Cyber Bullying Essay for Students and Children

500+ words essay on cyber bullying.

Cyber Bullying Essay: In today’s world which has been made smaller by technology, new age problems have been born. No doubt technology has a lot of benefits; however, it also comes with a negative side. It has given birth to cyberbullying. To put it simply, cyberbullying refers to the misuse of information technology with the intention to harass others.

cyber bullying essay

Subsequently, cyberbullying comes in various forms. It doesn’t necessarily mean hacking someone’s profiles or posing to be someone else. It also includes posting negative comments about somebody or spreading rumors to defame someone. As everyone is caught up on the social network, it makes it very easy for anyone to misuse this access.

In other words, cyberbullying has become very common nowadays. It includes actions to manipulate, harass and defame any person. These hostile actions are seriously damaging and can affect anyone easily and gravely. They take place on social media, public forums, and other online information websites. A cyberbully is not necessarily a stranger; it may also be someone you know.

Cyber Bullying is Dangerous

Cyberbullying is a multi-faced issue. However, the intention of this activity is one and the same. To hurt people and bring them harm. Cyberbullying is not a light matter. It needs to be taken seriously as it does have a lot of dangerous effects on the victim.

Moreover, it disturbs the peace of mind of a person. Many people are known to experience depression after they are cyberbullied. In addition, they indulge in self-harm. All the derogatory comments made about them makes them feel inferior.

It also results in a lot of insecurities and complexes. The victim which suffers cyberbullying in the form of harassing starts having self-doubt. When someone points at your insecurities, they only tend to enhance. Similarly, the victims worry and lose their inner peace.

Other than that, cyberbullying also tarnishes the image of a person. It hampers their reputation with the false rumors spread about them. Everything on social media spreads like wildfire. Moreover, people often question the credibility. Thus,  one false rumor destroys people’s lives.

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How to Prevent Cyber Bullying?

Cyberbullying prevention is the need of the hour. It needs to be monitored and put an end to. There are various ways to tackle cyberbullying. We can implement them at individual levels as well as authoritative levels.

Firstly, always teach your children to never share personal information online. For instance, if you list your home address or phone number there, it will make you a potential target of cyberbullying easily.

cyber bullying essay introduction

Secondly, avoid posting explicit photos of yourself online. Also, never discuss personal matters on social media. In other words, keep the information limited within your group of friends and family. Most importantly, never ever share your internet password and account details with anyone. Keep all this information to yourself alone. Be alert and do not click on mysterious links, they may be scams. In addition, teach your kids about cyberbullying and make them aware of what’s wrong and right.

In conclusion, awareness is the key to prevent online harassment. We should make the children aware from an early age so they are always cautious. Moreover, parents must monitor their children’s online activities and limit their usage. Most importantly, cyberbullying must be reported instantly without delay. This can prevent further incidents from taking place.

FAQs on Cyber Bullying

Q.1 Why is Cyberbullying dangerous?

A.1 Cyberbullying affects the mental peace of a person. It takes a toll on their mental health. Moreover, it tarnishes the reputation of an individual.

Q.2 How to prevent cyberbullying?

A.2 We may prevent cyberbullying by limiting the information we share online. In addition, we must make children aware of the forms of cyberbullying and its consequences.

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Cyberbullying: what is it and how to stop it, what teens want to know about cyberbullying..

Cyberbullying: What is it and how to stop it

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We brought together UNICEF specialists, international cyberbullying and child protection experts, and teamed up with Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok and X to answer some of the most common questions about online bullying and give advice on ways to deal with it. 

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is bullying with the use of digital technologies. It can take place on social media, messaging platforms, gaming platforms and mobile phones. It is repeated behaviour, aimed at scaring, angering or shaming those who are targeted. Examples include:

  • spreading lies about or posting embarrassing photos or videos of someone on social media
  • sending hurtful, abusive or threatening messages, images or videos via messaging platforms
  • impersonating someone and sending mean messages to others on their behalf or through fake accounts.

Face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying can often happen alongside each other. But cyberbullying leaves a digital footprint – a record that can prove useful and provide evidence to help stop the abuse.

If you are worried about your safety or something that has happened to you online, you can seek help by calling your national helpline . If your country does not have a helpline, please urgently speak to an adult you trust or seek professional support from trained and experienced carers.

The top questions on cyberbullying

  • Am I being bullied online? How do you tell the difference between a joke and bullying?
  • What are the effects of cyberbullying?
  • How can cyberbullying affect my mental health?
  • Who should I talk to if someone is bullying me online? Why is reporting important?
  • I’m experiencing cyberbullying, but I’m afraid to talk to my parents about it. How can I approach them?
  • How can I help my friends report a case of cyberbullying especially if they don’t want to do it?
  • How do we stop cyberbullying without giving up access to the internet?
  • How do I prevent my personal information from being used to manipulate or humiliate me on social media?
  • Is there a punishment for cyberbullying?
  • Technology companies don’t seem to care about online bullying and harassment. Are they being held responsible?
  • Are there any online anti-bullying tools for children or young people?

Am I being bullied online? How do you tell the difference between a joke and bullying?

1. Am I being bullied online? How do you tell the difference between a joke and bullying?

All friends joke around with each other, but sometimes it’s hard to tell if someone is just having fun or trying to hurt you, especially online. Sometimes they’ll laugh it off with a “just kidding,” or “don’t take it so seriously.” 

But if you feel hurt or think others are laughing at you instead of with you, then the joke has gone too far. If it continues even after you’ve asked the person to stop and you are still feeling upset about it, then this could be bullying.

And when the bullying takes place online, it can result in unwanted attention from a wide range of people including strangers. Wherever it may happen, if you are not happy about it, you should not have to stand for it.

Call it what you will – if you feel bad and it doesn’t stop, then it’s worth getting help. Stopping cyberbullying is not just about calling out bullies, it’s also about recognizing that everyone deserves respect – online and in real life.

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What are the effects of cyberbullying?

2. What are the effects of cyberbullying?

When bullying happens online it can feel as if you’re being attacked everywhere, even inside your own home. It can seem like there’s no escape. The effects can last a long time and affect a person in many ways:

  • Mentally – feeling upset, embarrassed, stupid, even afraid or angry 
  • Emotionally – feeling ashamed or losing interest in the things you love
  • Physically – tired (loss of sleep), or experiencing symptoms like stomach aches and headaches 

The feeling of being laughed at or harassed by others, can prevent people from speaking up or trying to deal with the problem. In extreme cases, cyberbullying can even lead to people taking their own lives. 

Cyberbullying can affect us in many ways. But these can be overcome and people can regain their confidence and health.

Illustration - boy with face buried in hands

3. How can cyberbullying affect my mental health?

When you experience cyberbullying you might start to feel ashamed, nervous, anxious and insecure about what people say or think about you. This can lead to withdrawing from friends and family, negative thoughts and self-talk, feeling guilty about things you did or did not do, or feeling that you are being judged negatively. Feeling lonely, overwhelmed, frequent headaches, nausea or stomachaches are also common.

You can lose your motivation to do the things that you usually enjoy doing and feel isolated from the people you love and trust. This can perpetuate negative feelings and thoughts which can adversely affect your mental health and well-being.

Skipping school is another common effect of cyberbullying and can affect the mental health of young people who turn to substances like alcohol and drugs or violent behaviour to deal with their psychological and physical pain. Talking to a friend, family member or school counsellor you trust can be a first step to getting help.

The effects of cyberbullying on mental health can vary depending on the medium through which it happens. For example, bullying via text messaging or through pictures or videos on social media platforms has proven to be very harmful for adolescents.   

Cyberbullying opens the door to 24-hour harassment and can be very damaging. That’s why we offer in-app mental health and well-being support through our feature “ Here For You .” This Snapchat portal provides resources on mental health, grief, bullying, harassment, anxiety, eating disorders, depression, stress, and suicidal thoughts. It was developed in partnership with leading international advocacy and mental health organizations to help Snapchatters contend with some very real issues. Still, our foundational piece of guidance for any well-being issue is to talk to someone: a friend, parent, caregiver, trusted adult – anyone whom you trust to listen.

At Snap, nothing is more important than the safety and well-being of our community.  Reach out and tell us how we might be able to help.    

Cyberbullying has the potential of having a negative impact on people's mental health. It's why it's so important that you reach out to someone you trust – whether it's a parent, teacher, friend or caregiver – and let them know what you're going through so that they can help you.

The well-being of our community matters hugely to us, and we recognise that cyberbullying can have an adverse impact on people's mental health. As well as taking strong action against content or behaviour that seeks to shame, bully or harass members of our community, we have partnered with experts to develop our well-being guide to help people learn more about improving their well-being, and keep TikTok a safe and inclusive home for our community.

Who should I talk to if someone is bullying me online? Why is reporting important?

4. Who should I talk to if someone is bullying me online? Why is reporting important?

If you think you’re being bullied, the first step is to seek help from someone you trust such as your parents, a close family member or another trusted adult.

In your school you can reach out to a counsellor, the sports coach or your favourite teacher – either online or in person.

And if you are not comfortable talking to someone you know, search for a helpline in your country to talk to a professional counsellor.

If the bullying is happening on a social platform, consider blocking the bully and formally reporting their behaviour on the platform itself. Social media companies are obligated to keep their users safe.

For bullying to stop, it needs to be identified and reporting it is key.

It can be helpful to collect evidence – text messages and screen shots of social media posts – to show what’s been going on.

For bullying to stop, it needs to be identified and reporting it is key. It can also help to show the bully that their behaviour is unacceptable.

If you are in immediate danger, then you should contact the police or emergency services in your country.

Facebook/Instagram

At Meta, we take bullying and harassment situations seriously. Bullying and harassment is a unique challenge and one of the most complex issues to address because context is critical. We work hard to enforce against this content while also equipping our community with tools to protect themselves in ways that work best for them.

If you're experiencing bullying online, we encourage you to talk to a parent, teacher or someone else you can trust – you have a right to be safe and supported.

We also make it easy to report bullying directly within Facebook or Instagram. You can send our team a report from a post, comment, story or direct message (DM). Your report is anonymous; the account you reported won’t see who reported them. We have a team who reviews these reports 24/7 around the world in 70+ languages and we will remove anything that violates our policies.

Meta’s Family Center offers resources, insights and expert guidance to help parents, guardians and trusted adults support their teen’s online experiences across our technologies. Additionally, the Meta Safety Center provides bullying prevention resources that can help teens seeking support for issues related to bullying like what to do if you or a friend is being bullied or if you've been called a bully. For educators , we have expert-backed tips on how to proactively handle and work to implement bullying prevention strategies

Bullying is something no one should have to experience, either in person or online. 

Snapchat’s Community Guidelines clearly and explicitly prohibit bullying, intimidation, and harassment of any kind. We don’t want it on the platform; it’s not in keeping with why Snapchat was created and designed. Learn more here .

Letting us know when you experience or witness someone breaking our rules allows us to take action, which helps to protect you and other members of our community. In addition to reporting violating content or behaviour to Snapchat, speak with a friend, parent, caregiver, or other trusted adult. Our goal is for everyone to stay safe and have fun!

Everyone has the right to feel safe and to be treated with respect and dignity. Bullying and harassment are incompatible with the inclusive environment we aim to foster on TikTok. 

If you ever feel someone is bullying you or otherwise being inappropriate, reach out to someone you trust - for example, a parent, a teacher or a caregiver – who can provide support.

We deploy both technology and thousands of safety professionals to help keep bullying off TikTok. We also encourage our community members to make use of the easy in-app reporting tools to alert us if they or someone they know has experienced bullying. You can report videos, comments, accounts and direct messages so that we can take appropriate action and help keep you safe. Reports are always confidential. 

You can find out more in our Bullying Prevention guide for teens, caregivers, and educators on how to identify and prevent bullying, and provide support.

Being the target of bullying online is not easy to deal with. If you are being cyberbullied, the most important thing to do is to ensure you are safe. It’s essential to have someone to talk to about what you are going through. This may be a teacher, another trusted adult, or a parent. Talk to your parents and friends about what to do if you or a friend are being cyberbullied.

We encourage people to report accounts to us that may break our  rules . You can do this on our  Help Center  or through the in-Tweet reporting mechanism by clicking on the “Report a Tweet” option.

Last updated: January 2022.

I’m experiencing cyberbullying, but I’m afraid to talk to my parents about it. How can I approach them?

5. I’m experiencing cyberbullying, but I’m afraid to talk to my parents about it. How can I approach them?

If you are experiencing cyberbullying, speaking to a trusted adult – someone you feel safe talking to – is one of the most important first steps you can take.

Talking to parents isn’t easy for everyone. But there are things you can do to help the conversation. Choose a time to talk when you know you have their full attention. Explain how serious the problem is for you. Remember, they might not be as familiar with technology as you are, so you might need to help them to understand what’s happening.

They might not have instant answers for you, but they are likely to want to help and together you can find a solution. Two heads are always better than one! If you are still unsure about what to do, consider reaching out to other trusted people . There are often more people who care about you and are willing to help than you might think!

How can I help my friends report a case of cyberbullying especially if they don’t want to do it?

6. How can I help my friends report a case of cyberbullying especially if they don’t want to do it?

Anyone can become a victim of cyberbullying. If you see this happening to someone you know, try to offer support.

It is important to listen to your friend. Why don’t they want to report being cyberbullied? How are they feeling? Let them know that they don’t have to formally report anything, but it’s crucial to talk to someone who might be able to help.

Anyone can become a victim of cyberbullying.

Remember, your friend may be feeling fragile. Be kind to them. Help them think through what they might say and to whom. Offer to go with them if they decide to report. Most importantly, remind them that you’re there for them and you want to help.

If your friend still does not want to report the incident, then support them in finding a trusted adult who can help them deal with the situation. Remember that in certain situations the consequences of cyberbullying can be life threatening.

Doing nothing can leave the person feeling that everyone is against them or that nobody cares. Your words can make a difference.

We know that it can be hard to report bullying, but everyone deserves to feel safe online. If your friend is experiencing cyberbullying, encourage them to talk to a parent, a teacher or an adult they trust.

Reporting content or accounts to Facebook or Instagram is anonymous and can help us better keep our platforms safe. Bullying and harassment are highly personal by nature, so in many instances, we need a person to report this behaviour to us before we can identify or remove it. You can report something you experience yourself, but it’s also just as easy to submit a report for one of your friends. You can find more information on how to report something on our How to Report Bullying section  at the Meta Safety Center.

You and your friends may be reluctant to report to a technology platform for any number of reasons, but it’s important to know that reporting on Snapchat is confidential and easy. And remember: You can report Snaps (photos and videos), Chats (messages) and accounts – about your own experiences or on behalf of someone else. 

In the more public places of Snapchat, like Stories and Spotlight, simply press and hold on the piece of content and a card with “Report Tile” (as one option) will appear in red. Click that link and our reporting menu will appear. Bullying and harassment are among the first categories in the reporting list. Just follow the prompts and provide as much information as you can about the incident. We appreciate you doing your part to help us protect the Snapchat community!  

If you believe another member of the TikTok community is being bullied or harassed, there are ways you can provide support. For example, you can make a confidential report on TikTok so that we take appropriate action and help keep your friend safe. 

If you know the person, consider checking in with them and encourage them to read our Bullying Prevention guide so they can find out more information about how to identify bullying behaviour and take action.

