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by Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.  

A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

October 14, 2014 in  Pedagogy

Middle School Writing Samples

When I started my first job as a professional newspaper reporter (This job also served as an internship during my junior year in college — I just didn’t leave for about 6 years.), I quickly realized that all my experience, and all my years of journalism education had not been enough to help me write stories about drug busts, fatal car accidents and tornadoes. All the theoretical work I’d done, and all of the nifty little scholastic and collegiate stories I had done, did not prepare me for real world writing.

At that point, I had to find a solution quickly. After all, I had a deadline to meet, and it was only a few hours away.

One of my colleagues, who also served as a mentor, had the solution. She introduced me to the newspaper’s “morgue.” This was a room filled with filing cabinets in which we kept old — dead — stories arranged by reporter. Whenever I wasn’t’ sure how to write a story, all I had to do was check the morgue for similar stories. If I needed to write a story about a local drug bust, for example, I’d find another story on a similar incident, study its structure, and mentally create a formula in which to plugin the information I’d gathered.

Once I’d gained more experience, and had internalized the formula for that particular type of story, I felt free to branch out as the situation — and my training — warranted.

I do the same thing when I want to write a type of letter, brochure, or report that I’ve never written before.

This is what writing looks like in the real world.

Of course, if you’re a new teacher like me, there is one problem with providing mentor texts to my students: I have a dearth of middle school level writing sitting around in my file cabinets.

Fortunately, the Internet is full of sources, so I scoured the bowels of Google to find examples. I know how busy you are, so I’m sharing.

Expository writing examples for middle school

Below are several sources of expository writing samples for middle school students.

  • The Write Source Expository Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Expository Essay Models

Finally, here is an article in the New York Times that will help you teach your students  real-world expository writing skills .

Descriptive writing examples for middle school

  • Descriptive Writing Samples from Novels
  • Milwaukee Public Schools Descriptive Essay Samples (p. 137)
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Descriptive Essay Models

Narrative writing examples for middle school

  • Writing Samples by Steve Peha (PDF)
  • The Write Source Narrative Writing Samples
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Ideas and Organization)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Sentence Fluency and Conventions)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Voice and Word Choice)
  • Oregon Department of Education High School Scored Narrative and Argumentative Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Narrative Essay Models

Argumentative/persuasive writing examples for middle school

  • The Write Source Persuasive Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Persuasive Essay Models

Reflective writing examples for middle school

  • Reflective essay examples from Lake Washington Girls Middle School

If you know of any other online writing example sources, please feel free to share them in the comments below.

Related topics: Argumentative Writing , Informative Writing , Mentor Texts , Narrative Writing

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About the author 

Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma student working on my doctorate in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum with an concentration in English Education and co-Editor of the Oklahoma English Journal. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify students' voices and choices.

This is very, very helpful. Thank you for sharing!

As a new middle school teacher (coming from elementary) this was very helpful and encouraging.

Thank you very much for letting me know. I’m glad that I was able to help you!

Thank you! I’m glad I can help.

Your welcome

This is super helpful. Thank you!

These links are a fantastic help. Thank you!

This helped me BUNCHES! Thanks so much!

thanks so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! XD

These links are now dead 🙁

Thank you for notifying me! I have updated the post to include new (live!) links. Some of them are geared towards high school, but I think we can still use them as exemplars of what we want our students to aim for.

Comments are closed.

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94 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School: Protocols, Health, Politics, And More

January 4, 2024 //  by  Brittany Ray

Middle schoolers are always ready for a feisty debate and to argue their points! This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of fun choices to explore! Take a look and see which topics are sure to spark some interest in your classroom!

School Rules and Policies

1. should cell phones be allowed at school.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

2. Should gym class (physical education) be a requirement?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

3. Explain why or why not: Should students have homework on weekends?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

4. Should the school day be extended in exchange for a long weekend?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

5. Do you feel the government should dictate what you get for school lunch?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

6. Do you believe brick-and-mortar schools are still necessary for today’s post-pandemic society?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

7. Is the student-per-class limit too high?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

8. Should high school students be required to take a civics exam before graduation?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

9. Should school security be improved?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

10. Should students be allowed to use smartwatches during examinations?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

11. Should there be a limit to the amount of homework a school can assign to students?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

12. Is the traditional grading system effective, or does it need an overhaul?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

13. Should schools offer more extracurricular activities to cater to diverse interests?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

14. Do schools place too much emphasis on sports and athletes at the expense of academic pursuits?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

15. Explain your stance as to whether schools should or should not require students to wear uniforms.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

16. Do you believe that school field trips are beneficial or merely recreational?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

17. Should students be required to learn a second language starting in middle school?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

18. Should the government have the ability to ban certain books in the classroom?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

19. Should school cafeterias serve exclusively vegetarian meals to promote health?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

20. Should schools have mandatory classes on financial literacy?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

21. Should schools have strict policies against cyberbullying?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

22. Should schools have mandatory mental health classes and counseling sessions?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

23. Should students be allowed to grade their teachers?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

24. Should schools have mindfulness and meditation sessions as part of the daily routine?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

25. Should schools emphasize more on teaching critical thinking skills rather than just memorizing things?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

26. Should there be more emphasis on vocational training in middle school?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

27. Should students be taught the dangers of misinformation and “fake news” as part of their curriculum?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

28. Should schools introduce mandatory community service as part of the curriculum?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

29. Should schools allow students to bring their pets to school?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

30. Should schools be allowed to monitor students’ online activities?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

31. Should education about global warming and environmental conservation be a mandatory part of the curriculum?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

32. Should schools introduce more practical skills courses like basic cooking, sewing, or home repair?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

33. Do school dress codes infringe on personal expression?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

34. Should middle school students be allowed to bring and use laptops in class?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

35. Is homeschooling a better option than traditional schooling for some students?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

36. Is learning to write in cursive still a necessary skill in the digital age?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

37. Should school libraries invest in more digital resources or in physical books?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

38. Should students be taught about controversial historical figures objectively or with a critical lens?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

39. Should students have a more significant say in the creation of school rules and policies?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

40. Do schools focus too much on college preparation at the expense of life skills?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

41. Should parents be held more accountable for their children’s misbehavior at school?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

42. Are parent-teacher conferences still effective or have they become outdated?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

43. Should middle schools have later start times to accommodate adolescent sleep patterns?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

College Admission and Tuition 

44. should excellent grades guarantee a scholarship.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

45. Should a college degree earned through online education have the same worth as a degree earned at a brick-and-mortar university?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

46. Do you feel art courses should be a required part of earning a college degree?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

47. Should college admission criteria be less stringent?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

48. Should college athletes be paid?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

49. Do you believe that a college education is necessary for everyone?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

50. Should public education at the college level be tuition-free?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Health and Wellbeing

51. do parents put too much pressure on their children to excel academically.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

52. Should cigarettes be illegal?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

53. Should employers have the right to require a Covid-19 vaccine?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

54. Is milk beneficial to a person’s health?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

55. Are hot dogs bad for you?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

56. Do you agree or disagree that parents should be held responsible for childhood obesity?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

57. Should the FDA allow GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) in our food?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

58. Does the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) do a good job of regulating the production of food?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

59. Should junk food advertisements be banned during children’s TV shows?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

60. Should students be allowed to take “mental health days” off from school?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Government, Politics, and Civic Responsibilities

61. do you think electronic voting machines make the election procedure fair or unfair.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

62. Explain whether or not the Electoral College should be eliminated.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

63. Should the government have more say in what is or is not “fake news”?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

64. Should a felon have the right to vote?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

65. Should all political offices have term limits?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

66. Should the voting age be lowered?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

67. The moral stain of the slavery of African American people in early American History is undoubtedly present. Do you feel the government promotes hate or love with the way it currently speaks about racism?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

68. Should the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

69. Should the government have more strict gun control policies?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

70. With the separation of church and state, should churches be exempt from paying taxes?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

71. Do you feel undocumented immigrants should be granted all the same rights as naturalized citizens?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

72. Have Native American communities been given proper reparations for the United States’ long history of seizing land?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

73. Do you think that the government should do more to fight against human trafficking?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Environmental and Moral Issues

74. is climate change something we can truly make a difference with.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

75. If protecting the environment is of utmost importance, should bottled water be banned?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

76. Should exotic animals be kept in captivity?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

77. Explain your stance on whether wind farms are a good or bad idea.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

78. Do “participation trophies” diminish the value of real achievement?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

79. Should there be harsher punishments for bullying?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

80. Explain whether or not animal testing should be outlawed.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

81. Should the death penalty exist?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

82. Should an individual be able to keep wild animals as pets if they have the means to care for them?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

83. Do curfews for teenagers prevent them from getting in trouble or infringe on personal freedom?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

84. Is scientific research on cloning DNA ethical?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

85. Is daylight saving something the U.S. should keep, or should it be abolished?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

86. Should schools ban single-use plastics?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Digital and Media

87. do children currently have too much screen time, and is it harmful.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

88. Do you believe that the media and/or social media negatively impact body image among teens?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

89. Do social media platforms need stricter age verification processes?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

90. Should parents have access to their children’s social media accounts for monitoring purposes?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

91. Should parents limit the time their children spend on video games?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

92. Should violent video games be banned in the United States?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

93. Do violent cartoons and animations impact a child’s behavior negatively?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

94. Do video games have educational potential or are they merely distractions?

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

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Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, how to write an a+ argumentative essay.

Miscellaneous

feature_typewriter

You'll no doubt have to write a number of argumentative essays in both high school and college, but what, exactly, is an argumentative essay and how do you write the best one possible? Let's take a look.

A great argumentative essay always combines the same basic elements: approaching an argument from a rational perspective, researching sources, supporting your claims using facts rather than opinion, and articulating your reasoning into the most cogent and reasoned points. Argumentative essays are great building blocks for all sorts of research and rhetoric, so your teachers will expect you to master the technique before long.

But if this sounds daunting, never fear! We'll show how an argumentative essay differs from other kinds of papers, how to research and write them, how to pick an argumentative essay topic, and where to find example essays. So let's get started.

What Is an Argumentative Essay? How Is it Different from Other Kinds of Essays?

There are two basic requirements for any and all essays: to state a claim (a thesis statement) and to support that claim with evidence.

