Some annexes want to making the most of one word for such cases. Employing this, you can give the moment data to the eventual reader. It have clean everything you couldn't in principle arrangement unpaid to the word check.

Continuously observe that the task doesn't have any missing dates. Are you are skirt an few level, ensure it is clarified in an index toward finishing this duty. A additionally leave fulfill your tutors.

To sum up, those points helps a student in writing a ideal duty. Check these vital points and elements before submitting your assignment. It will get you extemporize your work and gain negative results.

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last stage before submission of an assignment

IMAGES

  1. Assignment submission tips for a higher grade

    last stage before submission of an assignment

  2. Assignment Submission Instructions

    last stage before submission of an assignment

  3. 4 Benefits of Submitting Your Assignments in PDF Format

    last stage before submission of an assignment

  4. How to Write an Introduction for an Assignment

    last stage before submission of an assignment

  5. Submitting Assignments

    last stage before submission of an assignment

  6. Assignment Submission

    last stage before submission of an assignment

COMMENTS

  1. Assignment Finishing Touches

    You should have aimed to have finished the writing stage of your work at least a couple of days before the deadline. That way, when you re-read it, the topics are still fairly fresh in your mind but you will see what you have written with fresh eyes, making it easier to spot mistakes. Re-read your work slowly.

  2. The Writing Process

    Table of contents. Step 1: Prewriting. Step 2: Planning and outlining. Step 3: Writing a first draft. Step 4: Redrafting and revising. Step 5: Editing and proofreading. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about the writing process.

  3. Understanding Assignments

    What this handout is about. The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one. This handout will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms ...

  4. The Writing Process: 6 Steps Every Writer Should Know

    The last stage of the writing process is proofreading your final draft. At this stage, you're finished writing, but you're not quite ready to hand in your assignment. Proofreading is one last lookover to catch any spelling mistakes, grammar errors, typos, formatting errors, or incorrect structure or syntax. Unless something is egregiously ...

  5. 7 Points to be Considered Before Submitting The Assignment

    Have a look. Grammar and sentence formation - The most important thing to watch out for before submitting the assignment is to check the grammar. Grammatical errors can ruin your assignment quality at once, and you will score lower grades. So to get good grades, always spare quality time to rectify these grammar mistakes.

  6. Academic Writing Skills Guide: Planning Your Assignments

    This template is designed to assist you with the collection and organisation of information into your notes and to plan the structure of your work before you start writing your first draft. The Assignment Planning - Guidelines has four stages: Stage #1 - Collecting Information. Use the collecting information sheets to insert paraphrases from ...

  7. Planning Your Assignment Timeline

    After you have gained an understanding of your assignment by analysing the information given to you, it is advised that you create an assignment timeline. Creating an assignment timeline can help increase your certainty and clarity over what you need to do and when. Use the tabs to learn more about how you can plan your assignment timeline.

  8. How quickly should an assignment be returned to students?

    Homework should be returned within a few weeks. But again, I am only proposing this as a guideline. I realize that waiting to grade assignments does give the professor a chance to show mercy to students who sometimes turn in their assignments late. It may make sense for the professor's grading timetable to be intertwined with the late policy.

  9. How strict should you be? A guide to assignment due dates.

    Here are three solid approaches to deadline flexibility for low-stakes assessments: 1. Not flexible: Late work is never accepted. If a student misses a deadline, they receive zero points on that assignment. This approach works best in courses that have many low-stakes assignments, such as reading quizzes on every textbook chapter, where missing ...

  10. Preparing the Final Draft

    Preparing the Final Draft. You may be able to move directly from your revised first draft to a final draft, but careful writers often prepare several drafts before they are satisfied with a piece. As you rewrite, you may continue to discover wordy constructions, poor connections, awkward sentences, and other issues. Writing and editing a draft.