If your friends are experiencing cyberbullying, encourage them to talk to a parent, a teacher or an adult they trust.

If a friend of yours does not want to report their experience, you can submit a bystander report  on their behalf. This can include reports of private information , non -consensual nudity  or impersonation.

Being online gives me access to lots of information, but it also means I am open to abuse. How do we stop cyberbullying without giving up access to the Internet?

7. How do we stop cyberbullying without giving up access to the Internet?

Being online has so many benefits. However, like many things in life, it comes with risks that you need to protect against.

If you experience cyberbullying, you may want to delete certain apps or stay offline for a while to give yourself time to recover. But getting off the Internet is not a long-term solution. You did nothing wrong, so why should you be disadvantaged? It may even send the bullies the wrong signal — encouraging their unacceptable behaviour. 

We need to be thoughtful about what we share or say that may hurt others.

We all want cyberbullying to stop, which is one of the reasons reporting cyberbullying is so important. But creating the Internet we want goes beyond calling out bullying. We need to be thoughtful about what we share or say that may hurt others. We need to be kind to one another online and in real life. It's up to all of us!

We’re continuously developing new technologies  to encourage positive interactions and take action on harmful content, and launching new tools to help people have more control over their experience. Here are some tools you can use:

  • Comment warnings: When someone writes a caption or a comment that our AI detects as potentially offensive or intended to harass, we will show them an alert that asks them to pause and reflect on whether they would like to edit their language before it’s posted.
  • Comment and message controls: Comments with common offensive words, phrases or emojis, and abusive messages or messages from strangers can be automatically hidden or filtered out with the ‘ Hidden words ’ setting, which is defaulted on for all people. If you want an even more personalized experience, you can create a custom list of emojis, words or phrases you don’t want to see, and comments containing these terms won’t appear under your posts and messages will be sent to a filtered inbox. All Instagram accounts have the option to switch off DMs from people they don’t follow. Messenger also gives you the option to ignore a conversation and automatically move it out of your inbox, without having to block the sender.
  • Block and Mute: You can always  block  or  mute  an account that is bullying you, and that account will not be notified. When you block someone on Instagram, you’ll also have the option to block other accounts they may have or create, making it more difficult for them to interact with you.
  • Restrict: With ‘Restrict,’ you can protect your account from unwanted interactions in a quieter, or more subtle way. Once Restrict is enabled, comments on your posts from a person you have restricted will only be visible to that person. You can choose to view the comment by tapping “See Comment”; approve the comment so everyone can see it; delete it; or ignore it. You won’t receive any notifications for comments from a restricted account.
  • Limits:  You can automatically hide comments and DM requests from people who don’t follow you, or who only recently followed you. If you’re going through an influx of unwanted comments or messages — or think you may be about to — you can turn on Limits and avoid it.

Our priority is to foster a welcoming and safe environment where people feel free to express themselves authentically. Our Community Guidelines make clear that we do not tolerate members of our community being shamed, bullied or harassed. 

We use a combination of technology and moderation teams to help us identify and remove abusive content or behaviour from our platform. 

We also provide our community with an extensive range of tools to help them better control their experience – whether it's control over exactly who can view and interact with your content or filtering tools to help you stay in control of comments. You can find out about them on our Safety Centre . 

Since hundreds of millions of people share ideas on X every day, it’s no surprise that we don’t all agree with each other all the time. That’s one of the benefits of a public conversation in that we can all learn from respectful disagreements and discussions.

But sometimes, after you’ve listened to someone for a while, you may not want to hear them anymore. Their right to express themselves doesn’t mean you’re required to listen. If you see or receive a reply you don’t like, unfollow  and end any communication with that account. If the behaviour continues, it is recommended that you block the account . If you continue receiving unwanted, targeted and continuous replies on X, consider reporting the behaviour to X here .

We are also working proactively to protect people using our service through a combination of human review and technology. Learn more about how to feel safer on X here .

How do I prevent my personal information from being used to manipulate or humiliate me on social media?

8. How do I prevent my personal information from being used to manipulate or humiliate me on social media?

Think twice before posting or sharing anything on digital platforms – it may be online forever and could be used to harm you later. Don’t give out personal details such as your address, telephone number or the name of your school.

Learn about the privacy settings of your favourite social media apps. Here are some actions you can take on many of them: 

  • You can decide who can see your profile, send you direct messages or comment on your posts by adjusting your account privacy settings. 
  • You can report hurtful comments, messages, photos and videos and request they be removed.
  • Besides ‘unfriending’, you can completely block people to stop them from seeing your profile or contacting you.
  • You can also choose to have comments by certain people to appear only to them without completely blocking them.
  • You can delete posts on your profile or hide them from specific people. 

On most of your favourite social media, people aren't notified when you block, restrict or report them.

Is there a punishment for cyberbullying?

9. Is there a punishment for cyberbullying?

Most schools take bullying seriously and will take action against it. If you are being cyberbullied by other students, report it to your school.

People who are victims of any form of violence, including bullying and cyberbullying, have a right to justice and to have the offender held accountable.

Laws against bullying, particularly on cyberbullying, are relatively new and still do not exist everywhere. This is why many countries rely on other relevant laws, such as ones against harassment, to punish cyberbullies.

In countries that have specific laws on cyberbullying, online behaviour that deliberately causes serious emotional distress is seen as criminal activity. In some of these countries, victims of cyberbullying can seek protection, prohibit communication from a specified person and restrict the use of electronic devices used by that person for cyberbullying, temporarily or permanently.

However, it is important to remember that punishment is not always the most effective way to change the behaviour of bullies. Sometimes, focusing on repairing the harm and mending the relationship can be better.

On Facebook, we have a set of  Community Standards , and on Instagram, we have  Community Guidelines . We take action when we are aware of content that violates these policies, like in the case of bullying or harassment, and we are constantly improving our detection tools so we can find this content faster.

Bullying and harassment can happen in many places and come in many different forms from making threats and releasing personally identifiable information to sending threatening messages and making unwanted malicious contact. We do not tolerate this kind of behavior because it prevents people from feeling safe and respected on our apps.

Making sure people don’t see hateful or harassing content in direct messages can be challenging, given they’re private conversations, but we are taking steps to take tougher action when we become aware of people breaking our rules. If someone continues to send violating messages, we will disable their account. We’ll also disable new accounts created to get around our messaging restrictions and will continue to disable accounts we find that are created purely to send harmful messages.

On Snapchat, reports of cyberbullying are reviewed by Snap’s dedicated Trust & Safety teams, which operate around the clock and around the globe. Individuals found to be involved in cyberbullying may be given a warning, their accounts might be suspended or their accounts could be shut down completely. 

We recommend leaving any group chat where bullying or any unwelcome behaviour is taking place and please report the behaviour and/or the account to us.  

Our Community Guidelines define a set of norms and common code of conduct for TikTok and they provide guidance on what is and is not allowed to make a welcoming space for everyone. We make it clear that we do not tolerate members of our community being shamed, bullied or harassed. We take action against any such content and accounts, including removal.

We strongly enforce our rules to ensure all people can participate in the public conversation freely and safely. These rules specifically cover a number of areas including topics such as:

  • Child sexual exploitation
  • Abuse/harassment
  • Hateful conduct
  • Suicide or self-harm
  • Sharing of sensitive media, including graphic violence and adult content

As part of these rules, we take a number of different enforcement actions when content is in violation. When we take enforcement actions, we may do so either on a specific piece of content (e.g., an individual Tweet or Direct Message) or on an account.

You can find more on our enforcement actions here .

Internet companies don’t seem to care about online bullying and harassment. Are they being held responsible?

10. Technology companies don’t seem to care about online bullying and harassment. Are they being held responsible?

Technology companies are increasingly paying attention to the issue of online bullying.

Many of them are introducing ways to address it and better protect their users with new tools, guidance and ways to report online abuse.

But it is true that more is needed. Many young people experience cyberbullying every day. Some face extreme forms of online abuse. Some have taken their own lives as a result.

Technology companies have a responsibility to protect their users especially children and young people.

It is up to all of us to hold them accountable when they’re not living up to these responsibilities.

Are there any online anti-bullying tools for children or young people?

11. Are there any online anti-bullying tools for children or young people?

Each social platform offers different tools (see available ones below) that allow you to restrict who can comment on or view your posts or who can connect automatically as a friend, and to report cases of bullying. Many of them involve simple steps to block, mute or report cyberbullying. We encourage you to explore them.

Social media companies also provide educational tools and guidance for children, parents and teachers to learn about risks and ways to stay safe online.

Also, the first line of defense against cyberbullying could be you. Think about where cyberbullying happens in your community and ways you can help – by raising your voice, calling out bullies, reaching out to trusted adults or by creating awareness of the issue. Even a simple act of kindness can go a long way.

The first line of defense against cyberbullying could be you.

If you are worried about your safety or something that has happened to you online, urgently speak to an adult you trust. Many countries have a special helpline you can call for free and talk to someone anonymously. Visit  United for Global Mental Health to find help in your country.

We have a number of anti-bullying tools across Facebook and Instagram:

  • You can block people, including any existing and new accounts they might create.
  • You can  mute  an account and that account will not be notified.
  • You can limit unwanted interactions for a period of time by automatically hiding comments and message requests from people who don’t follow you, or who only recently followed you.
  • You can use ‘ Restrict ’ to discreetly protect your account without that person being notified.
  • You can  moderate comments  on your own posts.
  • You can  modify your settings  so that only people you follow can send you a direct message.
  • We will notify someone when they’re about to post something that might cross the line, encouraging them to reconsider.
  • We automatically filter out comments and message requests that don’t go against our Community Guidelines but may be considered inappropriate or offensive. You can also create your own custom list of emojis, words or phrases that you don’t want to see.

For more tips and ideas, visit Instagram’s Safety page and Facebook’s Bullying Prevention Hub . We also offer resources, insights and expert guidance for parents and guardians on our Family Center .

We want teens and young adults to be aware of the blocking and removal functions on Snapchat. Clicking on the person’s avatar will bring up a three-dot menu in the upper right-hand corner. Opening that menu offers the option of “Manage Friendship,” which, in turn, offers the ability to Report, Block or Remove the person as a friend. Know that if you block someone, they will be told that their Snaps and Chats to you will be delivered once the relationship is restored.  

It’s also a good idea to check privacy settings to ensure they continue to be set to the default setting of “Friends Only.” This way, only people you’ve added as Friends can send you Snaps and Chats.  

We also recommend reviewing your Friends’ list from time to time to ensure it includes those people you still want to be friends with on Snapchat.  

Alongside the work that our safety teams do to help keep bullying and harassment off our platform, we provide an extensive range of tools to help you control your TikTok experience. You can find these in full on our Safety Centre . Here are a few highlights:

  • You can restrict who comments on your videos to no one, just friends or everyone (for those aged under 16, the everyone setting is not available)
  • You can filter all comments or those with specific keywords that you choose. By default, spam and offensive comments are hidden from users when we detect them.
  • You can delete or report multiple comments at once, and you can block accounts that post bullying or other negative comments in bulk too, up to 100 at a time.
  • A comment prompt asks people to reconsider posting a comment that may be inappropriate or unkind, reminding them of our Community Guidelines and allowing them to edit their comments before sharing.

We want everybody to be safe on X. We continue to launch and improve tools for people to feel safer, be in control and manage their digital footprint. Here are some safety tools anyone on X can use: 

  • Select who can reply to your Tweets  – either everyone, only people you follow or only people you mention
  • Mute – removing an account's Tweets from your timeline without unfollowing or blocking that account
  • Block – restricting specific accounts from contacting you, seeing your Tweets, and following you
  • Report – filing a report about abusive behaviour
  • Safety mode  – a feature that temporarily blocks accounts for using potentially harmful language or sending repetitive and uninvited replies or mentions.

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  • Cyberbullying

What Is Cyberbullying

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Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place over digital devices like cell phones, computers, and tablets. Cyberbullying can occur through SMS, Text, and apps, or online in social media, forums, or gaming where people can view, participate in, or share content. Cyberbullying includes sending, posting, or sharing negative, harmful, false, or mean content about someone else. It can include sharing personal or private information about someone else causing embarrassment or humiliation. Some cyberbullying crosses the line into unlawful or criminal behavior.

The most common places where cyberbullying occurs are:

  • Social Media, such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Tik Tok
  • Text messaging and messaging apps on mobile or tablet devices
  • Instant messaging, direct messaging, and online chatting over the internet
  • Online forums, chat rooms, and message boards, such as Reddit
  • Online gaming communities

Special Concerns

With the prevalence of social media and digital forums, comments, photos, posts, and content shared by individuals can often be viewed by strangers as well as acquaintances. The content an individual shares online – both their personal content as well as any negative, mean, or hurtful content – creates a kind of permanent public record of their views, activities, and behavior. This public record can be thought of as an online reputation, which may be accessible to schools, employers, colleges, clubs, and others who may be researching an individual now or in the future. Cyberbullying can harm the online reputations of everyone involved – not just the person being bullied, but those doing the bullying or participating in it. Cyberbullying has unique concerns in that it can be:

Persistent – Digital devices offer an ability to immediately and continuously communicate 24 hours a day, so it can be difficult for children experiencing cyberbullying to find relief.

Permanent – Most information communicated electronically is permanent and public, if not reported and removed. A negative online reputation, including for those who bully, can impact college admissions, employment, and other areas of life.

Hard to Notice – Because teachers and parents may not overhear or see cyberbullying taking place, it is harder to recognize.

Laws and Sanctions

All states have laws requiring schools to respond to bullying. As cyberbullying has become more prevalent with the use of technology, many states now include cyberbullying , or mention cyberbullying offenses, under these laws. Schools may take action either as required by law, or with local or school policies that allow them to discipline or take other action. Some states also have provisions to address bullying if it affects school performance. You can learn about the laws and policies in each state, including if they cover cyberbullying.

Frequency of Cyberbullying

There are two sources of federally collected data on youth bullying:

  • The 2019  School Crime Supplement  to the National Crime Victimization Survey (National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice) indicates that, nationwide, about 16 percent of students in grades 9–12 experienced cyberbullying.
  • The 2021 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) indicates that an estimated 15.9% of high school students were electronically bullied in the 12 months prior to the survey.

See also " Frequency of Bullying ."

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Cyberbullying: Everything You Need to Know

  • Cyberbullying
  • How to Respond

Cyberbullying is the act of intentionally and consistently mistreating or harassing someone through the use of electronic devices or other forms of electronic communication (like social media platforms).

Because cyberbullying mainly affects children and adolescents, many brush it off as a part of growing up. However, cyberbullying can have dire mental and emotional consequences if left unaddressed.

This article discusses cyberbullying, its adverse effects, and what can be done about it.

FangXiaNuo / Getty Images

Cyberbullying Statistics and State Laws

The rise of digital communication methods has paved the way for a new type of bullying to form, one that takes place outside of the schoolyard. Cyberbullying follows kids home, making it much more difficult to ignore or cope.

Statistics 

As many as 15% of young people between 12 and 18 have been cyberbullied at some point. However, over 25% of children between 13 and 15 were cyberbullied in one year alone.

About 6.2% of people admitted that they’ve engaged in cyberbullying at some point in the last year. The age at which a person is most likely to cyberbully one of their peers is 13.

Those subject to online bullying are twice as likely to self-harm or attempt suicide . The percentage is much higher in young people who identify as LGBTQ, at 56%.