Though every essay is founded on these two ideas, there are several different types of essays, differentiated by the style of the writing, how the writer presents the thesis, and the types of evidence used to support the thesis statement.

Essays can be roughly divided into four different types:

#1: Argumentative #2: Persuasive #3: Expository #4: Analytical

So let's look at each type and what the differences are between them before we focus the rest of our time to argumentative essays.

Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays are what this article is all about, so let's talk about them first.

An argumentative essay attempts to convince a reader to agree with a particular argument (the writer's thesis statement). The writer takes a firm stand one way or another on a topic and then uses hard evidence to support that stance.

An argumentative essay seeks to prove to the reader that one argument —the writer's argument— is the factually and logically correct one. This means that an argumentative essay must use only evidence-based support to back up a claim , rather than emotional or philosophical reasoning (which is often allowed in other types of essays). Thus, an argumentative essay has a burden of substantiated proof and sources , whereas some other types of essays (namely persuasive essays) do not.

You can write an argumentative essay on any topic, so long as there's room for argument. Generally, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one, so long as you support the argumentative essay with hard evidence.

Example topics of an argumentative essay:

  • "Should farmers be allowed to shoot wolves if those wolves injure or kill farm animals?"
  • "Should the drinking age be lowered in the United States?"
  • "Are alternatives to democracy effective and/or feasible to implement?"

The next three types of essays are not argumentative essays, but you may have written them in school. We're going to cover them so you know what not to do for your argumentative essay.

Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative essays, so it can be easy to get them confused. But knowing what makes an argumentative essay different than a persuasive essay can often mean the difference between an excellent grade and an average one.

Persuasive essays seek to persuade a reader to agree with the point of view of the writer, whether that point of view is based on factual evidence or not. The writer has much more flexibility in the evidence they can use, with the ability to use moral, cultural, or opinion-based reasoning as well as factual reasoning to persuade the reader to agree the writer's side of a given issue.

Instead of being forced to use "pure" reason as one would in an argumentative essay, the writer of a persuasive essay can manipulate or appeal to the reader's emotions. So long as the writer attempts to steer the readers into agreeing with the thesis statement, the writer doesn't necessarily need hard evidence in favor of the argument.

Often, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one—the difference is all in the approach and the evidence you present.

Example topics of a persuasive essay:

  • "Should children be responsible for their parents' debts?"
  • "Should cheating on a test be automatic grounds for expulsion?"
  • "How much should sports leagues be held accountable for player injuries and the long-term consequences of those injuries?"

Expository Essay

An expository essay is typically a short essay in which the writer explains an idea, issue, or theme , or discusses the history of a person, place, or idea.

This is typically a fact-forward essay with little argument or opinion one way or the other.

Example topics of an expository essay:

  • "The History of the Philadelphia Liberty Bell"
  • "The Reasons I Always Wanted to be a Doctor"
  • "The Meaning Behind the Colloquialism ‘People in Glass Houses Shouldn't Throw Stones'"

Analytical Essay

An analytical essay seeks to delve into the deeper meaning of a text or work of art, or unpack a complicated idea . These kinds of essays closely interpret a source and look into its meaning by analyzing it at both a macro and micro level.

This type of analysis can be augmented by historical context or other expert or widely-regarded opinions on the subject, but is mainly supported directly through the original source (the piece or art or text being analyzed) .

Example topics of an analytical essay:

  • "Victory Gin in Place of Water: The Symbolism Behind Gin as the Only Potable Substance in George Orwell's 1984"
  • "Amarna Period Art: The Meaning Behind the Shift from Rigid to Fluid Poses"
  • "Adultery During WWII, as Told Through a Series of Letters to and from Soldiers"

body_juggle

There are many different types of essay and, over time, you'll be able to master them all.

A Typical Argumentative Essay Assignment

The average argumentative essay is between three to five pages, and will require at least three or four separate sources with which to back your claims . As for the essay topic , you'll most often be asked to write an argumentative essay in an English class on a "general" topic of your choice, ranging the gamut from science, to history, to literature.

But while the topics of an argumentative essay can span several different fields, the structure of an argumentative essay is always the same: you must support a claim—a claim that can reasonably have multiple sides—using multiple sources and using a standard essay format (which we'll talk about later on).

This is why many argumentative essay topics begin with the word "should," as in:

  • "Should all students be required to learn chemistry in high school?"
  • "Should children be required to learn a second language?"
  • "Should schools or governments be allowed to ban books?"

These topics all have at least two sides of the argument: Yes or no. And you must support the side you choose with evidence as to why your side is the correct one.

But there are also plenty of other ways to frame an argumentative essay as well:

  • "Does using social media do more to benefit or harm people?"
  • "Does the legal status of artwork or its creators—graffiti and vandalism, pirated media, a creator who's in jail—have an impact on the art itself?"
  • "Is or should anyone ever be ‘above the law?'"

Though these are worded differently than the first three, you're still essentially forced to pick between two sides of an issue: yes or no, for or against, benefit or detriment. Though your argument might not fall entirely into one side of the divide or another—for instance, you could claim that social media has positively impacted some aspects of modern life while being a detriment to others—your essay should still support one side of the argument above all. Your final stance would be that overall , social media is beneficial or overall , social media is harmful.

If your argument is one that is mostly text-based or backed by a single source (e.g., "How does Salinger show that Holden Caulfield is an unreliable narrator?" or "Does Gatsby personify the American Dream?"), then it's an analytical essay, rather than an argumentative essay. An argumentative essay will always be focused on more general topics so that you can use multiple sources to back up your claims.

Good Argumentative Essay Topics

So you know the basic idea behind an argumentative essay, but what topic should you write about?

Again, almost always, you'll be asked to write an argumentative essay on a free topic of your choice, or you'll be asked to select between a few given topics . If you're given complete free reign of topics, then it'll be up to you to find an essay topic that no only appeals to you, but that you can turn into an A+ argumentative essay.

What makes a "good" argumentative essay topic depends on both the subject matter and your personal interest —it can be hard to give your best effort on something that bores you to tears! But it can also be near impossible to write an argumentative essay on a topic that has no room for debate.

As we said earlier, a good argumentative essay topic will be one that has the potential to reasonably go in at least two directions—for or against, yes or no, and why . For example, it's pretty hard to write an argumentative essay on whether or not people should be allowed to murder one another—not a whole lot of debate there for most people!—but writing an essay for or against the death penalty has a lot more wiggle room for evidence and argument.

A good topic is also one that can be substantiated through hard evidence and relevant sources . So be sure to pick a topic that other people have studied (or at least studied elements of) so that you can use their data in your argument. For example, if you're arguing that it should be mandatory for all middle school children to play a sport, you might have to apply smaller scientific data points to the larger picture you're trying to justify. There are probably several studies you could cite on the benefits of physical activity and the positive effect structure and teamwork has on young minds, but there's probably no study you could use where a group of scientists put all middle-schoolers in one jurisdiction into a mandatory sports program (since that's probably never happened). So long as your evidence is relevant to your point and you can extrapolate from it to form a larger whole, you can use it as a part of your resource material.

And if you need ideas on where to get started, or just want to see sample argumentative essay topics, then check out these links for hundreds of potential argumentative essay topics.

101 Persuasive (or Argumentative) Essay and Speech Topics

301 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

Top 50 Ideas for Argumentative/Persuasive Essay Writing

[Note: some of these say "persuasive essay topics," but just remember that the same topic can often be used for both a persuasive essay and an argumentative essay; the difference is in your writing style and the evidence you use to support your claims.]

body_fight

KO! Find that one argumentative essay topic you can absolutely conquer.

Argumentative Essay Format

Argumentative Essays are composed of four main elements:

  • A position (your argument)
  • Your reasons
  • Supporting evidence for those reasons (from reliable sources)
  • Counterargument(s) (possible opposing arguments and reasons why those arguments are incorrect)

If you're familiar with essay writing in general, then you're also probably familiar with the five paragraph essay structure . This structure is a simple tool to show how one outlines an essay and breaks it down into its component parts, although it can be expanded into as many paragraphs as you want beyond the core five.

The standard argumentative essay is often 3-5 pages, which will usually mean a lot more than five paragraphs, but your overall structure will look the same as a much shorter essay.

An argumentative essay at its simplest structure will look like:

Paragraph 1: Intro

  • Set up the story/problem/issue
  • Thesis/claim

Paragraph 2: Support

  • Reason #1 claim is correct
  • Supporting evidence with sources

Paragraph 3: Support

  • Reason #2 claim is correct

Paragraph 4: Counterargument

  • Explanation of argument for the other side
  • Refutation of opposing argument with supporting evidence

Paragraph 5: Conclusion

  • Re-state claim
  • Sum up reasons and support of claim from the essay to prove claim is correct

Now let's unpack each of these paragraph types to see how they work (with examples!), what goes into them, and why.

Paragraph 1—Set Up and Claim

Your first task is to introduce the reader to the topic at hand so they'll be prepared for your claim. Give a little background information, set the scene, and give the reader some stakes so that they care about the issue you're going to discuss.

Next, you absolutely must have a position on an argument and make that position clear to the readers. It's not an argumentative essay unless you're arguing for a specific claim, and this claim will be your thesis statement.

Your thesis CANNOT be a mere statement of fact (e.g., "Washington DC is the capital of the United States"). Your thesis must instead be an opinion which can be backed up with evidence and has the potential to be argued against (e.g., "New York should be the capital of the United States").

Paragraphs 2 and 3—Your Evidence

These are your body paragraphs in which you give the reasons why your argument is the best one and back up this reasoning with concrete evidence .

The argument supporting the thesis of an argumentative essay should be one that can be supported by facts and evidence, rather than personal opinion or cultural or religious mores.

For example, if you're arguing that New York should be the new capital of the US, you would have to back up that fact by discussing the factual contrasts between New York and DC in terms of location, population, revenue, and laws. You would then have to talk about the precedents for what makes for a good capital city and why New York fits the bill more than DC does.

Your argument can't simply be that a lot of people think New York is the best city ever and that you agree.

In addition to using concrete evidence, you always want to keep the tone of your essay passionate, but impersonal . Even though you're writing your argument from a single opinion, don't use first person language—"I think," "I feel," "I believe,"—to present your claims. Doing so is repetitive, since by writing the essay you're already telling the audience what you feel, and using first person language weakens your writing voice.