  11. teaching

    Submission time may or may not have anything to do with when a student STARTS the assignment, so even the students turning it in at the last minute may not be under pressure. As long as you give reasonable deadlines and clearly post them to avoid "gotcha" situations, any deadline you give is certainly fair.

  12. 302-Recording of Assignment Documents

    Chapter 0300. Section 302. (a) Assignments of applications, patents, and registrations, and other documents relating to interests in patent applications and patents, accompanied by completed cover sheets as specified in § 3.28 and § 3.31 , will be recorded in the Office. Other documents, accompanied by completed cover sheets as specified in ...

  13. PDF Academic assignment presentation and submission

    Electronic submission of assignments ..... 8 Electronic submission of assignments via TurnitinTM ... Before submission Firstly, check that you have addressed the assignment topic or question. Check the length of your assignment. It should be within 10% of the specified

  14. 4 Tips To Help You Complete Online Assignments On Time

    1. Create A Time Table. At least a week before the official commencement of class, a course outline is usually posted in the course area. This course outline gives the assignments for each week. Get a head start by reviewing the eLearning course outline, a day or two prior, instead of waiting until class begins.

  15. Manuscript Status: Things You Need to Know After Submission

    After a manuscript is submitted to a target journal, it undergoes peer review. However, several steps occur that often only the corresponding author is aware of. Once submitted to a journal, the manuscript travels around quite a bit and the manuscript status is followed using the manuscript number. The manuscript is either accepted or rejected.

  16. Answer in English for Keolebogile #108206

    Answers >. English >. Other. Question #108206. The last stage submission of an assignment is ... 1.drawing up a work plan. 2.profreading the content. 3.adding the list of references. 4.compiling the table of contents.

  17. PDF Procrastination and Delayed Assignment Submissions: Student and Faculty

    Ages ranged from 25 to 64 years of age with a majority of faculty participants, 45.3% between the ages of 35 to 44. Furthermore, 9.4% were 25 to 34 years of age, 26.4% were between 45 to 54 years of age, and 18.9% were between. 55 to 64 years of age. Of the 53 faculty participants, 62.7% were female and 37.7% were male.

  18. Q: How to understand the status descriptions for my submission?

    Initially, once your paper was submitted, the status showed "Admin not assigned." Then it was assigned to an Editorial Assistant (EA) for admin check. This is when the status changed to "EA: [name]." Once the EA started checking the manuscript, the status changed to "Awaiting ED Assignment." At this stage, the EA goes through the paper and ...

  19. Work Assignments During the Interview Process: What To ...

    First, consider what type of project they are asking you to complete. Work assignments should give you a chance to show your abilities, but they should not be too intensive. The employer should be respectful of your time. Many people who are interviewing for jobs have a current job or have other responsibilities in their lives.

  20. Viewing Submissions

    Spot Check assignments are often used as timed assessments, so they have a 'collect' feature that stops the assignment and auto-turns in students work. To view Spot Check submissions, first press the Collect Spot Check button on the Assignment Overview page. From the Assignment Overview page, you can access student essays by clicking Student ...

  21. What does it mean if my manuscript is in the Editor Assigned status for

    The Editor Assigned status typically means that your manuscript has cleared the initial check (for basic aspects such as adherence to the journal's guidelines and a scope match) and has now been assigned to an Associate Editor (AE). The AE will now check your manuscript for aspects such as the novelty of the research and the quality of the paper and decide whether or not it should go for ...

  22. The Writing Process

    Writing your a process that pot be divided into three stages: Pre-writing, article and the final revising tier which includes cutting and proofreading. In the start platform you research my themes plus construct preparatory work before you enter the drafting stage. After you need written own text it is important that you take time to refine and correct it before submitting the final result.

  23. How to handle students who try to negotiate away penalties for late

    If you are penalized for submitting late you can recover these points with an extra assignment at the end of the course. You'll need to mark an extra assignment, but most students will suddenly be fine with accepting the penalty anyway. ... with the last successful submission before the deadline counting for the grade. This is the way most MOOC ...