Cyberbullying by Sex and Sexual Orientation

Cyberbullying statistics differ among various groups, including:

  • Girls and boys reported similar numbers when asked if they have been cyberbullied, at 23.7% and 21.9%, respectively.
  • LGBTQ adolescents report cyberbullying at higher rates, at 31.7%. Up to 56% of young people who identify as LGBTQ have experienced cyberbullying.
  • Transgender teens were the most likely to be cyberbullied, at a significantly high rate of 35.4%.

State Laws 

The laws surrounding cyberbullying vary from state to state. However, all 50 states have developed and implemented specific policies or laws to protect children from being cyberbullied in and out of the classroom.

The laws were put into place so that students who are being cyberbullied at school can have access to support systems, and those who are being cyberbullied at home have a way to report the incidents.

Legal policies or programs developed to help stop cyberbullying include:

  • Bullying prevention programs
  • Cyberbullying education courses for teachers
  • Procedures designed to investigate instances of cyberbullying
  • Support systems for children who have been subject to cyberbullying 

Are There Federal Laws Against Cyberbullying?

There are no federal laws or policies that protect people from cyberbullying. However, federal involvement may occur if the bullying overlaps with harassment. Federal law will get involved if the bullying concerns a person’s race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, disability, or religion.

Examples of Cyberbullying 

There are several types of bullying that can occur online, and they all look different.

Harassment can include comments, text messages, or threatening emails designed to make the cyberbullied person feel scared, embarrassed, or ashamed of themselves.

Other forms of harassment include:

  • Using group chats as a way to gang up on one person
  • Making derogatory comments about a person based on their race, gender, sexual orientation, economic status, or other characteristics
  • Posting mean or untrue things on social media sites, such as Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram, as a way to publicly hurt the person experiencing the cyberbullying  

Impersonation

A person may try to pretend to be the person they are cyberbullying to attempt to embarrass, shame, or hurt them publicly. Some examples of this include:

  • Hacking into someone’s online profile and changing any part of it, whether it be a photo or their "About Me" portion, to something that is either harmful or inappropriate
  • Catfishing, which is when a person creates a fake persona to trick someone into a relationship with them as a joke or for their own personal gain
  • Making a fake profile using the screen name of their target to post inappropriate or rude remarks on other people’s pages

Other Examples

Not all forms of cyberbullying are the same, and cyberbullies use other tactics to ensure that their target feels as bad as possible. Some tactics include:

  • Taking nude or otherwise degrading photos of a person without their consent
  • Sharing or posting nude pictures with a wide audience to embarrass the person they are cyberbullying
  • Sharing personal information about a person on a public website that could cause them to feel unsafe
  • Physically bullying someone in school and getting someone else to record it so that it can be watched and passed around later
  • Circulating rumors about a person

How to Know When a Joke Turns Into Cyberbullying

People may often try to downplay cyberbullying by saying it was just a joke. However, any incident that continues to make a person feel shame, hurt, or blatantly disrespected is not a joke and should be addressed. People who engage in cyberbullying tactics know that they’ve crossed these boundaries, from being playful to being harmful.

Effects and Consequences of Cyberbullying 

Research shows many negative effects of cyberbullying, some of which can lead to severe mental health issues. Cyberbullied people are twice as likely to experience suicidal thoughts, actions, or behaviors and engage in self-harm as those who are not.

Other negative health consequences of cyberbullying are:

  • Stomach pain and digestive issues
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Difficulties with academics
  • Violent behaviors
  • High levels of stress
  • Inability to feel safe
  • Feelings of loneliness and isolation
  • Feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness

If You’ve Been Cyberbullied 

Being on the receiving end of cyberbullying is hard to cope with. It can feel like you have nowhere to turn and no escape. However, some things can be done to help overcome cyberbullying experiences.

Advice for Preteens and Teenagers

The best thing you can do if you’re being cyberbullied is tell an adult you trust. It may be challenging to start the conversation because you may feel ashamed or embarrassed. However, if it is not addressed, it can get worse.

Other ways you can cope with cyberbullying include:

  • Walk away : Walking away online involves ignoring the bullies, stepping back from your computer or phone, and finding something you enjoy doing to distract yourself from the bullying.
  • Don’t retaliate : You may want to defend yourself at the time. But engaging with the bullies can make matters worse.
  • Keep evidence : Save all copies of the cyberbullying, whether it be posts, texts, or emails, and keep them if the bullying escalates and you need to report them.
  • Report : Social media sites take harassment seriously, and reporting them to site administrators may block the bully from using the site.
  • Block : You can block your bully from contacting you on social media platforms and through text messages.

In some cases, therapy may be a good option to help cope with the aftermath of cyberbullying.

Advice for Parents

As a parent, watching your child experience cyberbullying can be difficult. To help in the right ways, you can:

  • Offer support and comfort : Listening to your child explain what's happening can be helpful. If you've experienced bullying as a child, sharing that experience may provide some perspective on how it can be overcome and that the feelings don't last forever.
  • Make sure they know they are not at fault : Whatever the bully uses to target your child can make them feel like something is wrong with them. Offer praise to your child for speaking up and reassure them that it's not their fault.
  • Contact the school : Schools have policies to protect children from bullying, but to help, you have to inform school officials.
  • Keep records : Ask your child for all the records of the bullying and keep a copy for yourself. This evidence will be helpful to have if the bullying escalates and further action needs to be taken.
  • Try to get them help : In many cases, cyberbullying can lead to mental stress and sometimes mental health disorders. Getting your child a therapist gives them a safe place to work through their experience.

In the Workplace 

Although cyberbullying more often affects children and adolescents, it can also happen to adults in the workplace. If you are dealing with cyberbullying at your workplace, you can:

  • Let your bully know how what they said affected you and that you expect it to stop.
  • Keep copies of any harassment that goes on in the workplace.
  • Report your cyberbully to your human resources (HR) department.
  • Report your cyberbully to law enforcement if you are being threatened.
  • Close off all personal communication pathways with your cyberbully.
  • Maintain a professional attitude at work regardless of what is being said or done.
  • Seek out support through friends, family, or professional help.

Effective Action Against Cyberbullying

If cyberbullying continues, actions will have to be taken to get it to stop, such as:

  • Talking to a school official : Talking to someone at school may be difficult, but once you do, you may be grateful that you have some support. Schools have policies to address cyberbullying.
  • Confide in parents or trusted friends : Discuss your experience with your parents or others you trust. Having support on your side will make you feel less alone.
  • Report it on social media : Social media sites have strict rules on the types of interactions and content sharing allowed. Report your aggressor to the site to get them banned and eliminate their ability to contact you.
  • Block the bully : Phones, computers, and social media platforms contain options to block correspondence from others. Use these blocking tools to help free yourself from cyberbullying.

Help Is Available

If you or someone you know are having suicidal thoughts, dial  988  to contact the  988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline  and connect with a trained counselor. To find mental health resources in your area, contact the  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline  at  800-662-4357  for information.

Cyberbullying occurs over electronic communication methods like cell phones, computers, social media, and other online platforms. While anyone can be subject to cyberbullying, it is most likely to occur between the ages of 12 and 18.

Cyberbullying can be severe and lead to serious health issues, such as new or worsened mental health disorders, sleep issues, or thoughts of suicide or self-harm. There are laws to prevent cyberbullying, so it's essential to report it when it happens. Coping strategies include stepping away from electronics, blocking bullies, and getting.

Alhajji M, Bass S, Dai T. Cyberbullying, mental health, and violence in adolescents and associations with sex and race: data from the 2015 youth risk behavior survey . Glob Pediatr Health. 2019;6:2333794X19868887. doi:10.1177/2333794X19868887

Cyberbullying Research Center. Cyberbullying in 2021 by age, gender, sexual orientation, and race .

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: StopBullying.gov. Facts about bullying .

John A, Glendenning AC, Marchant A, et al. Self-harm, suicidal behaviours, and cyberbullying in children and young people: systematic review .  J Med Internet Res . 2018;20(4):e129. doi:10.2196/jmir.9044

Cyberbullying Research Center. Bullying, cyberbullying, and LGBTQ students .

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: StopBullying.gov. Laws, policies, and regulations .

Wolke D, Lee K, Guy A. Cyberbullying: a storm in a teacup? . Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017;26(8):899-908. doi:10.1007/s00787-017-0954-6

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: StopBullying.gov. Cyberbullying tactics .

Garett R, Lord LR, Young SD. Associations between social media and cyberbullying: a review of the literature . mHealth . 2016;2:46-46. doi:10.21037/mhealth.2016.12.01

Nemours Teens Health. Cyberbullying .

Nixon CL. Current perspectives: the impact of cyberbullying on adolescent health . Adolesc Health Med Ther. 2014;5:143-58. doi:10.2147/AHMT.S36456

Nemours Kids Health. Cyberbullying (for parents) .

By Angelica Bottaro Angelica Bottaro is a professional freelance writer with over 5 years of experience. She has been educated in both psychology and journalism, and her dual education has given her the research and writing skills needed to deliver sound and engaging content in the health space.

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Writing A Cyber Bullying Threats Essay Introduction

Table of Contents

Cyberbullying is a serious issue, not just for the victims but for society as a whole. Perpetrators use electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending intimidating or threatening messages to them. Cyberbullying essays discuss the effects of bullying on the victims and society at large.  Cyberbullying essay introduction  provides an overview of the topic and sets the tone for the rest of the essay,

Like other essays, the introduction of the cyberbullying essay puts the topic into perspective by presenting background information on cyberbullying. The introduction includes a hook that grabs the readers’ attention, background information that creates context, and a thesis statement that sets the central idea. 

What Is Cyberbullying Essay?

Cyberbullying is using electronic communication to attack, threaten, insult or intimate someone. With social networking platforms, cyberbullying has reached its peak. Perpetrators of cyberbullying remain anonymous and so go unpunished. 

Bullies use the internet (social networks, e-mail, instant messenger) and telephone to insult and threaten individuals, spread rumors and make false claims. Victims of cyberbullying experience social anxiety, loss of confidence and self-esteem, overall stress, and depression. 

Cyberbullying essays are common assignments in schools and colleges. They can be argumentative, informative, persuasive, or narrative. Cyberbullying essays may focus on discussing the issue, the effects on the victims and society, and possible solutions. The essay comprises three main parts: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. 

The introduction opens with a brief overview and background to the issue . It ends with the thesis statement, the essay’s central focus. The body of the paper elaborates on the main points of the piece. It describes cyberbullying, its adverse effects, and its effects on victims. The conclusion summarizes the key points discussed in the essay.

Best Cyberbullying Essay Topics

Sometimes your instructor may not give you a specific topic to write about. You’ll need to brainstorm and find a good topic in such cases. Here is the list of cyberbullying essay topics you might want to explore: 

  • Ethical case: Facebook gossips or cyberbullying?
  • Cyber Bullying as a Virtual Menace
  • Cyberbullying against teenagers more detrimental than face-to-face bullying?
  • Cyber Bullying Issue
  • Ethics in Technology: Cyber Crimes
  • Cyber Bullying and Its Forms
  • Discouraging and Eliminating Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying Reduction Program
  • Cyber Bullying and Positivist Theory of Crime 

Interesting Cyberbullying Topics

  • Cyberbullying Vs. Freedom Of Speech.
  • The Causes and Dangers of Cyberbullying.
  • Consequences of Cyberbullying in Schools.
  • The Effects Of Cyberbullying on the Mental Health of Youths.
  • Negative Effects of Technology on Social Skills: Lack of Awareness, Cyberbullying, Anxiety and Awkward Conversations.
  • Causes and Effects of Cyberbullying.
  • Cyberbullying Victimization on Children Addicted to the Internet.
  • Cyberbullying: Why Parents Need to Monitor Their Children’s Activity.
  • The Adverse Effects of Cyberbullying.
  • Cyberbullying, Unsecured Privacy Settings and Facebook Crime.
  • Cyberbullying: The Misuse of ICT
  • Why Should Cyberbullying Laws Be Enforced?
  • Cyberbullying, Its Impact, Forms and Relationship to Juvenile Delinquency.
  • How Cyberbullying Negatively Affects Lives.
  • The Effects of Cyberbullying on Substance Use and Mental Health.

Cyberbullying Essay Introduction

The introduction sets the tone for the whole essay. It’s an opportunity to grab the readers’ attention and compel them to read on . The introduction should include background information on the topic and the central focus of the essay.

The introduction should begin with a hook that attracts your audience and involves them in your work. Start with a bold statement, a shocking fact, an intriguing quote, or a thought-provoking question.

Give background on the cyberbullying essay topic. The information you provide should help the readers understand your argument and give them a reason to care.

Present Your Thesis. The thesis establishes the main point that you’ll discuss in the essay’s body. It is meant to be the reader’s key takeaway. Keep it clear and simple.

Cyberbullying Essay Introduction Examples

Bullying is traumatizing, and its effects are highly devastating. With technology improving, cyberbullying gets more and more common. Cyberbullying is hostile, with the intention of threatening, embarrassing, or harassing. This harassment is almost inescapable with all of the new technology in the world. Because cyberbullying has adverse effects, it’s become debated whether an individual’s online actions should be prosecuted. Cyberbullying has several destructive effects on the victim. Victims of cyberbullying often suffer from insecurity, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. Cyberbullies must be held accountable for their actions. 

………………………………….

With the many positive effects of technology come the negatives. A major con of technology is cyberbullying. The forms of cyberbullying are harassment, cyberstalking, defamation, insults, and threats. Cyberbullies cause emotional damage to those they victimize. Victims of cyberbullying turn out to become depressed, scared, and suicidal individuals. Cyberbullying is a serious issue that needs to be treated with a great deal of respect. We have to admit bullying can be a challenging subject to deal with. But, it is a reality that affects millions of people every day. 

person writing on brown wooden table near white ceramic mug

Final Words

Cyberbullying essay is a popular topic that discusses the issue, its effects, and possible solutions. These essays show that bullying is still prevalent in today’s society and needs to be stopped.

Cyberbullying essays can be narrative, argumentative, persuasive, or informative. Hook the reader with a short introductory paragraph to make them want more. Provide the background to spark their interest and the thesis to show why they should care enough to finish reading your essay.

Writing A Cyber Bullying Threats Essay Introduction

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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Cyber Bullying Essay Writing Guide — Means to Stop Cyberbullying

Did you know that one in three teenagers faces cyber threats on social networking sites? How about another interesting fact: many teens (more than 25%) have been bullied via their devices. Are these signs alarming? Should parents limit the children's access to mobile phones and computers or restrict their freedom for the sake of prevention from online attacks? Those are all great ideas for a cyber bullying essay. But what are the other features and requirements of this assignment? In our guide, we will go through the basics of a bullying essay and discuss different aspects of this matter. Also, you'll get some relevant tips that will be helpful if your homework is focused on cyberbullying issues.

If you cannot decide on the topic for your assignment or aren't confident about your writing skills — this article is for you.

What is a Cyberbullying Essay?

Without defining the purpose of an academic paper, it's hard to deal with it appropriately. An essay writing about cyberbullying aims to cover the issue of digital bullying by revealing different aspects of this subject and offering relevant examples. Here, you can define this phenomenon, express your attitude toward it, or propose effective solutions to prevent bullying in any manifestation. The main objective of your writing will always depend on the type of essay assigned:

  • Descriptive
  • Argumentative
  • Cause-effect
  • Compare-contrast

There is a whole range of factors that can influence your choice:

  • The aspect of cyber bullying you want to study.
  • A class for which you prepare an assignment.
  • The main statement you want to challenge or prove, etc.