For example,

"I think that Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

"Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

The second statement sounds far stronger and more analytical.

Paragraph 4—Argument for the Other Side and Refutation

Even without a counter argument, you can make a pretty persuasive claim, but a counterargument will round out your essay into one that is much more persuasive and substantial.

By anticipating an argument against your claim and taking the initiative to counter it, you're allowing yourself to get ahead of the game. This way, you show that you've given great thought to all sides of the issue before choosing your position, and you demonstrate in multiple ways how yours is the more reasoned and supported side.

Paragraph 5—Conclusion

This paragraph is where you re-state your argument and summarize why it's the best claim.

Briefly touch on your supporting evidence and voila! A finished argumentative essay.

body_plesiosaur

Your essay should have just as awesome a skeleton as this plesiosaur does. (In other words: a ridiculously awesome skeleton)

Argumentative Essay Example: 5-Paragraph Style

It always helps to have an example to learn from. I've written a full 5-paragraph argumentative essay here. Look at how I state my thesis in paragraph 1, give supporting evidence in paragraphs 2 and 3, address a counterargument in paragraph 4, and conclude in paragraph 5.

Topic: Is it possible to maintain conflicting loyalties?

Paragraph 1

It is almost impossible to go through life without encountering a situation where your loyalties to different people or causes come into conflict with each other. Maybe you have a loving relationship with your sister, but she disagrees with your decision to join the army, or you find yourself torn between your cultural beliefs and your scientific ones. These conflicting loyalties can often be maintained for a time, but as examples from both history and psychological theory illustrate, sooner or later, people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever.

The first two sentences set the scene and give some hypothetical examples and stakes for the reader to care about.

The third sentence finishes off the intro with the thesis statement, making very clear how the author stands on the issue ("people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever." )

Paragraphs 2 and 3

Psychological theory states that human beings are not equipped to maintain conflicting loyalties indefinitely and that attempting to do so leads to a state called "cognitive dissonance." Cognitive dissonance theory is the psychological idea that people undergo tremendous mental stress or anxiety when holding contradictory beliefs, values, or loyalties (Festinger, 1957). Even if human beings initially hold a conflicting loyalty, they will do their best to find a mental equilibrium by making a choice between those loyalties—stay stalwart to a belief system or change their beliefs. One of the earliest formal examples of cognitive dissonance theory comes from Leon Festinger's When Prophesy Fails . Members of an apocalyptic cult are told that the end of the world will occur on a specific date and that they alone will be spared the Earth's destruction. When that day comes and goes with no apocalypse, the cult members face a cognitive dissonance between what they see and what they've been led to believe (Festinger, 1956). Some choose to believe that the cult's beliefs are still correct, but that the Earth was simply spared from destruction by mercy, while others choose to believe that they were lied to and that the cult was fraudulent all along. Both beliefs cannot be correct at the same time, and so the cult members are forced to make their choice.

But even when conflicting loyalties can lead to potentially physical, rather than just mental, consequences, people will always make a choice to fall on one side or other of a dividing line. Take, for instance, Nicolaus Copernicus, a man born and raised in Catholic Poland (and educated in Catholic Italy). Though the Catholic church dictated specific scientific teachings, Copernicus' loyalty to his own observations and scientific evidence won out over his loyalty to his country's government and belief system. When he published his heliocentric model of the solar system--in opposition to the geocentric model that had been widely accepted for hundreds of years (Hannam, 2011)-- Copernicus was making a choice between his loyalties. In an attempt t o maintain his fealty both to the established system and to what he believed, h e sat on his findings for a number of years (Fantoli, 1994). But, ultimately, Copernicus made the choice to side with his beliefs and observations above all and published his work for the world to see (even though, in doing so, he risked both his reputation and personal freedoms).

These two paragraphs provide the reasons why the author supports the main argument and uses substantiated sources to back those reasons.

The paragraph on cognitive dissonance theory gives both broad supporting evidence and more narrow, detailed supporting evidence to show why the thesis statement is correct not just anecdotally but also scientifically and psychologically. First, we see why people in general have a difficult time accepting conflicting loyalties and desires and then how this applies to individuals through the example of the cult members from the Dr. Festinger's research.

The next paragraph continues to use more detailed examples from history to provide further evidence of why the thesis that people cannot indefinitely maintain conflicting loyalties is true.

Paragraph 4

Some will claim that it is possible to maintain conflicting beliefs or loyalties permanently, but this is often more a matter of people deluding themselves and still making a choice for one side or the other, rather than truly maintaining loyalty to both sides equally. For example, Lancelot du Lac typifies a person who claims to maintain a balanced loyalty between to two parties, but his attempt to do so fails (as all attempts to permanently maintain conflicting loyalties must). Lancelot tells himself and others that he is equally devoted to both King Arthur and his court and to being Queen Guinevere's knight (Malory, 2008). But he can neither be in two places at once to protect both the king and queen, nor can he help but let his romantic feelings for the queen to interfere with his duties to the king and the kingdom. Ultimately, he and Queen Guinevere give into their feelings for one another and Lancelot—though he denies it—chooses his loyalty to her over his loyalty to Arthur. This decision plunges the kingdom into a civil war, ages Lancelot prematurely, and ultimately leads to Camelot's ruin (Raabe, 1987). Though Lancelot claimed to have been loyal to both the king and the queen, this loyalty was ultimately in conflict, and he could not maintain it.

Here we have the acknowledgement of a potential counter-argument and the evidence as to why it isn't true.

The argument is that some people (or literary characters) have asserted that they give equal weight to their conflicting loyalties. The refutation is that, though some may claim to be able to maintain conflicting loyalties, they're either lying to others or deceiving themselves. The paragraph shows why this is true by providing an example of this in action.

Paragraph 5

Whether it be through literature or history, time and time again, people demonstrate the challenges of trying to manage conflicting loyalties and the inevitable consequences of doing so. Though belief systems are malleable and will often change over time, it is not possible to maintain two mutually exclusive loyalties or beliefs at once. In the end, people always make a choice, and loyalty for one party or one side of an issue will always trump loyalty to the other.

The concluding paragraph summarizes the essay, touches on the evidence presented, and re-states the thesis statement.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay: 8 Steps

Writing the best argumentative essay is all about the preparation, so let's talk steps:

#1: Preliminary Research

If you have the option to pick your own argumentative essay topic (which you most likely will), then choose one or two topics you find the most intriguing or that you have a vested interest in and do some preliminary research on both sides of the debate.

Do an open internet search just to see what the general chatter is on the topic and what the research trends are.

Did your preliminary reading influence you to pick a side or change your side? Without diving into all the scholarly articles at length, do you believe there's enough evidence to support your claim? Have there been scientific studies? Experiments? Does a noted scholar in the field agree with you? If not, you may need to pick another topic or side of the argument to support.

#2: Pick Your Side and Form Your Thesis

Now's the time to pick the side of the argument you feel you can support the best and summarize your main point into your thesis statement.

Your thesis will be the basis of your entire essay, so make sure you know which side you're on, that you've stated it clearly, and that you stick by your argument throughout the entire essay .

#3: Heavy-Duty Research Time

You've taken a gander at what the internet at large has to say on your argument, but now's the time to actually read those sources and take notes.

Check scholarly journals online at Google Scholar , the Directory of Open Access Journals , or JStor . You can also search individual university or school libraries and websites to see what kinds of academic articles you can access for free. Keep track of your important quotes and page numbers and put them somewhere that's easy to find later.

And don't forget to check your school or local libraries as well!

#4: Outline

Follow the five-paragraph outline structure from the previous section.

Fill in your topic, your reasons, and your supporting evidence into each of the categories.

Before you begin to flesh out the essay, take a look at what you've got. Is your thesis statement in the first paragraph? Is it clear? Is your argument logical? Does your supporting evidence support your reasoning?

By outlining your essay, you streamline your process and take care of any logic gaps before you dive headfirst into the writing. This will save you a lot of grief later on if you need to change your sources or your structure, so don't get too trigger-happy and skip this step.

Now that you've laid out exactly what you'll need for your essay and where, it's time to fill in all the gaps by writing it out.

Take it one step at a time and expand your ideas into complete sentences and substantiated claims. It may feel daunting to turn an outline into a complete draft, but just remember that you've already laid out all the groundwork; now you're just filling in the gaps.

If you have the time before deadline, give yourself a day or two (or even just an hour!) away from your essay . Looking it over with fresh eyes will allow you to see errors, both minor and major, that you likely would have missed had you tried to edit when it was still raw.

Take a first pass over the entire essay and try your best to ignore any minor spelling or grammar mistakes—you're just looking at the big picture right now. Does it make sense as a whole? Did the essay succeed in making an argument and backing that argument up logically? (Do you feel persuaded?)

If not, go back and make notes so that you can fix it for your final draft.

Once you've made your revisions to the overall structure, mark all your small errors and grammar problems so you can fix them in the next draft.

#7: Final Draft

Use the notes you made on the rough draft and go in and hack and smooth away until you're satisfied with the final result.

A checklist for your final draft:

  • Formatting is correct according to your teacher's standards
  • No errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Essay is the right length and size for the assignment
  • The argument is present, consistent, and concise
  • Each reason is supported by relevant evidence
  • The essay makes sense overall

#8: Celebrate!

Once you've brought that final draft to a perfect polish and turned in your assignment, you're done! Go you!

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Be prepared and ♪ you'll never go hungry again ♪, *cough*, or struggle with your argumentative essay-writing again. (Walt Disney Studios)

Good Examples of Argumentative Essays Online

Theory is all well and good, but examples are key. Just to get you started on what a fully-fleshed out argumentative essay looks like, let's see some examples in action.

Check out these two argumentative essay examples on the use of landmines and freons (and note the excellent use of concrete sources to back up their arguments!).

The Use of Landmines

A Shattered Sky

The Take-Aways: Keys to Writing an Argumentative Essay

At first, writing an argumentative essay may seem like a monstrous hurdle to overcome, but with the proper preparation and understanding, you'll be able to knock yours out of the park.

Remember the differences between a persuasive essay and an argumentative one, make sure your thesis is clear, and double-check that your supporting evidence is both relevant to your point and well-sourced . Pick your topic, do your research, make your outline, and fill in the gaps. Before you know it, you'll have yourself an A+ argumentative essay there, my friend.

What's Next?

Now you know the ins and outs of an argumentative essay, but how comfortable are you writing in other styles? Learn more about the four writing styles and when it makes sense to use each .

Understand how to make an argument, but still having trouble organizing your thoughts? Check out our guide to three popular essay formats and choose which one is right for you.

Ready to make your case, but not sure what to write about? We've created a list of 50 potential argumentative essay topics to spark your imagination.

Courtney scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT in high school and went on to graduate from Stanford University with a degree in Cultural and Social Anthropology. She is passionate about bringing education and the tools to succeed to students from all backgrounds and walks of life, as she believes open education is one of the great societal equalizers. She has years of tutoring experience and writes creative works in her free time.

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Argument Writing Topics for Students

20 Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

What is an argument essay.

An argument essay uses logic and reasoning to defend a position or point of view. In an argument essay, research, evidence, and examples are used to convince the reader to consider a different point of view. A strong argument essay also acknowledges the opposing viewpoint. This is known as the counterargument. Ultimately, the counterargument is disputed with evidence in an attempt to convince the reader to support the writer’s  initial claim. 

Argument Writing vs. Opinion Writing

It’s easy to confuse opinion writing and argument writing. Both types of writing require students to take a stand and support it with reasons and evidence. To keep things straight, think of opinion writing as the stepping stone to argument writing.  Most states require students make the switch from opinion writing to argument writing in 5th or 6th grade.

-Opinion writing builds the foundational skill set for argument writing. Opinion writing requires students to take a stand and support their choice with clear and relevant reasons. The purpose of opinion writing is to share a point of view. 

-Argument writing takes the same process a step further. Argument writing requires students to make a claim and support it with research, evidence, and logic. The purpose of argument writing is to convince the reader to consider a different point of view. 

Argument Essay Topics

Should playing video games be considered a sport? Is online school better than in-person school? Should graffiti be considered art? Should college be free? Do we still need libraries? Is physical education important? Is homework necessary? Should cellphones be allowed in school? Which branch of government is the most important?
Should pets be allowed on airplanes? Should internet access be free? Should the Pledge of Allegiance be optional? Are dogs better than cats? Is math the most important school subject? Should the school day be shorter? Are Macs better than PCs? Is social media harmful for kids? Should schools have surveillance cameras in classrooms? Should all people be vegetarians? Should plastic bottles be banned?

Questions to Consider When Picking an Argument Essay Topic:

  • Do you feel strongly about the topic?
  • Does the topic have opposing viewpoints? 
  • Do you have solid reasons to support your argument? 
  • Can you find valid evidence to support your reasons? 

Argumentative Writing Unit for Grades 5-8

Click here to see the step-by-step process for writing argumentative essay. Examples and tips for students are included!

Introduce argumentative writing to all levels of learners with this comprehensive unit! Everything you need to differentiate and scaffold instruction is included with this printable and digital argument writing lesson! Use this bundle of step-by-step materials to guide students through every paragraph and element of argument writing. Make it easy for all students to plan, draft, and revise their essays.

Argument Essay Graphic Organizer for Introduction

Mrs. Spangler in the Middle

Middle School ELA Solutions To Reach Every Learner

How To Increase Argumentative Essay Writing Scores

No more trial and error - here is the secret sauce to increasing essay writing scores!

To Increase Argumentative Essay Writing Scores

1.  start with vocabulary for argumentative essays.   .

Start with vocabulary before teaching middle school students how to write Argumentative Essays.

2.  Focus on the Structure of the Argumentative Essay.  

Learning to write an argumentative essay requires there to be a clear path to follow

3.  Strategic Practice!

This is a great way to practice argumentative essay writing without tons of grading!  #teaching #middleschool

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Argumentative Essay Examples

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Are you looking for argumentative essay examples? Good news – our professional essay writers have compiled several useful samples that can be used for your reference. Sometimes, you would read tons of material on the writing process, but still have no idea where to start from. That’s exactly that moment when you need some good essay examples.  Why is having an excellent sample in front of your eyes so important? Above all, it’s much easier to learn how to write the work from a clearly structured essay example. Besides, you may find tons of inspirational ideas in ready-made samples. So get ready to become inspired by useful insights that we have to offer.

What Is an Argument?

In everyday life, an argument means some misunderstanding between people. But in an academic context, an argument is a list of statements that support or disapprove some point of view.  Typically, you will use your claims to convince people that your viewpoint is true. How to write an argumentative essay ? To write a good argumentative essay, you will need to establish a strong position on the topic and present compelling evidence that backs up your point.  There are two purposes you should keep in mind when building an argument . Your primary goal is to:

  • Change people’s views.
  • Persuade doing something.

There exist 3 main approaches to developing an argument: 

  • Classical It’s a type of argument that the writer or speaker uses to convince the audience to accept their point of view. The main task is to apply effective strategies to persuade someone to take your side. Ethos, pathos and logos are used to convince the audience. It consists of 5 elements: introduction, confirmation, narration, refutation, and conclusion.
  • Toulmin This method is applied when there is no evident solution to the issue discussed. The Toulmin model is used if you are dealing with some complex situation. You will need to break your argumentation into 6 elements: claim, grounds, warrant, backing, qualifier and rebuttal.
  • Rogerian It’s a series of statements that focus on making the audience meet the speaker/ writer halfway. In most cases, an addressee won’t accept your point fully. That’s exactly when you can establish middle ground.

Examples of Argumentative Essays

Getting familiar with an argumentative essay example is a brilliant way to cope with your writing assignment. After studying some successful essays, it will be much easier to start your own work. We offer you to look through several argumentative essay samples attached below. They are divided into categories by an academic level for easier navigation. Feel free to use these samples from our college essay service for your reference and inspiration.

Argumentative Essay Example for Middle School

If you are a middle-school student, you might be interested in an argumentative essay sample for middle school. Check out an example attached below and see how the arguments are built.

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Unlike other academic levels, the writing requirements for middle school are not strict. Here’s a rubric you can use to check whether your writing corresponds with the standard recommendations. 

Structure

Smooth flow of thoughts and clear organization of ideas. 

Introduction

Contains a catchy hook, setting and a powerful thesis statement. The thesis makes a brief preview of the work.

Evidence

Citations and quotes from credible sources are used to prove an argument.

Conclusion

An essay ends with a brief summary and contains further insights or some call to action. 

Word choice & Style

Use of stylistic emphasis and transitional sentences.

Argumentative Essay Sample for High School

Below you can find an argumentative essay example for high school. This essay is written by a persuasive essay writer based on the literary work. Pay attention to how arguments are built and what evidence is used to prove the main position.

Essays written in high schools require stronger professional skills, more detailed structure and a very thoughtful manner of writing. Works have serious topics which need full involvement in your study. Here’re several criteria you shouldn’t skip. 

Structure

Information is given in logical order, writing maintains a clear organization and invites the reader in. The sequence is easy to follow.

Introduction

An opening paragraph includes an informative background. A student clearly defines a problem and goals, and states a strong thesis. 

Evidence

Three good reasons are supported by examples. Evidence shows that in-depth research has been done. 

Conclusion

A concluding paragraph contains a brief summary and strongly states a personal viewpoint. 

Word choice & Style

A student uses an effective word choice that conveys information and convinces readers. 

Some of the successful topics for high-school argumentative writing include:

  • Should religion have place in government?
  • Should marijuana be legalized?
  • What can be done about gun control in the US?
  • Is single-sex education harmful or beneficial to students?

Choose the one you like and use the sample to craft a great writing piece. 

Argumentative Essay Example for College

If you are a college student, here’s an argumentative essay example for college. This essay begins with counter arguments. Then, the writer refutes the opposite position by providing compelling support of the other side.

Essay for college requires much effort and time. You will need to show strong persuasive skills, great focus, and incredible willingness to succeed. Your work should have 4 elements just like any other type of essay:

  • Introductory paragraph.
  • Thesis statement.
  • Body paragraphs.
  • Conclusion for essay .

Your essay can be longer than 5 paragraphs – it depends on the number of claims and counter arguments you want to include. Also, make sure you check this rubric and include all points in your writing.

Structure

An essay has a well-structured organization that allows readers to gradually get familiar with the key ideas and goals of writing. A student uses thought out transitions and presents main points in logical order. 

Introduction

An opening paragraph contains a catchy hook followed by an informative background. There is a clear definition of the problem and goals as well as an effective thesis statement. 

Evidence

At least three compelling reasons are given and supported by good examples. Evidence demonstrates that in-depth research has been done. 

Conclusion

An essay ends with a brief summary and contains a personal viewpoint. Significance of the work is clearly explained. A conclusion leaves readers with thoughts for consideration. 

Word choice & Style

An effective word choice is used to convey information and convince readers.

Short Argumentative Essay Example

Sometimes, you will be asked to write a brief work. In this case, you may be interested in an example of a short argumentative essay. Look through the sample attached below. This will help you get a clear idea on the writing process. 

This type of work requires 3 steps one should follow:

  • Turning the topic into a question and, then, answering it.
  • Stating an argument and proving it with evidence.
  • Outlining (briefly) your main points.

Looking for an argumentative essay outline example ? We have a special blog with a lot of different samples for such kind of an outline.

Final Thoughts

Now that you have looked through some examples of an argumentative essay , it’s time to compose your own work. Remember to develop a strong thesis statement and jam-pack your writing with supporting examples. And the last tip from StudyCrumb: don’t be afraid to provide some room for the opposite side. Include several counterarguments and explain why they are weak. This will make your position sound stronger. 

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FAQ about Argumentative Essay Examples

1. how to give examples in an argumentative essay.

A good argumentative essay should be supported by descent examples. You should use credible sources to find supporting evidence: scholarly articles, scientific works, official websites. Use citations and quotations to refer to your sources. It would be great if you could integrate some statistical numbers in your writing.

2. What is the example of an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay should focus on the debatable issue. There should be two sides of the coin – you should take one side and prove your point. Some good examples for argumentative writing are: 

Is capital punishment effective? 

Does religion cause war?

Does social media make people more lonely?

4. How do I conclude an argumentative essay?

Conclusion of one argumentative essay might be the beginning of another one. To conclude your writing, briefly summarize your key points. Do not introduce any new information in your last paragraph. Emphasize the importance of your viewpoint and finish with some food for thought.