In the next section, we'll try to help you with this decision.

Which Genre to Pick for a Writing on Cyberbullying?

The type of essay you pick greatly changes the strategy of your writing. If you select a definition one, you have to identify/explain the term using both official sources, dictionaries, and your best guesses. Don't forget to support your interpretations with real-life examples and personal experience if you have something to say.

  • In a descriptive paper, focus on the cyberbullying specifics or people who tend to become cyber bullies.
  • In a reflective paper, express your own attitude toward the issue or analyze the consequences of bullying you or your friend have faced.
  • In a narrative assignment, tell a story related to the problem. For example, you're an adult, and you want to save your child from the hooligan on the Internet.
  • In argumentative writing, you can state that colleges and universities should strengthen campus security and protect students' personal information better. Then, you'll need to prove your idea is valid.
  • If you work on the cause-and-effect cyber bullying essay paper, a good choice will be to focus on social media bullying and its influence on young people. So, hope you got the essence.

Also, to understand what to write about and how to meet the writing objectives, you may look for a sample essay on a topic similar to the one you picked. Or, if the cyberbullying is a too complicated subject matter for you, you can turn to our custom writing and editing services. If you need an expert to "do my homework for me," we will be glad to provide you with academic assistance anytime.

If you're going to write this essay yourself, the next aspect you have to consider is the structure.

Outline for a Cyberbullying Essay

The outline for your (for example) social media cyber bullying essay will be similar to the structure of any other writing assignment. You can either make it a 5-paragraph essay or add more sections depending on how many points you are going to discuss. For instance, a compare and contrast paper could be longer than a reflective assignment describing just one experience. Nevertheless, you cannot go wrong with a general essay outline:

  • Title page (if needed).
  • Introduction (hook sentence + topic presentation + thesis statement).
  • Body section(3 or more paragraphs).
  • Conclusion (paraphrased thesis + summary of the topic sentences + final statement).
  • References/Works Cited (depends on the chosen format: MLA citation, APA citation, etc.).

Let's look at each section in detail.

Introduction to a Cyberbullying Essay

In a cyber bullying essay introduction, the primary goal is to capture the reader's attention from the first line. Thus, we recommend starting with something interesting. One of these hooks related to the topic of cyberbullying should work:

  • Fact/Statistics
  • Rhetorical question

Once you're done with the hook, explain why the question you plan to discuss is relevant today. End with the powerful thesis statement like: " Taking into account more than 50% of adolescents never tell their parents about being attacked by a cyber bully, schools and colleges should hire qualified experts with whom students will be ready to share intimate details of such situations. "

Body Paragraphs of a Cyberbullying Essay

Start the first body paragraph using a transition word to show its connection with the introduction. Transitions words are "first of all," "to begin with," "thus," "unlike," "in contrast," etc. They all have different purposes, so make sure to choose the best one from the corresponding category (addition, opposition, etc.)

Each body paragraph should start with a topic sentence expressing the major idea of that particular section. Do not forget to add in-text citations and examples to make the reader understand the topic in-depth. Reference the sources correctly on the last page, in your bibliography.

To back your ideas with reliable facts, you have to conduct thoughtful research. Where to look for info that can come in handy? Look thought bullying articles on the Internet, use data from cyber bullying infographic and statistics — even a blog entry with its comment section can turn out to be useful.

The Conclusion to a Cyberbullying Essay

A cyberbullying essay conclusion should persuade the audience about the importance of the issues related to cyberbullying. Or, you have to make the readers think of this matter and its consequences. You may stress why specific preventive measures should be taken, or conclude that restricting access to mobile devices will not resolve the problem. It's up to you and your research results. In the last part of your writing, we recommend including a hook like a rhetorical question to leave a long-lasting impression and keep the reader interested in the topic raised.

10 Thrilling Cyberbullying Essay Topics

The professor may not specify what exactly you should cover in your essay about cyberbullying. That's why we have a list of the best ideas for you:

  • The ways mean messages can hurt.
  • Reasons to be involved in cyberbullying.
  • How a child can become a victim of cyberbullying.
  • How to protect yourself from online threats.
  • Preventive measures to avoid cyberbullying.
  • Differences and similarities between traditional bullying and cyberbullying.
  • A hidden name as a way to protect oneself from bullying on the Internet.
  • Sexting and its impact on the mind of an average high school student.
  • The role of cell phones in the problem of cyberbullying.
  • Consequences of cyberbullying and actions to be taken.

There is nothing much to say about a title that you should formulate. If you need one, it has to be a shortened version of the full topic. For instance, is the topic refers to stalling someone's account information to break into their personal life and sending harmful messages, you can make it shorter by narrowing down to "Reasons to Steal One's Account." Make sure your title is no longer than 60-70 characters long, especially when submitting a paper online.

If you struggle to write a good cyberbullying paper but have no ideas on how to hit a good grade, try using our online writing services. We can provide you with an academic assignment 24/7!

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Home — Essay Samples — Social Issues — Cyber Bullying

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Essays on Cyber Bullying

Cyberbullying essay topics and outline examples, essay title 1: unmasking the digital threat: understanding cyberbullying, its impact, and prevention strategies.

Thesis Statement: This essay delves into the world of cyberbullying, examining its forms, the profound emotional and psychological impact on victims, and proactive strategies to prevent and combat this digital menace.

  • Introduction
  • Defining Cyberbullying: Online Harassment, Trolling, and Social Media Abuse
  • Victims' Stories: The Emotional Toll of Cyberbullying
  • Cyberbullying vs. Traditional Bullying: Key Differences and Similarities
  • Online Platforms and Anonymity: Factors Facilitating Cyberbullying
  • Mental Health Consequences: Depression, Anxiety, and Suicidal Ideation
  • Prevention and Intervention: Educating Youth, Parental Guidance, and Legal Measures
  • Conclusion: Creating Safer Digital Spaces for All

Essay Title 2: The Role of Social Media in Cyberbullying: Exploring Platforms, Trends, and Countermeasures

Thesis Statement: This essay investigates the prominent role of social media in cyberbullying, analyzes emerging trends, and discusses countermeasures employed by platforms and users to mitigate online harassment.

  • Social Media and Cyberbullying: Platforms as Virtual Battlegrounds
  • Cyberbullying Trends: Online Shaming, Doxxing, and Revenge Porn
  • Platform Responsibility: Policies, Reporting Mechanisms, and Content Moderation
  • User Empowerment: Digital Literacy, Privacy Settings, and Reporting Abuse
  • Case Studies: High-Profile Cyberbullying Incidents and Their Impact
  • Psychological Insights: Understanding the Mindset of Cyberbullies
  • Conclusion: Navigating the Intersection of Social Media and Cyberbullying

Essay Title 3: Beyond the Screen: The Real-World Consequences of Cyberbullying and Advocating for Change

Thesis Statement: This essay sheds light on the real-world consequences of cyberbullying, including legal ramifications, societal attitudes, and the importance of advocacy in raising awareness and driving change.

  • Legal Implications: Laws and Consequences for Cyberbullies
  • Societal Attitudes: Victim Blaming, Empathy, and the Role of Media
  • Advocacy and Support: Organizations and Movements Combatting Cyberbullying
  • Personal Stories: Survivors and Activists Leading the Fight
  • Educational Initiatives: Schools, Communities, and Digital Citizenship
  • Building Empathy: Fostering Online Communities of Kindness and Respect
  • Conclusion: A Call to Action - Eradicating Cyberbullying in the Digital Age

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Cyberbullying refers to the harmful and intentional use of digital technologies, such as social media platforms, online forums, or messaging apps, to harass, intimidate, or humiliate individuals. It involves the repeated and deliberate targeting of someone through electronic means, resulting in emotional, psychological, or even physical distress.

Cyberbullying remains a pressing issue in the United States today, affecting individuals of all ages and backgrounds. With the widespread use of technology and social media platforms, instances of cyberbullying have increased, leaving a significant impact on the well-being of those involved. In the US, cyberbullying can take various forms, including sending hurtful messages, spreading rumors, sharing embarrassing photos or videos, or engaging in online harassment through social media platforms. The anonymity and ease of communication provided by digital platforms make it easier for perpetrators to target their victims without immediate consequences. Victims of cyberbullying often experience emotional distress, anxiety, depression, and even thoughts of self-harm. In some extreme cases, cyberbullying has tragically led to suicide. Educational institutions and organizations are increasingly implementing awareness campaigns and anti-cyberbullying policies to address this issue and provide support to victims. Legally, cyberbullying is a complex issue, as it often overlaps with freedom of speech concerns. While some states have enacted specific laws to combat cyberbullying, the legal framework is still evolving to keep pace with technological advancements.

While the term "cyberbullying" itself is relatively new, the underlying behavior has existed for as long as communication technologies have been accessible to individuals. The rise of the internet and social media platforms in the late 20th century provided new avenues for individuals to connect and communicate. However, it also created opportunities for malicious individuals to engage in online harassment, intimidation, and humiliation. The anonymity and perceived distance offered by online platforms have amplified the reach and severity of bullying behaviors. The historical context of cyberbullying also involves the increasing prevalence of smartphones, which have made access to the internet and social media more widespread. The ubiquity of digital devices has blurred the boundaries between online and offline worlds, making it challenging for individuals, particularly young people, to escape the negative effects of cyberbullying.

Harassment: This involves repeatedly sending offensive, threatening, or derogatory messages to an individual. It may include insults, slurs, or hate speech. Public Shaming: Cyberbullies may publicly humiliate or embarrass their victims by sharing personal information, sensitive photos or videos without consent, or spreading rumors online. Cyberstalking: In this form, individuals are repeatedly and obsessively followed or monitored online. Cyberstalkers may track their victims' online activities, gather personal information, or engage in intrusive behaviors. Exclusion and Social Manipulation: Cyberbullies may intentionally exclude or isolate individuals from online communities or social circles. They may spread rumors to damage their victim's reputation or manipulate social relationships. Impersonation: Cyberbullies may create fake profiles or accounts to impersonate their victims and engage in harmful behavior. This can lead to identity theft, reputation damage, and further harassment. Online Hate Groups: Certain online communities or forums may promote hate speech, discrimination, or harassment against specific individuals or groups. These groups may amplify the impact of cyberbullying through collective targeting.

1. Anonymity and Distance 2. Power Imbalance 3. Lack of Empathy 4. Reinforcement and Validation 5. Availability of Technology 6. Peer Influence

1. Emotional Distress 2. Academic Consequences 3. Social Isolation 4. Physical Health Issues 5. Risky Behaviors 6. Long-Term Psychological Effects

Films: Movies like "Cyberbully" (2011) and "Disconnect" (2012) explore the emotional turmoil and psychological effects of cyberbullying on individuals. They aim to convey the harsh realities and consequences of online harassment. Television Shows: TV series such as "13 Reasons Why" (2017-2020) and "Black Mirror" (2011-present) have episodes addressing cyberbullying and its implications. They portray the power dynamics, anonymity, and long-lasting effects of online harassment. Documentaries: Documentaries like "Bully" (2011) provide an in-depth examination of real-life cases, highlighting the experiences of both victims and perpetrators. They create a platform for open discussions and inspire action against cyberbullying.

1. According to a study by the National Center for Education Statistics, approximately 15% of students in the United States have reported being cyberbullied. 2. Cyberbullying often involves anonymous perpetrators who hide behind online identities, making it challenging to identify and hold them accountable for their actions. 3. Research shows that victims of cyberbullying are more likely to experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. They may also be at a higher risk of suicidal ideation. 4. While cyberbullying is commonly associated with teenagers, it can occur among adults as well. Studies have shown that cyberbullying affects individuals of various age groups, including children, adolescents, and even professionals in the workplace. 5. Unlike traditional bullying, cyberbullying can have a prolonged impact on victims. Hurtful messages and images can be shared and distributed rapidly, leaving a lasting digital footprint that can haunt victims for years. 6. Many instances of cyberbullying involve bystanders who witness the harassment but choose not to intervene or report it. Bystanders can play a crucial role in preventing and stopping cyberbullying by speaking up and supporting the victim. 7. Research suggests that certain social media platforms, such as Instagram and Snapchat, are more commonly associated with cyberbullying incidents. The anonymity, accessibility, and wide reach of these platforms contribute to the prevalence of online harassment. 8. In many jurisdictions, cyberbullying is considered a criminal offense. Laws and regulations have been implemented to address cyberbullying, and perpetrators can face legal consequences, including fines and imprisonment.

The topic of cyberbullying is of utmost importance to write an essay about due to its significant impact on individuals, especially in the digital age we live in today. Cyberbullying has emerged as a pervasive form of harassment, affecting people across various age groups, from children to adults. Understanding and addressing this issue is crucial for several reasons. Firstly, cyberbullying can have severe emotional and psychological consequences on victims. It can lead to anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, and even suicidal ideation. By exploring the psychological effects, an essay can shed light on the urgency of providing support systems and intervention strategies for those affected. Secondly, the internet and social media platforms have become an integral part of our lives, making cyberbullying a widespread concern. Investigating the topic can provide insights into the dynamics of online interactions and help identify effective prevention and intervention measures. Lastly, cyberbullying raises important ethical and legal questions. Understanding the ethical implications of online behavior and the legal frameworks surrounding cyberbullying can contribute to the development of policies and regulations that protect individuals and promote responsible digital citizenship.

1. Campbell, M. A. (2005). Cyber bullying: An old problem in a new guise?. Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools, 15(1), 68-76. (https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-psychologists-and-counsellors-in-schools/article/abs/cyber-bullying-an-old-problem-in-a-new-guise/6BACCB0B9F027416CB527B72421C3EEC) 2. Fauman, M. A. (2008). Cyber bullying: Bullying in the digital age. American Journal of Psychiatry, 165(6), 780-781. (https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.2008.08020226) 3. Mishna, F., Saini, M., & Solomon, S. (2009). Ongoing and online: Children and youth's perceptions of cyber bullying. Children and Youth Services Review, 31(12), 1222-1228. (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0190740909001200) 4. Slonje, R., & Smith, P. K. (2008). Cyberbullying: Another main type of bullying?. Scandinavian journal of psychology, 49(2), 147-154. (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2007.00611.x) 5. Smith, P. K., Del Barrio, C., & Tokunaga, R. S. (2012). Definitions of bullying and cyberbullying: How useful are the terms?. In Principles of cyberbullying research (pp. 26-40). Routledge. (https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9780203084601-5/definitions-bullying-cyberbullying-peter-smith-cristina-del-barrio-robert-tokunaga) 6. Gardner, D., O’Driscoll, M., Cooper-Thomas, H. D., Roche, M., Bentley, T., Catley, B., ... & Trenberth, L. (2016). Predictors of workplace bullying and cyber-bullying in New Zealand. International journal of environmental research and public health, 13(5), 448. (https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/13/5/448) 7. Hamm, M. P., Newton, A. S., Chisholm, A., Shulhan, J., Milne, A., Sundar, P., ... & Hartling, L. (2015). Prevalence and effect of cyberbullying on children and young people: A scoping review of social media studies. JAMA pediatrics, 169(8), 770-777. (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2337786) 8. Yao, M., Chelmis, C., & Zois, D. S. (2019, May). Cyberbullying ends here: Towards robust detection of cyberbullying in social media. In The World Wide Web Conference (pp. 3427-3433). (https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10.1145/3308558.3313462) 9. Lowry, P. B., Zhang, J., Wang, C., & Siponen, M. (2016). Why do adults engage in cyberbullying on social media? An integration of online disinhibition and deindividuation effects with the social structure and social learning model. Information Systems Research, 27(4), 962-986. (https://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/isre.2016.0671) 10. Samghabadi, N. S., Monroy, A. P. L., & Solorio, T. (2020, May). Detecting early signs of cyberbullying in social media. In Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Trolling, Aggression and Cyberbullying (pp. 144-149). (https://aclanthology.org/2020.trac-1.23/)

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78 Cyber Bullying Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

🏆 best cyber bullying topic ideas & essay examples, 💡 interesting topics to write about cyber bullying, 👍 good essay topics on cyber bullying, ❓ questions about cyberbullying research.