3. Can you start an argumentative essay with a question?

Argumentative essay might start with a rhetorical question or statement. This technique is called a hook. It allows to catch the reader’s attention from the first lines. Then, an author should provide some context related to the topic and create a strong thesis statement.

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Argumentative Essay – Outline, Form, and Examples

What is an argumentative essay.

An argumentative essay requires the writer to investigate a specific topic by collecting and evaluating evidence to establish a position on the subject matter.

When preparing to compose a good argumentative essay, utilize the following steps:

Step 1: Select a topic.

Step 2: Identify a position.

Step 3: Locate appropriate resources.

Step 4: Identify evidence supporting the position. ( NOTE: If there is little evidence in support of the claim, consider re-examining the main argument.)

Steps to write an argumentative essay

When gathering evidence, use credible sources . To determine the credibility of the source, consider authority, currency, accuracy, and objectivity:

Who is the author ? Are they an expert in the field? Has a reputable publisher published the work?

How current is the information in the source? Does the currency of the source matter? Does the age of the source impact the content? Is there newer information that disproves the source’s information?

Can other sources verify the accuracy of the information? Does the information contradict that found in other commonly accepted sources?

Is there any evidence of bias, or is the source objective ? Is the research sponsored by an organization that may skew the information?

The following are typically recognized as providing appropriate, credible research material:

Peer-reviewed journals/research papers

Government agencies

Professional organizations

Library databases

Reference books

Credible sources

Writers should avoid using the following sources:

Social media posts

Out-of-date materials

Step 5: Utilize the research to determine a thesis statement that identifies the topic, position, and support(s).

Step 6: Use the evidence to construct an outline, detailing the main supports and relevant evidence.

Steps to write an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay outline

After gathering all of the necessary research, the next step in composing an argumentative essay focuses on organizing the information through the use of an outline:

Introduction

Attention Grabber/Hook

Background Information: Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the reader needs to know to understand the argument.

Thesis: State the position in connection to the main topic and identify the supports that will help prove the argument.

Topic sentence

Identify evidence in support of the claim in the topic sentence

Explain how the evidence supports the argument

Evidence 3 (Continue as needed)

Support 2 (Continue as needed)

Restate thesis

Review main supports

Concluding statement

Invite the audience to take a specific action.

Identify the overall importance of the topic and position.

Argumentative essay outline

How to write an argumentative essay

Regardless of the writer’s topic or point of view, an argumentative essay should include an introductory paragraph, body paragraphs, a conclusion, and works cited.

Background information

Body Paragraphs

Analysis of evidence

Rephrased thesis

Review of main ideas

Call to action

Works Cited

Components of an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay introduction

The introduction sets the tone for the entire paper and introduces the argument. In general, the first paragraph(s) should attract the reader’s attention, provide relevant context, and conclude with a thesis statement.

To attract the reader's attention , start with an introductory device. There are several attention-grabbing techniques, the most common of which consist of the following:

The writer can emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or indicating that the subject is influential.

Pertinent statistics give the paper an air of authority.

There are many reasons for a stimulating statement to surprise a reader. Sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is shocking; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the subject and focus of what follows.

Provide the reader with relevant context and background information necessary to understand the topic.

Conclude with a thesis statement that identifies the overall purpose of the essay (topic and position). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Avoid the following when writing the introduction to argumentative writing:

Starting with dictionary definitions is too overdone and unappealing.

Do not make an announcement of the topic like “In this paper I will…” or “The purpose of this essay is to….”

Evidence supporting or developing the thesis should be in the body paragraphs, not the introduction.

Beginning the essay with general or absolute statements such as “throughout history...” or “as human beings we always...” or similar statements suggest the writer knows all of history or that all people behave or think in the same way.

Argumentative essay thesis

The thesis statement is the single, specific claim the writer sets out to prove and is typically positioned as the last sentence of the introduction . It is the controlling idea of the entire argument that identifies the topic, position, and reasoning.

When constructing a thesis for an argumentative paper, make sure it contains a side of the argument, not simply a topic. An argumentative thesis identifies the writer’s position on a given topic. If a position cannot be taken, then it is not argumentative thesis:

Topic: Capital punishment is practiced in many states.

Thesis: Capital punishment should be illegal.

While not always required, the thesis statement can include the supports the writer will use to prove the main claim. Therefore, a thesis statement can be structured as follows:

TOPIC + POSITION (+ SUPPORTS)

No Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION).

Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION) because they sacrifice their minds and bodies (SUPPORT 1), cannot hold

Argumentative essay body paragraphs

Body paragraphs can be of varying lengths, but they must present a coherent argument unified under a single topic. They are rarely ever longer than one page, double-spaced; usually they are much shorter.

Lengthy paragraphs indicate a lack of structure. Identify the main ideas of a lengthy paragraph to determine if they make more sense as separate topics in separate paragraphs.

Shorter paragraphs usually indicate a lack of substance; there is not enough evidence or analysis to prove the argument. Develop the ideas more or integrate the information into another paragraph.

The structure of an argumentative paragraph should include a topic sentence, evidence, and a transition.

The topic sentence is the thesis of the paragraph that identifies the arguable point in support of the main argument. The reader should know exactly what the writer is trying to prove within the paragraph by reading the first sentence.

The supporting evidence and analysis provide information to support the claim. There should be a balance between the evidence (facts, quotations, summary of events/plot, etc.) and analysis (interpretation of evidence). If the paragraph is evidence-heavy, there is not much of an argument; if it is analysis-heavy, there is not enough evidence in support of the claim.

The transition can be at the beginning or the end of a paragraph. However, it is much easier to combine the transition with the concluding observation to help the paragraphs flow into one another. Transitions in academic writing should tell the reader where you were, where you are going, and relate to the thesis.

Some essays may benefit from the inclusion of rebuttals to potential counterarguments of the writer’s position.

Argumentative essay conclusion

The conclusion should make readers glad they read the paper. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest readers but also enrich their understanding in some way. There are three aspects to follow when constructing the conclusion: rephrase the thesis, synthesize information, and call the reader to action.

Rephrased the thesis in the first sentence of the conclusion. It must be in different words; do not simply write it verbatim.

Synthesize the argument by showing how the paper's main points support the argument.

Propose a course of action or a solution to an issue. This can redirect the reader's thought process to apply the ideas to their life or to see the broader implications of the topic.

Avoid the following when constructing the conclusion:

Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as "in conclusion," "in summary," or "in closing;" although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as trite in writing

Introducing a new idea or subtopic in the conclusion

Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of the paper

Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper

Argumentative essay examples

Examples of argumentative essays vary depending upon the type:

Academic essays differ based upon the topic and position. These essays follow a more traditional structure and are typically assigned in high school or college. Examples of academic argumentative essay topics include the following:

Advantages or disadvantages of social media

Animal testing

Art education

Benefit or detriment of homework

Capital punishment

Class warfare

Immigration

School uniforms

Universal healthcare

Violence in video games

Argumentative literary essays are typically more informal and do not follow the same structure as an academic essay. The following are popular examples of argumentative literary essays:

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf

“Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell

“Thoughts for the Times on War and Death” by Sigmund Freud

“Does the Truth Matter? Science, Pseudoscience, and Civilization” by Carl Sagan

“Self-Reliance” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

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A Selection Of Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

The argumentative essay lessons begin in middle school, when the young minds are ready to start defending ideas with logic and reason. Even though the classes talk about serious educational content, middle school students still love to have fun. For argumentative essays to be taken seriously, the topics need to be geared toward those young minds. Here are some topic ideas that will get the creativity and arguments flowing:

Young teens enjoy writing about their school experiences.

  • Should students in middle school be tested for drugs?
  • Are too many students in your school getting A’s?
  • Should every student be required to take gym and music classes?
  • Should your teachers use more group work in their classes?
  • Should the school day be longer so you can go to school for four days instead of five?
  • What should be done with bullies and cyberbullies?
  • Should corporal punishment be reinstituted in schools?
  • Should schools have more dances?
  • Should students be able to choose their own schedules?
  • Do class sizes affect the success of students?

Students are interested in entertainment.

  • Does TV need more diverse actors and actresses?
  • Does TV still matter?
  • What musician will be the next legendary performer?
  • Is video gaming a sport?
  • What makes a television commercial a hit?
  • What are three best movies of the year?
  • Do TV shows promote risky behavior?
  • What children’s book characters could be the next TV hit?

Sports is always a good topic for junior high students.

  • Is football too violent to be a part of school athletics?
  • Should college athletes get paid?
  • Is baseball still a relevant sport?
  • Is cheerleading a sport?
  • Should athletic organizations establish rules for coaches about the way the talk to players?
  • Are travel sports necessary?

Junior high students love their technology as much as high school students do.

  • What is the right age to get a cell phone?
  • Should students be allowed to have cell phones in class?
  • Do you have more good friends or fewer because of technology?
  • Do people use their smartphones for useful reasons or to waste time?
  • What is the next social media platform that will be popular?
  • Is online learning or face-to-face learning better?
  • Should companies be allowed to collect information about your spending habits?
  • Are printed books or ebooks better?
  • Are online product reviews reliable?
  • How much time should people spend on social media each day?

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101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

Use your words to sway the reader.

Persuasive Essay Topics: Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life.  Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative , but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It’s important to know your audience so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them. Try reading some mentor texts to show kids great examples of opinion writing. Then use these persuasive essay topics for practice.

School and Education Persuasive Essay Topics

Life and ethics persuasive essay topics, science and technology persuasive essay topics, sports and entertainment persuasive essay topics, just for fun persuasive essay topics.