  • Ethical Case: Facebook Gossip or Cyberbullying? The best option to Paige is to apologize publicly and withdraw her comments. The final stage is to act and reflect the outcome of the choice made.
  • The Effects of Cyber-Bullying and Cyber-Stalking on the Society In particular, one should focus on such issues as the disrespect for a person’s autonomy, the growing intensity of domestic violence and deteriorating mental health in the country. We will write a custom essay specifically for you by our professional experts 808 writers online Learn More
  • Cyber Bullying as a Virtual Menace The use of information and communication technologies to support a deliberate and most of the time repeated hostile behavior by an individual or groups of people with the sole intention of harming others, one is […]
  • Is Cyber Bullying Against Teenagers More Detrimental Than Face-To-Face Bullying? Social networking has also contributed greatly to the issue of cyber bullying especially in making it more harmful as compared to face-to-face bullying.
  • Cyber Bullying Issue Therefore, the goal of this paper is to analyse who the victims of cyber bullying are and the influence it has on them.
  • Ethics in Technology: Cyber Crimes Furthermore, the defendant altered the data, which compromised the integrity of the information to the detriment of the organizations involved. In this litigation, Aleksey Vladimirovich Ivanov was the defendant while the American government was the […]
  • Cyber Bullying and Its Forms The difference between the conventional way of bullying and cyber bullying is that in conventional bullying, there is contact between the bully and the victim.
  • Discouraging and Eliminating Cyber Bullying Resources Role of the resource/input Statement forms To facilitate information transfer to the staff Counseling Personnel To arm students against the problem Bullying report system To create efficient internet enhance report system Regulation implementation documents […]
  • Cyber Bullying Prevention in Learning Institutions: Systematic Approach To start with, the students are provided with ways of reporting their concern to the educational institution, and when the staff members of the institution receive the report, they evaluate the information together with the […]
  • Cyber Bullying Reduction Program Table of Activities Activity Significance Assembling parents/guardians, students and teachers to announce and explain the program in the institution To enlighten parents/guardians, students and teachers about the rules and regulation enacted due to the threat […]
  • Cyber Bullying and Positivist Theory of Crime Learning theory approaches to the explanation of criminal behavior have been associated with one of the major sociological theories of crime, the differential association theory.
  • Freedom Of Speech In The Era Of Cyber Bullying
  • The Negative Impacts of Technology on Social Skills: Anxiety, Awkward Conversations, Cyber Bullying, and Lack of Awareness
  • Different Consequences of Cyber Bullying in School
  • The Study Of Cyber Bullying Victimization On Children Who Are Addicted To The Internet
  • The Causes and Harmful Effects of Cyber Bullying
  • Why Do Cyber Bullying Laws Need to Be Enforced
  • Unsecured Privacy Settings, Cyber Bullying, And Facebook Crime
  • Bullying Carried too Far: Cyber Bullying and Violent Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying: Misuse of Information and Communications Technology
  • Cyber Bullying and Why Parents Need to Monitor Their Children’s Activity
  • The Detrimental Effects of Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying, Its Forms, Impact, and Relationship to Juvenile Delinquency
  • How Cyber Bullying Affects Our Lives Negatively
  • The Effects Of Cyber Bullying On Substance Use And Mental Health
  • Cyberbullying : Causes And Dangers Of Cyber Bullying
  • The Effects Of Cyber Bullying On The Mental Health Of Middle School Aged Youth
  • Is Cyber Bullying Morally Justifiable
  • Cyber Bullying And Its Effect On Our Youth
  • An Analysis of Cyber Bullying in Today’s World
  • Cyber Bullying And Its Effect On The Lives Of The American
  • Bullying And The Potential Motives Behind Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying And Its Various Forms
  • Bullying In The Digital Age: Electronic Or Cyber Bullying
  • Information Technology – Role of Social Networking Cites in Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying : A Consistent Problem For Young People
  • Cause And Effect Of Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying, Creating a Culture of Respect
  • Cyber Bullying And Its Effect On Adolescents
  • Prevention And Intervention Of Cyber Bullying
  • Investigating Cyber Bullying Using Social Media
  • Cyber Bullying Affects People ‘s Lives More Than One Might Think
  • The Cyber Crime and the Cyber Bullying
  • The Cause of Cyber Bullying and the Effect of the Mental Development of Teenagers
  • Cyber Bullying: An Uncontrollable Epidemic
  • The Psychological Impact of Cyber Bullying
  • The Eternal Effects Of Cyber Bullying
  • Cyber Bullying : Bullying Through Technology
  • Why Does Online Anonymity Increase Cyberbullying Among Teenagers?
  • Are Laws Effective Strategy Address Issue Cyberbullying?
  • Are Schools Doing Enough About Cyberbullying?
  • What Are the Causes of Cyberbullying?
  • What Is the Prevention of Cyberbullying?
  • Is Cyberbullying Related to a Lack of Empathy and Social-Emotional Problems?
  • How Often Do Celebrities Suffer From Cyberbullying?
  • What Are the Characteristics of Cyberbullying Among Students?
  • How Does Social Integration of Children Help to Combat Cyberbullying?
  • What Is the Correlation Between Suicide Rates and Cyberbullying?
  • How Does Cyberbullying Affect Society?
  • What Is the Correlation Between Depression, Bullying and Cyberbullying?
  • Are There Gender Differences in Cyberbullying?
  • What Is the Criminal Penalty for Cyberbullying?
  • What International Associations Prevent Cyberbullying?
  • What Is the Role of Affective and Cognitive Empathy in Cyberbullying?
  • What Are the Solutions to Cyberbullying?
  • Can Cyberbullying Be Called Cyber Crime?
  • What Is the Role of Teachers in Preventing Cyberbullying?
  • Can Internet Privacy Be Enough to Prevent Cyberbullying?
  • How Does Cyberbullying Affect Children?
  • How Many American Teenagers Are Cyberbullied?
  • How Does Cyberbullying Affect Mental Health?
  • How Is Cyberbullying Different From Physical Bullying?
  • Is Cyberbullying an Example of Psychological Abuse?
  • Can School Policies Reduce Cyberbullying?
  • How Does Cyberbullying Affect Teenagers’ Self-Esteem?
  • What Are the Consequences of Cyberbullying?
  • Has the Proliferation of Social Media Led to an Increase in Cyberbullying?
  • Is Cyberbullying Less Criminal Than Traditional Bullying?
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Essay on Cyber Bullying

Students are often asked to write an essay on Cyber Bullying in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Cyber Bullying

Understanding cyber bullying.

Cyber bullying is a type of bullying done through digital platforms. It includes sending, posting, or sharing negative content that harms others.

Impact of Cyber Bullying

It can cause emotional distress. Victims may feel sad, angry, or scared, and it can affect their school work.

Preventing Cyber Bullying

To prevent cyber bullying, don’t respond or forward harmful messages. Always report bullying to adults or the platform where it happened.

Cyber bullying is harmful. It’s important to stand against it and support victims.

Also check:

  • Paragraph on Cyber Bullying

250 Words Essay on Cyber Bullying

Introduction.

Cyberbullying, a modern form of harassment, has emerged with the advent of innovative communication technologies. This digital form of bullying is characterized by the intent to cause emotional distress and the repeated use of communication tools to harm others.

The Prevalence of Cyberbullying

The ubiquity of the internet and the proliferation of social media platforms have exacerbated the prevalence of cyberbullying. It has become an alarming issue, particularly among younger demographics, due to its detrimental psychological effects, including anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts.

Understanding the Mechanisms

Cyberbullies exploit the anonymity of the internet, which emboldens them to launch attacks without fear of immediate repercussion. The absence of face-to-face interaction desensitizes them to the emotional harm they inflict, making it a pervasive problem.

Preventive Measures and Solutions

Addressing cyberbullying requires a multifaceted approach. Education about digital citizenship, empathy, and the potential harm caused by cyberbullying, are crucial. Additionally, the implementation of strict policies and laws can deter potential cyberbullies.

Cyberbullying is a pressing issue in our digital society. It necessitates collective efforts from educators, parents, policymakers, and internet users to create a safer online environment. By fostering awareness, understanding, and empathy, we can mitigate the effects of cyberbullying and build a more respectful digital community.

500 Words Essay on Cyber Bullying

Introduction to cyber bullying.

Cyber bullying is a modern form of bullying that takes place over digital devices like cell phones, computers, and tablets. It can occur through text messages, social media, or online platforms that allow digital communication. Cyber bullying includes sending, posting, or sharing negative, harmful, false, or mean content about someone else, often to cause embarrassment or humiliation.

The Prevalence of Cyber Bullying

As technology advances and becomes increasingly integrated into our daily lives, the prevalence of cyber bullying has risen significantly. The anonymity provided by the internet often emboldens individuals to engage in destructive behavior without fear of immediate consequences. In fact, according to a study conducted by the Cyberbullying Research Center, approximately 34% of students have experienced cyber bullying during their lifetime.

The Impact of Cyber Bullying

The impact of cyber bullying on the mental health of victims can be devastating. It can lead to anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. Unlike traditional bullying, cyber bullying can be relentless and ubiquitous, with victims unable to escape their tormentors even within the safety of their own homes. The harmful effects can extend beyond the individual and impact their families and communities.

Preventing and Combating Cyber Bullying

Preventing and combating cyber bullying requires a multi-faceted approach. Education is a crucial aspect of prevention. By educating students, parents, and educators about the risks and consequences of cyber bullying, we can foster a safer online environment.

Additionally, legislation plays a critical role in combating this issue. Many countries have enacted laws to address cyber bullying, but enforcement remains a challenge due to the global nature of the internet.

The Role of Social Media Platforms

Social media platforms also have a responsibility to combat cyber bullying. They can do this by implementing stricter community guidelines, developing effective reporting systems, and using advanced algorithms to detect and remove harmful content.

In conclusion, cyber bullying is a pervasive issue that has been amplified by the digital age. It is a complex problem that requires a comprehensive solution involving education, legislation, and active participation from social media platforms. By working together, we can create a safer online environment and mitigate the harmful effects of cyber bullying.

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Chapter 1: Introduction

Drishti Sharma; Nandini Sharma; and Ritika Bakshi

As access to digital technologies increases rapidly worldwide, it brings risks alongside enormous benefits, especially for the children and adolescents. The magnitude of online risks like cyberbullying is growing across the world, and India is no exception. Studies across the globe suggest that use of electronic communication technologies has a significant impact on the mental, physical and social health of adolescents. Therefore, understanding and mitigating online risks is crucial. This requires a shared understanding of online risks amongst the key stakeholders to work collaboratively to promote well-being of youth in an increasingly digital world. The socio-ecological model provides a framework that can organize important protective and risk factors for preventing cyberbullying and other online threats. These factors are located within multiple systems that constantly interact, broadly involving the youth, their families, peers and schools, communities, and society.

In this chapter, we introduce cyberbullying and other online risks faced by adolescents as well as the overall opportunities offered by digital media, particularly in the developing world. By mitigating the threats, we can avoid the increasing digital divide and ensure continued healthy youth development. We explore what cyberbullying is, the magnitude of the problem, and its harmful impacts. We will also briefly introduce the landscape we intend to cover through this book using the framework of the socio-ecological model. Our goal is to make this information accessible for the use of Indian stakeholders who are invested in preventing cyberbullying and promoting adolescents’ digital citizenship. Throughout the book, we draw insights from scientific work across the globe and apply them to India’s current policy ecosystem.

INDIAN CONTEXT

India is home to 1.3 billion people. [1] It has the largest adolescent population globally. [2] According to the 2011 census, 83% of India’s population lives in rural areas. Despite the record economic growth, literacy remains low. In the 2011 census, 73% of the population was literate. Literacy for girls and women is much lower (64.6%) as compared to boys and men (80.9%).

The World Bank classifies India as a low-middle income economy. Its health system is constrained, with a reported 0.53 hospital beds per 1000 people in 2017. [3] Further, it falls in the low density of healthcare workers, with 0.3 psychiatrists and 0.05 psychologists per 100,000 people. [4]

As with many other low-income countries, in India, the digital revolution skipped the phase of computers and laptops. This means that many households owned mobile devices as their first digital device. In India, in 2019, one in three individuals of age 12 years and above had access to internet. Of these users, 32% were within the age group of 12-19 years. [5] This suggests that adolescents are disproportionately more likely to have access to the Internet compared to adults and older adults. Also, our focus groups with stakeholders revealed that the sharing of electronic communication devices is prevalent within Indian families. The latest IAMAI report stated, “While internet users grew by 4% in urban India reaching 323 million users in 2020, digital adoption continues to be propelled by rural India – registering a 13% growth in internet users over the past year”. [6]

Digital technology has already changed the world. As more and more children have access to the technology, it is increasingly changing the dynamics of the childhood as well. If leveraged strategically and made universally accessible, digital technology can be a game changer for children who are left behind.

In this book we make a case for faster action, focused investment and greater cooperation to protect children from the harms of a more connected world. Along with this, we also focus on harnessing the opportunities of the digital age to benefit every child. [7] Strategic planning is critically relevant for India. If action is not taken soon enough, digital divide will continue to magnify the prevailing economic gaps. This will in turn amplify the advantages of children from wealthier backgrounds and fail to deliver opportunities to the poorest and the underprivileged children.

OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED BY DIGITAL MEDIA

Internet connectivity has ushered in knowledge transfer at a scale which was earlier unknown and unimaginable. Bill Gates once said, “The internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow.”

Children and adolescents around the world have embraced technology with ease. They have created new spaces for social interactions. Indeed, the advances have been so rapid that parents and caregivers often struggle to keep up. [8] Digitalization offers seemingly limitless opportunities. It allows children to connect with friends and make decisions for themselves. It gives access to education, which is especially important for those living in remote or marginalized areas. Countless stories and examples illustrate how children worldwide have utilized the digital technologies to learn, socialize, and shape their paths into adulthood. For instance, in Brazil, the Amazon state government’s educational initiative has provided educational content since 2007 to children and youth living remotely. Classes are taught by teachers in rural communities using satellite television. In addition to printed resources, they also have access to digital textbooks and other educational resources through the internet. [9]

Skills and vocational training programs are yet another domain where digital connectivity is opening opportunities to learn. This is particularly true for children hailing from very low- income families. Such children often leave formal schooling to earn livelihood. In Kampala, Uganda, the ‘Women in Technology’ organization offers digital vocational training for young women in under-served communities. The organization teaches young women digital, leadership and life skills. Girls attending the program have reported learning entrepreneurship skills and the use of the internet to identify their business opportunities. [10] Such initiatives of providing access to technology strategically has fostered better educational and economic opportunities to the vulnerable communities.

In addition, digital access is vital during emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Online web-based learning or e-learning played a major role in making the teaching-learning process more student-centered, innovative, and flexible, when the schools and colleges were shut down across the world. [11]

DIGITAL ACCESS DIVIDE

Greater online connectivity has opened new avenues for civic engagement, social inclusion and other opportunities, with the potential to break cycles of poverty and disadvantage. However, disparities in access to internet services vary between groups depending upon income, family education and literacy, and urbanicity/rurality. To be specific, 81 percent of people in developed countries use the internet, while only 40 percent of the people use internet in developing countries. In least developing countries the number is even lower at 15 percent. [12] GSM Association (GSMA) survey in 2015 found that in low- and middle-income countries, various socio-economic and cultural barriers tend to keep girls and women from using mobile phones. [13] Such barriers include social norms, education levels, lack of technical literacy and decision-making, employment and income, etc. The National Family Health Survey-5 (NFHS5) reports suggest that gender disparities in usage of internet in India are greater across the rural areas than urban regions.  These findings highlight that the gender disparities in the offline world are significantly reflected in the online world as well. [14]

But unless we reduce the disparities, digital technology may create new divides that prevent children from fulfilling their potential. If we don’t act now to keep pace with rapid change, online risks may make vulnerable children more susceptible to exploitation, abuse and even trafficking. It may also result in more subtle threats to their well-being. [15]

DIGITAL RISKS AND SAFETY

Online risks among adolescents are of four kinds [16] —

  • Cyberbullying or online harassment
  • Sexual solicitation and risky sexual behaviors
  • Exposure to explicit content
  • Information breaches and privacy violations

We elaborate on cyberbullying prevention and response in Chapter 1, 2, 3 and 4.  Further, in Chapter 5, we place cyberbullying in the broader context of online digital safety. In Chapter 6, we identify the possible platforms in the Indian policy landscape that can be leveraged to address the situation.

Throughout the book, we make a case for using a common approach of resilience-based frameworks to address all kinds of digital risks.  Digital resilience means empowering children to become active, aware, and ethical digital citizens. It requires building capacity to safely navigate the digital world. [17] This approach strikes a balance between teen’s privacy and online safety through active communication and fostering trust between parents and children. It stands in contrast to the current “risk-averse” approach to online safety. This approach emphasizes on protecting adolescents from being exposed to online risks. The underlying fear often culminates in actions that restrict access to electronic communication technologies for youth. It often includes privacy-invasive monitoring. We suggest that this response is ineffective because no matter how much restrictions we place, just as in everyday life, a zero-risk digital environment is unattainable. We have already elaborated on how online interactions can provide social support, belonging, education, entertainment, and other positive conditions for healthy youth development. Online safety therefore, should maximize the benefits of the internet while mitigating some of its unintended consequences. [18]

WHAT IS CYBERBULLYING?

Bullying is a type of aggressive behavior that is traditionally defined as “intentional, repeated negative (unpleasant or hurtful) behavior by one or more persons directed against a person who has difficulty defending himself or herself.” [19] Bullying can be perpetrated in-person or via electronic means. Cyber bullying or online bullying is a form of bullying or harassment using electronic communication technologies means. It includes direct messaging particularly through social media websites , and a range of electronic applications and other websites.

Cyberbullying is often understood as an extension of in-person bullying that occurs in schools. The definition of cyberbullying has been debated, but most definitions specify that cyberbullying is some type of aggression (e.g., harassment, bullying) that occurs through electronic communication technologies. [20]

Aggression among youth includes the following forms of aggression- physical, verbal and relational (or social). Physical aggression causes or threatens to cause physical harm. It may include behaviors such as hitting, kicking, tripping, pinching, pushing or damaging property. Verbal aggression, in contrast, targets a person’s sense of self, agency, or dignity. It includes name-calling, insults, teasing, intimidation, racist remarks, or verbal abuse. Relational or social aggression targets a person’s social relationships, status, image, or reputation. It includes lying, spreading rumors or embarrassing information, making rude or disrespectful negative facial or physical gestures, cracking jokes to embarrass and humiliate someone, mimicking unkindly. It also includes causing social isolation or exclusion, encouraging others to socially exclude someone and damaging someone’s social reputation or social acceptance. [21]

Unfortunately, increased access to the internet through the unmediated use of smartphones exposes children and adolescents to many online risks. Bullying has become a part of our routine interactions on platforms such as WhatsApp, SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook, TikTok, etc. Body-shaming goes unabated; false rumors spread unchecked; and morphed pictures or videos are shared with a limitless audience. Cyberbullying also offers anonymity to the perpetrators allowing them to continue bullying without any fear of the real-world consequences. These factors, combined with the lack of monitoring and regulation in cyberspace, makes the issue more intricate and challenging to address.

Although children are aware of the damage and profound harm that cyberbullying causes, they are not always immediately conscious of the long-term consequences of their actions. Further, though they have superior technological skills, they lack awareness about the need of appropriate protective measures when it comes to sharing personal information. They may not be able to distinguish between online and offline “friends”. Adults struggle to provide support to youth too. Cyberbullying does not require the physical presence of the victim. It is, by its very nature, a hidden kind of behavior. Often adults fail to detect and address cyberbullying, particularly when they take place in spaces beyond adult supervision. [22]

Despite the growing concern, the research on cyberbullying in India is at a nascent stage. A systematic review done by Thakkar et al. in 2020 reported there were very few scientific articles on the topic for a meaningful inference. [23] As with research, the practice of cyberbullying prevention faces challenges too. The point is driven home by a report commissioned by UNICEF to understand online child safety in India in 2016. The report reveals that despite provisions in legislation and policies in India, there is a general lack of understanding of professionals, policymakers, and society of the risks and threats posed to children by information and communication technology (ICT) and social media. [24] Despite the limitation, the urgency of equipping stakeholders with information is clear. Therefore, throughout the book, we attempt to synthesize the available literature to draw actionable inferences for the Indian context.

With the rising internet usage, the rate of cyberbullying incidents is likely to increase in the years to come. Globally, current prevalence estimates for cyberbullying victimization range between approximately 10 and 40 percent. The wide range suggests that estimates of the burden of cyberbullying victimization varies across studies. The variation is attributed to several factors- the manner in which cyberbullying is defined (for a more detailed discussion of this issue, see Chapter 2), differences in the ages and locations of the individuals sampled, the reporting time frame being assessed (e.g., lifetime, 2 months, 6 months), and the frequency rate by which a person is classified as a perpetrator or victim (e.g., at least once, several times a week). [25] Despite the varying estimates, data consistently indicate that a considerable number of youngsters are being cyberbullied across the globe. [26]

Majority of the incidents of cyberbullying are subtle (less harmful). [27] Some, however, cross the line into unlawful or criminal behavior. For instance, cases of cyber stalking or bullying of children rose from 40 in 2018 to 140 in 2020, as reported by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) of India. [28] , [29] These criminal cases essentially represent the tip of the iceberg and reports indicate an increasing trend of such episodes. Also, for every serious case reported, many relatively low-risk incidents of risk exposure go unreported. Clearly, we can respond well to these low-risk exposures by empowering teens with necessary technical and socio-emotional coping skills to avoid catastrophic consequences. [30]

The research also suggests that parents and teachers are often in the dark, unaware of bullying experiences of youth. [31] Youth who face cyberbullying, hesitate to confide in their elders or caregivers due to the perception of the lack of technical know-how amongst elders and fear of losing access to their devices. [32] Hence, surveys that measure children’s self-reports of such incidents are a valuable source of measuring the burden.

As per an Indian survey conducted in 2012, eight percent of 174 youth in Delhi ever perpetrated cyberbullying, and 17 percent reported being victimized. The percentage of boys who were victimized exceeded the percentage of girls. The rate of cyberbullying perpetration was comparable across gender. When the exposure to such events is compared with global figures, we find comparable rates across gender. We suspect that India’s cultural factors and gender roles contribute to limited access to mobile devices for girls thus resulting in lower exposure to such events. That is, limited access may explain the anomaly of higher incidence of victimization among boys. [33] However, a systematic enquiry linking gender and digital access with cyberbullying behavior is required to verify this hypothesis. Also, it is worth reiterating that lower access may drive other socio-economic disadvantages. In this case, limited access due to the risk of exposure to cyberbullying or other digital risks may result in the child losing many opportunities for growth and development.

In Ahmedabad, Gujarat, in 2017, a study was conducted on 240 respondents (120 boys and 120 girls) aged 12-17 years, from standard VII to XII.  The findings indicate that nearly 14 percent of respondents reported cyberbullying in their lifetime and seven percent reported cyberbullying involvement in the last thirty days.

Likewise, Microsoft Corporation conducted the ‘Global Youth Online Behavior Survey’, in 2012 on the phenomenon of online bullying. Survey was conducted with 7,644 youth aged eight to seventeen years in twenty-five countries (approximately 300 respondents per country), including six Asian nations. Of the 25 countries surveyed, the three countries in which participants reported the highest rates of online bullying victimization were China (70%), Singapore (58%), and India (53%). Other Asian countries in the study reported the following percentages of online bullying: Malaysia, 33%; Pakistan, 26%; and Japan, 17%. The same three countries with the highest rates of online bullying victimization also reported the highest rates of having bullied someone online- China (58%), India (50%), and Singapore (46%). [34]

Further, in 2020, Child Rights and You (CRY), a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), reported around 9.2% of 630 adolescents surveyed in Delhi-National Capital Region (NCR) had experienced cyberbullying. Half of them had not reported it to teachers or guardians of the social media companies concerned. [35]

Notably, these surveys were not representative of national-level estimates. Further information on rates disaggregated across sub-groups, e.g., gender, developmental age-groups, socio-economic class, caste, color, rural or urban residence, ethnicities or region of origin, language, disability, sexual orientation, school-going or out-of-school is yet to be studied.

Some victims of cyberbullying are not upset or disturbed. However, cyberbullying is often associated with many emotional and psychological conditions, including stress, lower self-esteem, and life satisfaction, [36] with far-reaching effects during adolescence and adulthood. Most of the scientific literature reporting the impact of cyberbullying is cross-sectional (i.e., the behavior and its impact is reported at the same instance among individuals), and to establish temporal relationships and potential causal inferences, more longitudinal studies (where subjects are followed over time to study the outcome of a certain behavior) are required. Like the burden estimates, evidence from representative surveys measuring the impact of cyberbullying among adolescents is nearly absent in the Indian context. Therefore, we would try to draw from global literature and as much as possible from comparable regions.

In 2014, Kowalski et al. published a meta-analysis of cyberbullying research among youth, including 131 studies mainly from the developed world. These studies have linked cyberbullying involvement as a victim or perpetrator to substance use; mental health symptoms, e.g., anxiety and depression; decreased self-esteem and self-worth; low self-control; suicidal ideation; poor physical health (difficulty sleeping, recurrent abdominal pain and frequent headaches); increased likelihood of self-injury; and loneliness. Furthermore, victims of cyberbullying are much more likely to be bullied in person when compared to non-victims. [37]

Additionally, both youth who experience cyberbullying victimization and perpetration are more likely to experience poor performance at school and in the workplace as compared to youth who are not involved in cyberbullying. They reported absenteeism, lower grades and poor concentration. Victims are also more likely to face detentions and suspensions, incidences of truancy, and carrying weapons. [38]

Ruangnapakul et al., in 2019, conducted a systematic review of studies from South Asian countries, i.e. Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines.  The review revealed that cyberbullying behavior (perpetration or victimization) is common among adolescents in these countries. One of the studies from Philippines noted the association of cyberbullying with unpleasant and uncomfortable feelings. Another study from Malaysia reported that cyberbullying was associated with negative academic and emotional outcomes. The review revealed that there were few (not many) studies on cyberbullying in the Southeast Asian region. The issue needs further systematic enquiry. Since most of the studies were cross-sectional, they mainly report associations and not temporality (e.g., which came first- poor adjustment and functioning, or cyberbullying?) which would require longitudinal studies. [39]

Bullying among youth is costly not just for individuals and families but also for countries. Understanding the economic cost and impacts associated with bullying is critical for any country. Such data informs the design of appropriate evidence-informed programs and prevention measures to reduce its occurrence. To move in this direction, India needs to conduct surveys and ensure availability of administrative data with trends to allow estimates of bullying prevalence and consequences. [40]

Reports from elsewhere suggest alarming costs. For instance, youth violence in Brazil alone is estimated to cost nearly $19 billion per year, of which $943 million can be linked to violence in schools. A report commissioned by Australia’s Alannah and Madeline Foundation suggests the costs of bullying victims and perpetrators into adulthood is $1.8 billion over a 20 years period. This includes the costs of bullying for all school students during school as well as long-term impacts after school. [41]

Cyberbullying is a global problem that affects youth’s mental, socio-economic, psychological, and physical health. This requires a multi-disciplinary, cross-cultural and holistic approach to address the issue through programs focused on students and school personnel, parents, health professionals and the wider community. The more extensive ecological system comprising parents, teachers, various stakeholders like media, law enforcement, health professionals, policymakers, and youth themselves all need to work in active collaboration to deal with the problem of cyberbullying. In this context, the social-ecological model proposed by the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for violence prevention is useful and merits discussion.

A FRAMEWORK FOR PREVENTION

Through this book, we aim to empower stakeholders who perform an essential role in the dynamic play of factors that lead to cyberbullying. Knowing the range of actors and factors is critical to prevent and respond to the risk. We use a four-level social-ecological model proposed by CDC (Refer Figure 1) to understand violence and the effectiveness of potential prevention strategies. This model considers the complex interplay between individual, relationship, community, and societal levels leading to interpersonal-violence. It allows us to understand the determinants at each level that put individuals at risk for violence or protect them from experiencing the violence.

Figure 1: The Social-Ecological Model: A Framework for Prevention

The model also explains how the factors at one level influence factors at another level, which requires action across multiple levels of the model at the same time to achieve population-level impact. [42] , [43] Throughout the book, we utilize the socio-ecological framework to understand cyberbullying among youth.

The model is understood through four concentric circles. The innermost circle is the one closest to the individual and the outermost circle is the most distant, yet influential at the societal level. The individual level identifies biological, individual characteristics and personal history factors. These factors often increase the probability of becoming a victim or perpetrator of violence. Some of these factors include age, education, family income, impulsivity, or history of adversity such as abuse.

The next level moves out of the individual and examines close relationships. Some close relationships may increase the risk of experiencing cyberbullying as a victim or perpetrator of cyberbullying. For instance, an individual’s family members influence their behavior and contribute to their risk of or protection against cyberbullying. Also, peers play a critical role in influencing children’s behavior, attitude, thinking and judgment.

This model at third level, the community level, explores settings, such as schools, workplaces, and neighborhoods. In some settings in which social relationships develop may contribute towards factors that are associated with victimization or perpetration of cyberbullying.

The fourth level looks at the broad societal factors that help create an environment in which violence is either encouraged or discouraged. These factors include political, social and cultural norms of the society in which we live. They also include various factors that help to maintain economic or social inequalities among different groups of the society.