  

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?
  • Should we stop giving final exams?
  • Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

  • Which is better, private schools or public schools?
  • Should every student have to participate in athletics?
  • Do you think schools should ban junk food from their cafeterias?
  • Should students be required to volunteer in their communities?
  • What is the most important school subject?
  • Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

  • Is it ever OK to cheat on homework or a test?
  • Should students get to grade their teachers?
  • Do you think college should be free for anyone who wants to attend?
  • Should schools be allowed to ban some books from their libraries?
  • Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

  • Should all students have to learn a foreign language?
  • Are single-gender schools better or worse for students?
  • Is it OK to eat animals?
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Visit an animal shelter, choose an animal that needs a home, and write an essay persuading someone to adopt that animal.
  • If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

  • Who faces more peer pressure, girls or boys?
  • Should all Americans be required to vote?
  • Is it better to be kind or truthful?
  • Which is better, giving or receiving?
  • Is it OK to keep animals in zoos?
  • Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

  • Which is more important, happiness or success?
  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is social media helpful or harmful?
  • Should parents be punished for their children’s mistakes or crimes?
  • Should kids have set bedtimes or just go to bed when they’re sleepy?
  • Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

  • Is it better to save your allowance or spend it?
  • Should we ban plastic bags and bottles?
  • Which is better, living in the city or in the country?
  • If I could make a new law, it would be …
  • Is Pluto a planet?
  • Should human cloning be legal?
  • Should vaccines be mandatory?
  • Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

  • Should testing on animals be made illegal?
  • Will expanded use of artificial intelligence be good for humanity?
  • Should all people have free Internet access in their homes?
  • Is there intelligent life on other planets?
  • Does technology create more jobs than it eliminates?
  • Should parents use their children’s cell phones to track where they are?
  • Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

  • What’s the best type of smartphone: Android or iPhone?
  • Which is better, Macs or PCs?
  • Do people rely too much on technology in the modern world?
  • Should cryptocurrencies replace cash?
  • Should there be a minimum age requirement to own a smartphone?
  • Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

  • Should kids under 13 be allowed to use social media sites?
  • Should we ban cigarette smoking and vaping entirely?
  • Is it better to be an animal that lives in the water or on land?
  • Should kids be allowed to watch TV on school nights?
  • Which is better, paper books or e-books?
  • Is the current movie rating system (G, PG, PG-13, etc.) effective?
  • Are video games better than board games?
  • Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

  • Which is better, reading books or watching TV?
  • Does playing violent video games make people more violent in real life?
  • Are graphic novels just as valuable as traditional fictional books?
  • Should everyone play on the same sports teams, regardless of gender?
  • Choose a book that’s been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

Choose a book that's been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Are professional athletes/musicians/actors overpaid?
  • Which is better, fiction or nonfiction?
  • The best music genre is …
  • What is one book that everyone should read?
  • What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

  • What’s the best video game system?
  • Does playing video games make you smarter?
  • Does reality TV actually depict real life?
  • Should all neighborhoods have free parks and playgrounds?
  • What’s the best holiday?
  • The very best food of all time is …
  • Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

  • What’s the best season of the year?
  • Should you put ketchup on a hot dog?
  • Is a taco a sandwich?
  • Does fruit count as dessert?
  • Should people have to go to school or work on their birthday?
  • Are clowns scary or funny?
  • Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

  • The best pizza topping is …
  • What would be the best superpower to have?
  • Should everyone make their bed every day?
  • Which came first, the chicken or the egg?
  • Should you put pineapple on a pizza?
  • Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

  • Describe the world’s best ice cream sundae.
  • Is Monday the worst day of the week?
  • Would you rather travel back in time or forward in time?
  • Is it better to be too hot or too cold?
  • Are there aliens living among us here on Earth?

What are your favorite persuasive essay topics for students? Come exchange ideas in the We Are Teachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, check out the big list of essay topics for high school (120+ ideas) ..

Need some ideas for practicing persuasive writing skills? These persuasive essay topics provide lots of scope for students of all ages.

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argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

20 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

An argumentative essay is designed to explain to your reader information about one side of an argument. It is a lot like a persuasive essay because the idea is to explain one side of an issue but the idea is to present the facts without your opinion involved. A persuasive essay would display personal opinions. So for an argumentative essay simply state which side of the issue you believe in and then give your reasoning as to why you believe it.

There are some great topics to consider when choosing a topic for your argumentative essay. You would choose a topic that interests you. Once you have the topic, answer the question and then support your answer with at least three reasons why you believe it. For example, if you take the first option on the list, you can write that sports should not be coed and then tell your reader three reasons why it shouldn’t be coed.

  • Should sports be coed?
  • Should schools sell fast food?
  • Should students wear school uniforms?
  • Should there be harsher punishments for bullying?
  • Is it fair to ban preteenagers and teenagers from the mall without adult supervision?
  • Should there be less homework?
  • When are you old enough to stay home alone?
  • Should middle school students still have a bed time?
  • Does summer school benefit the student?
  • How would you change the school lunch menu?
  • Should school sports be mandatory?
  • Do kids watch too much television?
  • Should kids have chores?
  • Should you have to wear your seat belt on the bus?
  • Should students who play sports still have to take Gym class?
  • Should children be more concerned with what they eat so that they don’t have health problems when they get older?
  • Should you get a larger allowance?
  • Should school be year round with more breaks to improve education?
  • Do violent games and television shows make kids violent?
  • Should your school have a school newspaper?

Any one of these topics would work well. They are designed to establish a question pertaining to a conflicted view and then challenge yourself to prove your stance. Therefore, you would tell your side of the dispute and then for each body paragraph talk about a different reason why you believe it.

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Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Examples

Nova A.

Argumentative Essay Examples - Samples & Tips

20 min read

argumentative essay examples

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The Ultimate Guide to Argumentative Essay Writing

Good Argumentative Essay Topics For Beginners - 270+ Ideas

Argumentative Essay Outline | Structure Your Essay In 5 Steps

Learn Different Types of Arguments and Argument Claims

Argumentative writing can be challenging, but the right resources can make it easier.

An argumentative essay involves presenting a clear position supported by evidence and logic. Fortunately, there's a wealth of helpful tools available, and one of the most effective is examining strong examples of argumentative essays.

Our blog offers a wide range of high-quality essay samples and expert tips to help you write convincing essays. By looking at these examples, you'll learn how to build your arguments, organize your ideas, use persuasive techniques, and present your case clearly. 

So let’s dive in!

Arrow Down

  • 1. Basics of Argumentative Essay
  • 2. Argumentative Essay Examples For Students 
  • 3. Good Argumentative Essay Examples PDFs
  • 4. Tips for Writing an Argumentative Essay
  • 5. Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

Basics of Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay is a genre of academic essay writing where the author presents a claim or stance on a particular issue and supports it with evidence, reasoning, and analysis. The purpose of this type of essay is to persuade the reader to agree with the author's viewpoint through logical argumentation.

While the standard five-paragraph format is commonly used, it's not mandatory for argumentative essays. These essays often adopt either the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model. 

  • The Toulmin model emphasizes a clear claim, evidence to support the claim, reasoning that connects the evidence to the claim, and rebuttals of counterarguments. 
  • The Rogerian model focuses on finding common ground and understanding between conflicting viewpoints, aiming for mutual understanding rather than direct persuasion.

Argumentative Essay Examples For Students 

In this section, we will look at examples of argumentative essays for different school levels. Whether you are in middle school or university, these examples can help you learn how to make good arguments. 

Argumentative Essay Examples For Kids 

Online learning in school is a great idea because it offers many benefits. First, it allows students to learn at their own pace. Some students learn quickly, while others need more time. Online classes let everyone move at a speed that is best for them.

Second, online learning provides access to many resources. Students can watch videos, play educational games, and use interactive tools that make learning fun and engaging. These resources can help students understand difficult topics better.

Third, online learning is flexible. If a student is sick or cannot attend school, they can still learn from home. This means they won't miss important lessons and can keep up with their classmates.

In conclusion, online learning in school is beneficial because it allows students to learn at their own pace, provides access to a variety of resources, and offers flexibility. These advantages can help students succeed in their studies and enjoy learning.

What this essay does well:

  • The thesis statement is clear and easy to understand, presented in the first sentence.
  • Each paragraph focuses on a specific benefit of online learning (personalized pace, access to resources, flexibility).
  • Logical structure makes the argument easy to follow for young readers.

How this essay could be improved:

  • Add stories or examples to show how online learning helps.
  • Briefly mention and refute concerns about online learning, like too much screen time or missing friends.
  • Include more specific information to make the argument stronger.

Zoos are places where animals are kept for people to see, but are they ethical? Some people think zoos are bad for animals, but I believe zoos are good for several reasons.

First, zoos help protect endangered animals. Many animals are in danger of disappearing forever, and zoos provide a safe place for them to live and breed. This helps increase their numbers and prevents them from going extinct.

Second, zoos educate people about animals. When people visit zoos, they learn about different species and how to protect them. This knowledge can inspire people to care more about animals and take action to help them in the wild.

Third, zoos provide medical care for animals. Animals in the wild can get sick or injured and may not survive. In zoos, there are veterinarians who can take care of these animals and help them get better.

In conclusion, while some may argue against the ethics of keeping animals in zoos, the benefits of conservation, education, and medical care outweigh the concerns. Zoos play a vital role in preserving endangered species, educating the public, and providing necessary healthcare for animals in need. This demonstrates that zoos can be ethical institutions that contribute positively to animal welfare and conservation efforts worldwide.

  • The thesis is clearly stated at the beginning of the essay.
  • It outlines the author's stance on whether zoos are ethical.
  • The essay presents reasons why zoos are considered ethical.
  • Each paragraph discusses a different reason supporting the thesis.
  • Counter argument is mention towards the end of the essay. 
  • Improvements:
  • Adding specific examples of endangered animals saved by zoos would make the argument stronger.
  • Providing more details on how zoos educate people and provide medical care would enhance the essay.

Argumentative Essay Examples For High School 


Imagine a future where every student, regardless of their financial background, has the opportunity to pursue their dreams and contribute to society without the weight of tuition fees holding them back.

In recent years, the cost of college tuition has skyrocketed, leaving many students and families struggling with enormous debt. According to a report by the College Board, average tuition and fees for in-state students at public universities have more than doubled over the past two decades. This financial burden often discourages talented individuals from pursuing higher education and limits social mobility.

While implementing free college education may pose challenges, it is essential for creating a more equitable society, reducing economic disparities, and ensuring that education remains a fundamental right rather than a privilege.

Free college education would level the playing field by providing equal opportunities for students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. It would empower more individuals to pursue higher education without financial constraints, ultimately leading to a more educated and skilled workforce. Investing in higher education pays off in the long run. Graduates tend to earn higher incomes, contribute more to the economy through taxes, and rely less on social welfare programs. This economic boost can offset the initial costs of free college education. Critics argue that free education might compromise quality due to increased demand and strain on resources. However, proper funding and effective management can ensure that educational standards are maintained, benefiting both students and institutions.