In the following chapters, we have elaborated upon risk and protective factors of cyberbullying using the socio-ecological framework described above. The framework also helps understand the preventive strategies with a systems lens. We use insights gained from review of scientific and grey literature, policy documents and discussions held with youth, teachers, parents, health care providers and policy actors during workshops.

Chapter Two emphasizes the importance of a solid understanding of how best to measure cyberbullying within and across cultural contexts. We review the existing measures of cyberbullying in South Asia and provide guidance on measure development for researchers to generate ecologically valid measures of cyberbullying.

Chapter Three covers individual level determinants, relationships with peers and their effect on cyberbullying behavior. This chapter also conveys the role of school as a community level organization in preventing cyberbullying. Understanding school-and peer-level factors is important in preventing cyberbullying events and mitigating its potentially harmful impacts. By far these are the most studied factors addressed in interventions to prevent cyberbullying.

Chapter Four addresses parents’ and caregivers’ needs for guidance and reassurance on how best maintain their children’s safety online and protect against cyberbullying. We emphasize the importance of parent-child communication, warm parent-child relationships, and parental monitoring that supports adolescents’ search for autonomy. In short, this chapter details the role of family, especially parental relationships and media parenting with respect to cyberbullying behavior among youth.

Chapter Five focuses on the broader research areas of digital risks and online safety. We discuss the three primary types of risks that adolescents navigate in digitally mediated environments that extend beyond cyberbullying – online sexual solicitations and risk behaviors, exposure to explicit content, and information breaches and privacy violations. We advocate for a resilience-based, rather than an abstinence-only approach to online safety. Once again, this chapter focuses on the first two levels of the socio-ecological model; individual and relationship level.

Chapter Six addresses the more distal societal level factors identified by the model. We summarize how the current knowledge can be applied in India across multiple stakeholder groups, including public policy, law enforcement, school administration, health care providers, community-based organizations, tech industry, and research institutes. Also, we highlight the key gaps in knowledge to guide future research.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Increasing digital access enables education, socialization and entertainment among youth thus offering the most marginalized an opportunity to come out of poverty.
  • Though digital access has improved worldwide, there remains inequality in access, particularly for children, especially girls from low-income families in the rural areas.
  • Children all around the world are adapting these technologies at earlier ages and are far more adept than their parents in using them.
  • Online risks are a reality of current connected work. Children, specifically, are exposed to the risk of cyberbullying, online harassment, sexual solicitation and risky sexual behaviors, exposure to explicit content, information breaches and privacy violations.
  • According to existing literature, cyberbullying rates reported among youth in India range from 5% to 53% based on different studies. This is similar to rates reported elsewhere in developing settings and worldwide.
  • The cyberbullying studies undertaken in India have methodological weaknesses such as unavailability of data pertaining to sub-groups. More information at the national level is required to inform policies and action on response.
  • Cyberbullying and cyber victimization are both associated with a range of poor outcomes, including depressive symptoms, low self-esteem, anxiety, loneliness, drug and alcohol use, low academic achievement, and low overall well-being. In addition, cyber victimization has been linked to somatic complaints, perceived stress, and suicide ideation. However, most of this research is cross-sectional, and longitudinal studies are recommended to identify the direction of relationship of these effects.
  • Nevertheless, the evidence of negative impacts of cyberbullying is sufficient to catalyze the policy ecosystem in India to prioritize digital safety and to strengthen systems to monitor, respond and prevent digital risks.
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Cyberbullying and Digital Safety: Applying Global Research to Youth in India Copyright © 2022 by Drishti Sharma; Nandini Sharma; and Ritika Bakshi is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Cyber bullying essay deals with a new take on bullying that is hard to detect and control. According to cyber bullying essays, it means harming, intimidating, or coercing someone through digital means of communication. All essays on cyber bullying explore its consequences. Cyber bullying can be very harmful to a person's mental health and state, self-esteem, anxiety, or even depression. In some ways, it is more dangerous than physical bullying and cyber bullies, unlike physical bullies, can act incognito and globally through the internet. According to statistics, over 35% of the population was at some point in their life victims of cyber bullying, and most of them – recently. Make the most of our cyber bullying essay samples – even small samples of informative essays can give you an idea of what to include.

This site addresses the topic of bullying on social media. The author has provided a thorough explanation of the vice and postulated a correlation between it and high school students and teachers in a school setting based on research-based results. Additionally, a list of social media abuse mitigating factors has...

Words: 4287

In the modern world, technology has transformed the way people communicate. Although there are numerous advantages to using technology, one of the most prominent disadvantages has been cyberbullying. It occurs as a result of electronic technology when devices like phones, tablets, laptops, and communication tools including social media platforms, messaging,...

Words: 2632

Cyber Protection Cyber protection refers to the whole mechanism that is intended to protect an information system from foreign intrusions such as threats and unauthorized access that could harm or reveal the information of a specific entity. In some circles, computer protection is often referred to as information security; thus, for...

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Facebook case Since a provider of an interactive computer service should be kept responsible for delivering speech online, Facebook is immune from responsibility for the content shared by third parties. Allowing users to leave comments on a page or publish something does not open a business to the risk of being...

Introduction As a social and contemporary factor that affects most youths today, this paper seeks a review article on Cyberbullying in College: Frequency, Characteristics, and Practical Implications. Cyberbullying has a significant negative impact on the lives of many teens, including depression. Study Description Cyberbullying in College: Frequency, Characteristics, and Practical Implications is a...

The Modern Day Bully The twenty first century bully is not your usual mean searching Joe at the end of the street block. The modern day bully is a faceless character hiding behind a keyboard. Cases of cyberbullying have steadily risen over the last decade to catastrophic levels. With the myriad...

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Cyber Bullying Essay Example

Apart from the other bullying issues of racism, colourism etc. in the school & colleges, there has been one severe issue of bullying arouse in the modern world with developing technology i.e. Cyber Bullying.

In today’s world which has made the world smaller with the emerging technologies, have also gave birth to some new-age problems. There is no doubt that there are numerous advantages of the technologies but it has also come up with some adverse effects. With all the benefits, it also gave birth to cyberbullying.

In simple words, Cyberbullying has come up from the technology in a form of misusing the  information technology  intending to harm or harass others.

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The aspiring and devoted Singaporean students who are pursuing IT courses,  Computer Science course programs come across the topic of cyberbullying and also along with the in-depth knowledge of every topic, they get assignments too for writing a cyber bullying essay.

Introduction to Cyber Bullying

Cyberbullying also called as cyber harassment is a form of threatening, bullying, harassing or intimidating someone by the means of some electronic devices. This is also known as online bullying. This is a kind of bullying using the digital platform, media or devices.

Cyberbullying doesn’t mandatorily mean by the hacking of someone’s a profile/ account or posing of being someone else. But cyberbullying takes place in various forms like texts through SMSs, online chat forums, game forums, posting negative comments about somebody on social networking sites, spreading any rumours in order to defame or humiliate someone are all considered as cyberbullying. It can be held on different digital devices like computers, cell phones & tablets etc. Any such inappropriate activity like sending, posting or sharing negative content which is not decent but means or obscene, and harmful by the means of these digital devices is called cyberbullying.

Cyberbullying has become very common in today’s world as everyone uses the social networking platforms and it becomes easy for one to misuse this access. This comprises of actions of humiliating, blackmailing, defame, manipulate or harass a person. Such antagonistic activities lead to severe damages for a person easily and in a bad manner.

Common types of Cyberbullying

Every “Any action performed through electronic or digital media by people or groups that convey antagonistic or offensive messages planned to cause damage or distress overtime against a person.”

Everyone should be aware of the cyberbullying activities so that suitable measures can be undertaken to prevent and confront them.

Here are some common types of cyberbullying: –

  • Flaming- using exasperating words against a person in an unfriendly manner
  • Impersonation- making fake accounts or accessing an individual’s actual social-media account and posting/ sharing things to spoil a person’s reputation
  • Harassment – regularly sending malevolent messages to a person
  • Doxing – posting personal information of an individual with an intention to defame, humiliate or harass the person
  • Denigration- spreading rumours or false facts about a person to spoil his image
  • Cyberstalking- online harassment & denigration which lead a person to fear for his safety like via threatening texts
  • Trickery- fooling someone to share his personal information and the sharing it on online platforms
  • Exclusion- excluding someone from an online group on a purpose
  • Outing- posting personal and embarrassing information of a person online

Who is a cyberbully?

A cyberbully is not always a stranger but it may also be some known of yours who might be having an intention to harm you. A cyberbully can be an online stranger but he can also be someone the victim knows.

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A cyber-bully is generally a person who is himself to a product of harassment or abused in some ways, verbally or physically, or might be cyberbullied by someone. Or possibly they can be someone simply bored or completely vile who want to disturb everyone’s life and make it messy.

Generally, cyberbullies work in a group as they feel safe and stronger in a team. In fact, many times they themselves have conflicts against each other but they cannot move apart due to safety reasons and a fear of getting cyberbullied themselves by someone.

As it is recognized by specialists, tormentors are usually gloomier than their victims. What’s more stressful for us is that the cyberbullies get the bogus sentiment of satisfaction when they send inappropriate or threatening content/ e-mails to their victims and get delighted. The main target of digital domineering jerks yet in addition customary harassers is to have power. They wish to have control of every circumstance. They want to be dominators and oppress everybody and end up with doing such cybercrimes.

Effects of Cyber Bullying

Cyberbullying is an ugly face of the internet and therefore its consequences are also ugly yet dangerous.

There are numerous serious consequences of cyberbullying victimization. Victims may have low self-esteem, fear of associating with others, growing suicidal rumination, a variety of emotional responses, and many more serious problems.

Cyberbullying disturbs the peace of mind of a person. In fact, several people are known to have suffered from depression after getting cyberbullied. Besides, many people attempt to do self-harming activities. In addition, all those inapt comments or content make them feel inferior.

Cyberbullying results in many serious insecurities and complexes which can be understood by the following impacts of cyberbullying: –

  • Mental and physical sickness
  • The victim feels alone and isolated
  • Losing interest in going to school/ college or office
  • Victims might get ill
  • Emotional damage
  • Having self-doubt
  • Losing self-confidence
  • Losing inner peace
  • Suppression of speech
  • Cyberbullying tarnishes the image of a person
  • Ruin reputation due to rumours

How to Halt Cyber Bullying?

Prevention of cyberbullying is the severest thing the world needs right now. Cyber-crimes and bullying are needed to be monitored properly and should be put to an end now.

Cyberbullying can be prevented in various ways of tackling and ceasing it. All those methods can be implemented by every individual or authoritative level people as well.

Here are some ways to prevent cyberbullying: –

  • Never share your personal information online
  • Neglect posting your explicit pictures or information on social media
  • Do not ever discuss personal matters on social media platforms
  • Keep your information and details limited
  • Maintain your information security by yourself
  • Do not share your account details or internet password with anyone
  • Do not click on the mysterious links
  • Make yourself, your children or fellows aware of cyberbullying
  • Monitor your children’s online activities and limit its usage
  • Use the new technologies carefully
  • Do not allow any site to take your personal information
  • Never let anyone take your photo or video without your consent
  • Never respond to any unknown message or mail
  • If any case of cyberbullying comes, do not delay to report it
  • Make use of cyber-security provisions to fight back
  • Try to identify the victims
  • School and colleges should organize some sessions to inform the students and make them aware with do’s and don’ts
  • The country should support the victim and make justice with him utilizing the laws against cybercrime and cyberbullying

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After going through this sample, you might have understood the concept of cyberbullying as well as your do’s and don’ts. You should always stay aware and also make others aware too. Apart from that, coming to your assignment you might have got a suitable idea from this cyber bullying essay sample to write one for yourself.

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Cyberbullying is a significant issue, and it can be really dreadful to experience such a troublesome period. Being brave and retaliating is the main choice against these domineering jerks. It’s conceivable to get over it and carry on with your life once more. Consulting a counsellor can enable the victims to deal with the event more reliably and securely. Life doesn’t get over if you are a sufferer of cyberbullying and it is possible to fight back and live your life happily further.

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Cyberbullying Essay Example, with Outline

Published by gudwriter on November 23, 2017 November 23, 2017

Cyberbullying entails the use of chat rooms, websites, instant messaging, and e-mail for deliberately intimidating and antagonizing others. It is variously referred to as online bullying or electronic bullying. To get more insight on cyber bullying, lecturers may give tests and essays on cyber bullying and this is where the services of competent online research writer at Gudwriter will come in. You will get help at an affordable price. Here is a cyber bullying essay sample.

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Cyberbullying Essay Example 1

Is cyberbullying worse than physical bullying essay outline.

Introduction

Thesis: Given its very nature, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying which is otherwise known as traditional bullying.

Paragraph 1:

While both physical bullying and cyberbullying may result in long lasting effects on the people involved, the two terms have some notable differences.

  • While the former occurs physically, the latter is only possible through electronic gadgets and through the use of the Internet.
  • In traditional bullying, the victim would easily know and access the one bullying them whereas in cyberbullying, it would be difficult to know or trace the bully.

Paragraph 2:

Cyberbullying is particularly worse and more hurtful than physical bullying because of the anonymity attached to it.

  • Since he or she is unknown to the victim, the person doing cyberbullying gets emboldened while the victim continues to suffer from an increased fear factor.
  • “Because it does not occur face-to-face, bullies are able to mete out pain without witnessing the consequences and victims often cannot stand up for themselves, even if they are so inclined.”

Paragraph 3:

Another factor that makes online bullying more hurtful, and is closely related to anonymity, is the ability of the bully to say things that they would not possibly say to their victim physically to their face.

  • When a bully thinks they can continue remaining unknown to the victim and other people, “they are less inhibited in saying things they never would say to a person face-to-face.”
  • A person would not have to be accountable for their actions if they can hide behind a screen through the help of technology.
  • Effectively, this causes the fear of being caught and punished to diminish because the person cannot be identified with an action they committed.

Paragraph 4:

Cyberbullying is also conducted on and through environments that are new and are not inhibited by many traditional limitations.

  • It is not limited by time or place and thus has no set medium, locations, or hours.
  • When one can send their victim hurtful messages throughout at their own pleasure, it feels like there is no rout for escaping or evading the constant attack by an unknown tormentor.

Paragraph 5:

Some people would argue that physical bullying is worse than cyberbullying as it may involve the victim suffering bodily harm from the bully.

  • While it is true that bodily harm are serious to the physical health of the victim, this argument fails to recognize the fact that cyberbullying can cause very serious mental harm to the victim.
  • Mental harm could cause the victim to suffer from self-inflicted bodily harm or even commit suicide.

While bullying in any form is hurtful and harmful, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying in this respect. Cyberbullying has made work easier for bullies because they no longer have to conduct bullying at given times and in given places. Coupled with the fact that it allows for anonymity on the part of the bully, cyberbullying causes more harm.

Is Cyberbullying worse than Physical Bullying?

It is common knowledge that bullying of any kind through whatever platform is harmful to the victim(s). The matter has however been worsened by technological advancements which have since escalated bullying to a whole new and more dangerous level. This new kind of bullying entails the use of bash or chat rooms, voting booths, websites, instant messaging, and e-mail for deliberately intimidating and antagonizing others. It is variously referred to as cyberbullying, online bullying, or electronic bullying. A measure of mean spiritedness seems to be encouraged by the Internet even though the same Internet allows for communication that is unbridled and undisturbed. Given its very nature, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying which is otherwise known as traditional bullying.

While both physical bullying and cyberbullying may result in long lasting effects on the people involved, the two terms have some notable differences. One of the major differences between “bullying” and “cyberbullying” is that while the former occurs physically, the latter is only possible through electronic gadgets and through the use of the Internet. This is the reason why it is sometimes called online bullying. Another difference is that in traditional bullying, the victim would easily know and access the one bullying them whereas in cyberbullying, it would be difficult to know or trace the bully. In cyberbullying, a bully can disguise their true identity by hiding behind a user name that is pseudonymous (Henkin, 2012). This makes them to be more aggressive in their bullying behavior and thus makes cyberbullying more dangerous as compared to physical bullying.

This anonymity attached to cyberbullying makes it worse and more hurtful than physical bullying. Since the bully is unknown to the victim, he or she gets emboldened while the victim continues to suffer from an increased fear factor. “Because it does not occur face-to-face, bullies are able to mete out pain without witnessing the consequences and victims often cannot stand up for themselves, even if they are so inclined” (Beale & Hall, 2007). This implies that no matter the amount of pain the victim suffers from cyberbullying, there is actually nothing they would do to avert or avoid it as long as the bully persists. Electronic bullying thus becomes so insidious and hurtful largely because of its secretive nature. A tormentor can access the victim at their own pleasure and hurl whatever insults or other hurtful acts or messages to them while remaining rest assured that they are unknown.

Another factor that makes online bullying more hurtful, and is closely related to anonymity, is the ability of the bully to say things that they would not possibly say to their victim physically to their face. According to Beale and Hall (2007), when a bully thinks they can continue remaining unknown to the victim and other people, “they are less inhibited in saying things they never would say to a person face-to-face.” As a matter of fact, even if the victim strives to identify the bully online, they (the bully) can claim that their screen name is being used by someone to cause the bullying. A person would not have to be accountable for their actions if they can hide behind a screen through the help of technology. Effectively, this causes the fear of being caught and punished to diminish because the person cannot be identified with an action they committed. “This phenomenon is referred to as disinhibition and requires that administrators create a comprehensive sunlight plan for bringing cyberbullying out of the shadows…” (Beale & Hall, 2007).

Cyberbullying is also conducted on and through environments that are new and are not inhibited by many traditional limitations. Cyberbullying can be conducted from anywhere and at any time unlike traditional or physical bullying that is only possible through face-to-face interaction and outside the home. It is not limited by time or place and thus has no set medium, locations, or hours. When one can send their victim hurtful messages throughout at their own pleasure, it feels like there is no rout for escaping or evading the constant attack by an unknown tormentor. While traditional bullying never goes beyond the public space into the home, cyberbullying follows one right into their home and into whatever room they might “hide” (Parker, 2014). With the home no longer serving as a safe zone free from bullying, cyberbullying victims continue to get harassed and thus grow increasingly helpless.

Some people would argue that physical bullying is worse than cyberbullying as it may involve the victim suffering bodily harm from the bully. Such arguments hold that bodily harm is more serious than just insults that cause no bodily injuries to the victim (Hunter, 2012). While it is true that bodily harm are serious to the physical health of the victim, this argument fails to recognize the fact that cyberbullying can cause very serious mental harm to the victim. While bodily harm may be treated and see the victim recover fully, mental harm could be as dangerous and as long lasting as to cause the victim to suffer from self-inflicted bodily harm or even commit suicide. Moreover, in physical bullying, the victim has the chance of running away or avoiding bodily harm. In cyberbullying on the other hand, the victim has no leeway of evading the constant attacks.

While bullying in any form is hurtful and harmful, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying in this respect. In physical bullying, both the victim and the tormentor have to be physically present at the same place and at the same time. Cyberbullying has since made work easier for bullies because they no longer have to conduct bullying at given times and in given places. They can now do it at the comfort of their homes and at whatever time and still reach their target victims with their messages of harassment. The victim can no longer use their home as a safe haven where they can avoid being bullied. Coupled with the fact that it allows for anonymity on the part of the bully, cyberbullying causes more harm and is definitely worse than physical bulling.  

Beale, A., & Hall, K. (2007). Cyberbullying: what school administrators (and parents) can do. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas , 81 (1), 8-12.

Henkin, R. (2012). Speaking my mind: confronting bullying: it really can get better.   The English Journal,   101 (6), 110-113.

Hunter, N. (2012). Cyber bullying . Chicago, IL: Raintree.

Parker, R. J. (2014). Beyond sticks and stones: cyberbullying . North Charleston: Createspace Independent Pub.

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Cyberbullying Essay Example 2

Cyberbullying essay outline.

Thesis:  Acts of cyberbullying have put people through immense suffering that can and should be prevented.

“Victims of cyberbullying can have lasting emotional, concentration and behavioral issues.”

  • These problems may negatively affect their social lives.
  • They may find it challenging to get along with others.
  • They find it difficult to trust other people
  • They are likely to start engaging in alcohol and drug abuse at an early age.

Cyberbullying victims feel powerless and vulnerable as they often find it difficult to feel safe.

  • It is possible for a bully to invade their home at any time of the day.
  • They no longer have a place to ‘hide’.
  • The bullies can choose to remain anonymous as long as they taunt their victims.

Online bullying makes victims feel dissatisfied with who they are as it often attacks them where they are most vulnerable.

  • They begin to develop a feeling of doubt about their self worth and value.
  • They may respond by causing harm to themselves in some way.  

Cyberbullying may be prevented through the monitoring of children’s or teenager’s online activity by their parents or guardians.

  • Parents should know what sites their children visit when online and the people they interact with.
  • They should develop trustworthiness with a child so that they would be ready to willingly reveal their online activity.
  • They may also make use of an iPhone monitoring app such as Pumpic.

Cyberbullying may also be prevented through engagement of parents and youth by schools.

  • A school may create a community where a unified message against cyberbullying would be sent by adults and learners.
  • It may establish a school safety committee and entrust it with discussing and controlling the problems of online bullying.
  • Schools may create cyberbullying rules and policies.

Paragraph 6: 

Cyberbullying is so dangerous that it should be criminalized.

  • It pushes its victims to attempt or actually commit suicide.
  • In 2013, a teenage girl took her own life in the U.S. as a result of being bullied online.

Cyberbullying has far reaching effects on its victims and it should thus be prevented or seriously controlled. It subjects people to emotional torture so much that they begin to doubt their worth and value as human beings. Prevention of this detrimental phenomenon majorly lies with parents and schools.

Cyberbullying Essay Sample

Cyberbullying refers to electronic aggression whereby such technology as social media, the Internet, gaming environments, and smartphones are deliberately used to threaten, badmouth, humiliate, or harass people. Just like any other form of bullying, cyber-bullying can negatively affect someone’s well-being, reputation, and joy in life. Compared to the “traditional” face-to-face bullying, this form of bullying is more ferocious as it allows bullies to hide behind digital gadgets and taunt their victims as much as they want. It thus magnifies the problem of bullying. Acts of cyber bullying have put people through immense suffering that can and should be prevented.

Victims of cyberbullying can have lasting emotional, concentration, and behavioral issues. These problems may negatively affect their social lives as they may find it challenging to get along with others. They find it difficult to trust other people and are more likely to start engaging in alcohol and drug abuse at an early age. In addition, cyberbullying can make its victims to develop dangerous stigmas and at the same time suffer harmful shame from other people, especially their peers. They can suffer physiological symptoms despite not being threatened physically. They frequently complain of stomach pain and headaches that are usually a result of nervousness (Duverge, 2015). They may also harm themselves by for instance damaging or cutting their skin with razor blades.

Cyberbullying  victims also feel powerless and vulnerable as they often find it difficult to feel safe. This typically emanates from the possibility of a bully invading their home at any time of the day, nighttime included, through a cell phone or computer. Unlike initially when they could count themselves safe once they were at home, they no longer have a place to ‘hide’. Additionally, the feelings of fear can escalate due to the fact that the bullies can choose to remain anonymous as long as they taunt their victims. While some cyberbullies choose people they know, these people have no idea who is subjecting them to this immense pain and depression (Schwartz, 2013). The victims thus cannot help but remain wishful that their tormentors could soon stop.

Further, online bullying makes victims feel dissatisfied with who they are as it often attacks them where they are most vulnerable. Consequently, targets of this vice often begin to develop a feeling of doubt about their self-worth and value and may respond by causing harm to themselves in some way (Völlink, Dehue, & Guckin, 2015). For example, if a bully calls a girl fat, the girl may begin to take a crash diet while believing that the bullying will stop if she changes how she looks. There are also other times when victims may try to avoid additional bullying by changing something about their attitude or appearance. Often, the net effect of such self-induced changes is that they are more harmful than beneficial.

Cyberbullying may be prevented through monitoring of children’s or teenager’s online activity by their parents or guardians. Parents should know what sites their children visit when online and the people they interact with over the Internet (Lindeen, 2017). One way to do this would be to develop trustworthiness with a child so that they would be ready to willingly reveal their online activity. Alternatively, a parent can install an iPhone monitoring app such as Pumpic. This way, they would be able to monitor the general online behavior of the child including their social media activity such as Facebook and Instagram as well as their call logs and text messages, including deleted ones. One can also remotely control or block their child’s phone using a personal cell phone or a PC.

Another way of preventing cyberbullying would be through engagement of parents and youth by schools. A school may do this by creating a community where a unified message against cyberbullying would be sent by adults and learners. A school may also establish a school safety committee and entrust it with discussing and controlling the problems of online bullying. Additionally, schools may create rules and policies that govern the vice, including reporting systems for cyberbullying. While taking all these steps, it is important that the school informs parents, children, and the entire school community about their main objectives (Lindeen, 2017). This would improve the effectiveness of the initiatives in alleviating the online bullying problem as perpetuated by the children.

Cyberbullying is so dangerous that it should be criminalized. One of the reasons why this detrimental practice should be a criminal offense is that it pushes its victims to attempt or actually commit suicide. A case that caught the attention of the entire nation in the United States occurred in 2013 when a teenage girl took her own life as a result of being bullied online. The girl in question was known as Hannah Smith and was by the time of her death 14 years old. Some users of ask.fm, a social media site that she frequented, reportedly tormented her to an extent that she could no longer take it (BBC News, 2013). As one may imagine, the young girl must have felt both worthless and helpless and saw death as the ultimate solution. To prevent such unfortunate occurrences in the future, there needs to be a clear law detailing how cyberbullying should be legally dealt with. The absence of such legislation might only imply more suicide cases related to the practice in the country.

Cyberbullying has far reaching effects on its victims and it should thus be prevented or seriously controlled. It subjects people to emotional torture so much that they begin to doubt their worth and value as human beings. One may find it difficult to socialize with others and may resort to being alone or even harm themselves physically with an object. They may further adopt a harmful lifestyle just to change who they are in terms of their appearance. Prevention of this detrimental phenomenon majorly lies with parents and schools. Parents should strive to ensure that their children do not use the Internet to offend others. Similarly, schools should device effective methods and initiatives for preventing children from engaging in online bullying. The government should also come in and criminalize the practice.

BBC News, 2013. “Cyberbullying law needed, says children’s commissioner for Wales”.  BBC . Retrieved July 3, 2020 from  https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-24525491 .

Duverge, G. (2015). Digital threats: The impact of cyberbullying.  Touro University Worldwide . Retrieved May 22, 2018 from  http://www.tuw.edu/content/health/impact-of-cyberbullying/

Lindeen, M. (2017).  Digital safety smarts: Preventing cyberbullying . Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications.

Schwartz, H. E. (2013).  Cyberbullying . Mankato, MN: Capstone Press.

Völlink, T., Dehue, F., & Guckin, C. (2015).  Cyberbullying: From theory to intervention . New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

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    978 Words4 Pages Omar: Cell phones can also be used for cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is actually a really big issue for kids and teens today. It is easier to get cyber bullied today and to cyber bully than it was about 10 years ago thanks to cell phones.

  13. Cyberbullying and its impact on young people's emotional health and

    The nature of cyberbullying. Traditional face-to-face bullying has long been identified as a risk factor for the social and emotional adjustment of perpetrators, targets and bully victims during childhood and adolescence; Reference Almeida, Caurcel and Machado 1-Reference Sourander, Brunstein, Ikomen, Lindroos, Luntamo and Koskelainen 6 bystanders are also known to be negatively affected.

  14. PDF Cyberbullying Essay Outline Paragraph 1: Introduction and Thesis

    Cyberbullying Essay Outline Paragraph 1: Introduction and Thesis - The increased use of Facebook and other social media sites has led to more cyberbullying. A. What is social media? B. Benefits of social media C. Negative things about social media such as cyberbullying and privacy issues Paragraph 2: Cyberbullying A. What is it?

  15. (PDF) Cyber Bullying

    Compared to direct or relational victims, cyber-victimization had similar negative effects on behavior (z = −0.41) and self-esteem (z = −0.22) compared to those not involved in bullying.

  16. Essay on Cyber Bullying

    Introduction Cyberbullying, a modern form of harassment, has emerged with the advent of innovative communication technologies. This digital form of bullying is characterized by the intent to cause emotional distress and the repeated use of communication tools to harm others. The Prevalence of Cyberbullying

  17. Chapter 1: Introduction

    For instance, cases of cyber stalking or bullying of children rose from 40 in 2018 to 140 in 2020, as reported by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) of India. [28] , [29] These criminal cases essentially represent the tip of the iceberg and reports indicate an increasing trend of such episodes.

  18. Essays on Cyber Bullying

    Cyber bullying can be very harmful to a person's mental health and state, self-esteem, anxiety, or even depression. In some ways, it is more dangerous than physical bullying and cyber bullies, unlike physical bullies, can act incognito and globally through the internet. According to statistics, over 35% of the population was at some point in ...

  19. Introduction Of Cyber Bullying

    Introduction Of Cyber Bullying. Bullying is a cruel and intentional behavior whose aim is to show the imbalance in power between the bully and the victim. Bullying is a repeated action and can involve verbal, physical and relational behavior (Nansel, Tonja et al. 2094). There are different ways of bullying, a boy is more physical when they ...

  20. Cyber Bullying Essay Example

    The aspiring and devoted Singaporean students who are pursuing IT courses, Computer Science course programs come across the topic of cyberbullying and also along with the in-depth knowledge of every topic, they get assignments too for writing a cyber bullying essay. Introduction to Cyber Bullying. Cyberbullying also called as cyber harassment is a form of threatening, bullying, harassing or ...

  21. Cyber Bullying Essay Introduction

    Cyber Bullying Essay Introduction Improved Essays 704 Words 3 Pages Open Document Essay Sample Check Writing Quality Check Writing Quality We all know that person who made someone's life unhappy every day at school, which make him lived in fear.

  22. Cyberbullying Essay Example, with Outline

    Introduction Thesis: Given its very nature, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying which is otherwise known as traditional bullying. Body Paragraph 1: While both physical bullying and cyberbullying may result in long lasting effects on the people involved, the two terms have some notable differences.

  23. Cyber Bullying Argumentative Essay Example

    Cyber bullying can be defined as the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by an individual or group that is intended to harm others. Cyber bullying is mostly conducted by kids that have very early authority to these technologies.