Opponents contend that free college education would strain government budgets and lead to higher taxes. However, studies show that the economic benefits outweigh the costs, and alternative funding sources, such as reallocating existing subsidies or imposing higher taxes on the wealthy, could mitigate financial concerns.

In conclusion, while the debate over free college education is complex, the potential benefits of increased access, reduced economic inequality, and enhanced societal well-being outweigh the challenges. By prioritizing education as a public good, society can create a more equitable future where talent and ambition—not financial means—determine success in higher education and beyond.

  • Thesis Placement: The thesis is stated clearly in the third paragraph, outlining the author's stance on free college education.
  • Effective Counter-Argument: The essay begins by acknowledging concerns about free college education, then systematically refutes these arguments with supporting evidence.
  • Use of Data: The author supports their points with facts and studies, making the argument more persuasive.
  • Refutation of Opposing Views: Each counter-argument is addressed and countered, strengthening the author's position.
  • More Examples: Adding specific examples of individuals benefiting from free education would enhance the essay's impact.
  • Focus on Data: Remove personal experiences and ensure all arguments are supported solely by data and research.
  • Accuracy of Points: Verify all facts to ensure accuracy, such as the cost comparison between digital and physical books.

Here is another sample in PDF format that you can download and read for free!

Argumentative Essay Example for High School

Argumentative Essay Examples For College Students

In college, writing essays gets more challenging. Students need to write more advanced assignments like research papers or a thesis .

Let’s take a look at the argumentative essay examples for college level. 

In the ongoing debate over college admissions, the question of whether socioeconomic status (SES) should be a factor has garnered significant attention. While some argue that merit alone should determine admission, others contend that considering SES can promote diversity and equal opportunity. This essay explores both perspectives to determine the merits of incorporating SES into college admissions criteria.

College admissions are a crucial gateway to higher education and future opportunities. The criteria used to evaluate applicants play a pivotal role in shaping student demographics and societal equity.

Currently, college admissions predominantly rely on academic achievements, standardized test scores, and extracurricular activities. However, critics argue that this approach disadvantages students from underprivileged backgrounds who may lack access to resources and opportunities.

Including socioeconomic status as a factor in college admissions is essential for promoting socioeconomic diversity, leveling the playing field, and fostering a more inclusive educational environment.

SES-based admissions can enrich campus diversity by admitting students with varied life experiences and perspectives. This diversity enhances learning environments and prepares students for global citizenship. Students from lower SES backgrounds often face systemic barriers that affect their academic performance and access to opportunities. Considering SES acknowledges these challenges and provides a fairer evaluation of their achievements and potential. By admitting students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, colleges can create a more inclusive environment where all students feel valued and supported. This fosters a sense of belonging and improves overall student outcomes.

Opponents argue that SES-based admissions may compromise academic standards and overlook merit-based achievements. However, proponents argue that holistic evaluations can consider both academic merit and the unique challenges faced by students from lower SES backgrounds.

In conclusion, while the debate over SES-based admissions is complex, incorporating socioeconomic status into college admissions criteria can promote diversity, enhance equal opportunity, and create a more inclusive educational environment. By recognizing the impact of socioeconomic factors on student success, colleges can strive towards a fairer and more equitable admissions process that benefits all students and society as a whole.

Analysis 

  • Effective Counter-Argument: The essay begins by acknowledging concerns about SES-based admissions, then systematically refutes these arguments with specific data and studies.
  • Use of Evidence: Numerous facts and studies are cited to support the arguments, making the essay more persuasive.
  • Refutation of Opposing Views: Each counter-argument is addressed and countered, strengthening the author's position in favor of SES-based admissions.
  • More Examples: Adding specific examples of how students from lower SES backgrounds have thrived in college settings would enhance the essay's impact.
  • Focus on Data: Remove personal experiences or opinions and ensure all arguments are supported solely by factual evidence and research.
  • Accuracy of Points: Verify all facts to ensure accuracy, such as the cost comparisons between digital and physical books, to strengthen the credibility of the essay.

Here is another PDF example for you;

Argumentative Essay Example For College

Argumentative Essay Examples For University Students

At this level, you might have to pick special and advanced topics for argumentative essays. You might also need unique argumentative research paper topics for your research assignments.

In the contemporary landscape of technological advancement, the concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI) has emerged as a contentious solution to mitigate the socio-economic impacts of automation. As machines and artificial intelligence increasingly replace human labor, concerns about unemployment, income inequality, and societal stability have escalated. This essay explores whether Universal Basic Income is a sustainable remedy to these challenges, examining its potential benefits, drawbacks, and overall feasibility.

Technological advancements, particularly in automation and artificial intelligence, have revolutionized industries across the globe. While these innovations promise efficiency and economic growth, they also raise significant concerns about job displacement and income inequality. The idea of Universal Basic Income, providing every citizen with a regular stipend regardless of their employment status, has gained traction as a potential solution to these impending challenges.

While Universal Basic Income offers compelling advantages in the face of automation, its sustainability hinges on careful implementation, fiscal feasibility, and its ability to address underlying socioeconomic issues.

UBI can act as a safety net for workers displaced by automation, providing financial security while they retrain or seek new opportunities. With a basic income assured, individuals are more likely to take risks in starting businesses or pursuing creative endeavors, stimulating economic dynamism. UBI has the potential to lift many out of poverty and reduce the wealth gap, enhancing social stability and cohesion.

Critics argue that funding UBI on a large scale is impractical and may necessitate substantial tax increases or cuts in existing welfare programs. Some fear that UBI could disincentivize work, leading to a decline in productivity and innovation. The logistics of distributing UBI fairly and effectively to all citizens pose significant challenges, especially in diverse socio-economic contexts.

Various pilot programs worldwide, such as those in Finland and Canada, have yielded mixed results but offer valuable insights into the potential impact of UBI. As automation progresses, the need for adaptive social policies like UBI becomes increasingly urgent, requiring ongoing evaluation and adjustment.

In summary, while Universal Basic Income presents a promising avenue to address the socio-economic upheavals triggered by automation, its viability hinges on navigating substantial challenges. Effective implementation, fiscal prudence, and a nuanced understanding of its societal impacts are crucial. As technology continues to reshape our world, embracing innovative solutions like UBI may prove essential in fostering a more equitable and resilient society.

As we contemplate the future of work and welfare in an automated age, the debate over Universal Basic Income remains pivotal. By critically evaluating its potential benefits and drawbacks, policymakers and society at large can chart a path toward a more inclusive and sustainable future.

  • Clear Thesis Development: The essay introduces its thesis effectively after discussing the counter-argument, focusing the essay's entirety on supporting the thesis.
  • Use of Facts and Studies: Specific data and studies are cited throughout, enhancing the credibility of the arguments presented.
  • Effective Refutation of Counter-arguments: Counter-arguments are systematically dismantled, reinforcing the author's viewpoint.
  • Expand with Examples: Incorporating more detailed examples would enrich the essay's content.
  • Avoid Personal Opinion: Ensuring the focus remains on objective evidence rather than personal anecdotes or opinions.
  • Ensure Accuracy of Claims: Verifying the accuracy of all statements, especially those regarding facts and figures, is essential to maintaining credibility.

Take a look at the argumentative essay for university PDF sample below:

Argumentative Essay Example For University

Good Argumentative Essay Examples PDFs

Below are some more argumentative essay samples for you to review. Take a look for further understanding.

Short Argumentative Essay Examples

There is no precise word count for an argumentative essay. It just has to persuade the reader and give the author's message to the intended audience.

It can be short or lengthy. It would be considered correct as long as there's a discussion in it.

The clattering of textile mills and the rise of steam-powered machinery not only heralded an era of unprecedented production but also reshaped the fabric of human existence forever. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, most economies were primarily agrarian, with goods produced by hand or simple tools. The advent of mechanization and factory systems in Britain and later worldwide revolutionized production methods, leading to urbanization, mass production, and significant social changes. The Industrial Revolution brought about profound economic growth, social transformation, and cultural shifts, but it also sparked debates over labor conditions, urbanization challenges, and inequality, ultimately shaping the modern world.

Some argue that the Industrial Revolution primarily benefited the wealthy industrialists while exploiting the labor of the working class, leading to widespread social unrest and economic inequality.

While the Industrial Revolution propelled humanity into an era of unprecedented innovation and economic growth, its legacy is a complex tapestry of progress and challenges. Its profound impact on economies, societies, and cultures continues to shape our modern world, reminding us of the enduring consequences of industrialization and the ongoing pursuit of balance between progress and social equity.

Here is a PDF sample of a short argumentative essay.

Short Argumentative Essay Example

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Examples

The traditional argumentative essay outline consists of 5 paragraphs: one introduction, three body paragraphs, and one conclusion. 

Here are 5 paragraph argumentative essay examples in pdf format.

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Example

Sample 5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay

Tips for Writing an Argumentative Essay

Here are some tips for writing a strong argumentative essay:

Tip#1. Make a Clear and Definitive Thesis Statement

Your thesis statement should be unmistakable and clearly outline your position on the issue. A well-defined thesis guides the entire essay, making your argument remains focused and coherent throughout.

Tip#2. Critique the Weaknesses of the Opposing Viewpoint 

A key aspect of persuasive writing skills involves addressing the opposing viewpoint directly. To strengthen your argument, systematically dismantle the weaknesses of the counter-argument. This demonstrates your thorough understanding of the topic and reinforces the validity of your own stance.

Tip#3. Support Your Claims with Concrete Evidence

An effective argumentative essay requires substantiating your points with credible sources. Whether citing research studies, statistical data, or expert opinions, evidence adds authority and persuasiveness to your arguments. 

This not only enhances the credibility of your essay but also convinces readers of the validity of your perspective.

Tip#4. Evaluate the Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Own Argument

Unlike persuasive essays , which may focus more on appealing to emotions or values, an argumentative essay requires a critical evaluation of your own argument. 

Identify potential weaknesses or limitations in your reasoning and address them honestly. This strengthens your overall argument and demonstrates intellectual honesty.

Tip#5. Use Language as a Powerful Tool to Convey Conviction

In writing a good argumentative essay, language serves as a powerful tool to convey conviction and clarity. Choose a precise and assertive language to articulate your points effectively. Avoid vague or ambiguous terms that may weaken your argument. 

Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

Here are some argumentative essay examples topics that will help you in brainstorming your own essay title:

  • Should the government impose a curfew on teens?
  • Should alcohol advertisements be banned?
  • Are cell phones dangerous to our health?
  • Is global warming real or fake?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory?
  • Does the social media influence gender roles in society?
  • Is nuclear energy safe?
  • Should the death penalty be abolished?
  • Should abortion be legal in the United States?
  • Is animal testing necessary?

If you are looking for a comprehensive list of topics, check out our argumentative essay topics blog!

In summary, we've explored a wide range of example for different academic levels. These examples will help you in creating strong arguments and using persuasive writing effectively. 

Remember, a good argumentative essay isn't just about stating your opinion. It's about stating it clearly, supporting it with solid evidence, and presenting it convincingly.

Moreover, if you need help with writing argumentative essays, our expert writers are here for you. You can trust our legit essay writing service to help you craft engaging argumentative essays.

With us, you will get 24/7 customer support, timely delivery, free revisions, and more benefits! So place your order at our argumentative essay writing service today!

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you start a good argumentative essay example.

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Start with a hook that grabs the reader's attention, such as a startling statistic or a compelling question, followed by a clear thesis statement that states your position on the topic.

Can you use examples in an argumentative essay?

Yes, using examples is important in an argumentative essay to illustrate and support your points, provide evidence, and strengthen your overall argument.

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Home — Essay Types — Argumentative Essay

Argumentative Essay Examples

When it comes to crafting compelling argumentative essays, the choice of your topic plays a pivotal role. Argumentative essay topics are the cornerstone of your paper's success. They provide the foundation upon which you'll build your persuasive arguments. To ensure your essay engages your audience effectively, consider the following aspects:

  • Relevance: Choose topics that are relevant to your field of study or the subject matter at hand. The more closely your topic aligns with your course content, the easier it will be to present a well-informed argument.
  • Interest: Opt for topics that genuinely interest you. Your enthusiasm will shine through in your writing, making it more engaging for your readers.
  • Controversy: Look for topics that have a debatable aspect. Controversial subjects often lead to more compelling arguments, as they offer multiple perspectives to explore.

Examples of Best Topics for Argumentative Essays

  • Is the cost of college too high?
  • Is homeschooling on par with traditional schooling?
  • Can online education be as effective as in-person learning?
  • Debate Clubs: Boosting Critical Thinking & Academic Success
  • Examining the Impact of Online Learning on Educational Equity
  • Are school uniforms beneficial?
  • Is a gap year beneficial for students before starting college?

Health & Nutrition

  • Argumentative Analysis of the Fast Food Industry
  • Can vegetarian diets be healthy for all stages of life?
  • Should smoking be banned in public places?

Science & Technology

  • Should governments regulate social media platforms?
  • Is climate change the biggest threat facing humanity?
  • Is space exploration worth the investment?
  • Technology in Education: Enhancing vs. Hindering Learning
  • Should genetically modified foods be sold with a warning label?
  • Impact of Technological Dependence on Human Cognitive Abilities

Examples of Good Topics for Argumentative Essays

Social issues.

  • Do video games contribute to youth violence?
  • Is a universal basic income a viable solution to poverty?
  • Cyberbullying's Impact on Mental Health: Role of Technology
  • Reevaluating Animal Testing Ethics: An Argumentative Review
  • Is the death penalty an effective deterrent to serious crimes?
  • Should countries have a one-car-per-family policy to control emissions?
  • Are professional athletes overpaid?
  • The Impact of Immigration on National Security: A Critical Analysis
  • Should voting be compulsory for all eligible citizens?
  • Are security cameras an invasion of privacy?

Environment

  • Should animal testing be banned?
  • The Ethics of Climate Change
  • The Ethics of Global Warming
  • Should recycling be mandatory?
  • Government and Corporate Responsibility in Combating Climate Change

Selecting the right argumentative essay topic is a critical step in the essay-writing process. By choosing relevant, interesting, and controversial topics for argument essays, you can enhance your essay's visibility and impact. Moreover, maintaining a balanced approach to argumentation will ensure your essay is both persuasive and comprehensive. For further guidance, consider referring to argumentative essay examples to refine your writing skills and gain valuable insights.

Argumentative essays, widely recognized as a prevalent form of essay writing in academic settings, meld persuasive arguments with fact-based research to create a potent means of swaying an individual’s viewpoint. If an argumentative essay poses a challenge for you or if you’re eager to deepen your understanding of them, exploring argumentative essay examples can provide significant assistance and insights.

What Is an Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay is a form of writing that presents a central argument or claim about a specific topic and supports it with evidence, logic, and reasoning. Unlike other types of essays that might focus on narrating a story, describing a process, or exploring concepts in a balanced manner, an argumentative essay takes a clear stance on an issue and aims to persuade the reader to see the topic from the writer’s perspective.

Argumentative essays, widely recognized as a prevalent form of essay writing in academic settings, meld persuasive arguments with fact-based research to create a potent means of swaying an individual’s viewpoint. If an argumentative essay poses a challenge for you or if you’re eager to deepen your understanding of them, exploring argumentative essay examples , such as “Smoking Should Be Banned” argumentative essay can provide significant assistance and insights.

The aim of an argumentative essay is not only to present arguments and evidence in favor of the author’s viewpoint but also to consider and refute opposing viewpoints, providing a balanced and well-reasoned debate. Students and writers may find free argumentative essay examples to be useful guides for structuring and crafting their own essays, offering insights into effective argumentation and persuasive techniques.

A crucial element in an argumentative essay is acknowledging opposing viewpoints. This shows that the writer has considered alternative perspectives, enhancing the essay’s credibility. Addressing counterarguments and refuting them with logic and evidence demonstrates the strength of the original argument.

In essence, an argumentative essay is a powerful tool for expressing opinions, influencing perspectives, and engaging in intellectual debates. Through careful research, strategic argumentation, and persuasive writing, students can master the art of argumentative essay writing, effectively conveying their viewpoints on complex issues.

How to Start an Argumentative Essay

Starting an argumentative essay, especially for beginners, can be a nuanced task. The process involves crafting a concise and compelling introduction to present and persuade your viewpoint, followed by body paragraphs that both support your thesis and discuss your argument’s strengths and weaknesses. Concluding formally, summarizing key points, and referring to relevant examples enhance understanding and effectiveness in presenting the argument. This process, while straightforward, might pose challenges for new writers.

To enhance understanding and effectiveness in articulating your position, incorporating argumentative essay examples at strategic points within your essay can serve as a valuable tool. These examples not only demonstrate how to effectively structure and present arguments but also offer insights into engaging with counterarguments and employing persuasive techniques. For beginners, observing how these elements are woven into successful essays can illuminate the path from a simple statement of opinion to a compelling argumentative essay. This holistic approach, from introduction through to conclusion, enriched with carefully selected examples, ensures that the essay resonates with readers and leaves a lasting impact.

The pre-writing process entails developing a strategic outline that guides the writer in crafting their essay. Here are the steps to devise a plan for your argumentative essay:

  • Discover your topic. When you are told to start with an argumentative essay, you should take your time to explore argumentative essay topics first. Selecting a potent topic is fundamental to crafting a compelling argumentative essay. It all comes down to narrowing things down. Even when you have to talk about your argumentation dealing with medical marijuana or the importance of social media for college students, you must explore what’s currently trending and what evidence must be provided. A suitable subject should be both of interest and prevalent in your society, aiming to persuasively engage readers. 
  • Research and Argument Strategy. Involves thoroughly investigating a topic to collect supporting data and deciding on a logical approach for presenting your argument, while also identifying and preparing to refute opposing viewpoints. This step ensures your argumentative essay is both robust and persuasive.
  • Outline Creation. The outlined structure for an argumentative essay traditionally follows a five-paragraph format, encompassing an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. This table categorizes and succinctly describes the primary components of each essay section, offering a straightforward reference for organizing an argumentative essay.
  • Writing and Revision. Begin writing, ensuring consistency and coherence in your argumentation. Review, revise, and refine your content for logical flow and persuasiveness.
  • Proofreading, Editing, and Feedback. Perform thorough proofreading for any grammatical or spelling errors and ensure clarity and precision in your writing. Seek feedback from peers or mentors and make any final necessary refinements to your essay.

By following these steps and examining argumentative essay examples, beginners can develop the skills needed to create compelling and persuasive essays.

Example of Argumentative Essay Structure

Exploring the structure of an argumentative essay is crucial for any writer looking to persuade their audience effectively. This essay type hinges on a clear, logical progression of ideas, supporting evidence, and a compelling thesis statement that ties everything together. By dissecting an example of argumentative essay, we can uncover the foundational elements that make these essays persuasive and impactful. Each part of the essay, from the introduction to the conclusion, plays a pivotal role in presenting the argument coherently and persuasively. Through examining a well-structured example, writers can gain insights into how to effectively organize their thoughts, present their arguments, and engage their readers. This exploration will not only illuminate the essential components of an argumentative essay but also demonstrate how these elements interconnect to present a convincing argument.

The conventional format of five paragraphs is frequently adopted for argumentative essays, though it’s not obligatory. Such essays usually adopt either the Toulmin or Rogerian strategies for structuring arguments.

  • Predominantly utilized, the Toulmin strategy initiates with an introductory section, proceeds to present a thesis or claim, and furnishes data and proof to buttress that assertion. This approach further incorporates refutations to opposing viewpoints.
  • Conversely, the Rogerian strateg y presents a balanced examination of conflicting perspectives on an issue, methodically evaluating the merits and demerits of each before arriving at a reasoned conclusion.
I. Introduction Hook, Background, Thesis Statement Introduce your topic by offering your readers the freedom to decide on what their thoughts are. State the main argument and don’t be biased in this section.
II. Body Paragraphs Argument Presentation, Rebuttal, Additional Evidence Introduce and support the main argument, refute counterarguments, and provide additional supporting evidence. Provide analytical information and offer some data that will help structure your argumentation.
III. Conclusion Restate Thesis, Summarize, Closing Remarks Restate your thesis and offer a summary of your key ideas and thoughts.
IV. Works Cited List and format all cited sources alphabetically, adhering to the citation style.

By consolidating the process into these five fundamental steps, you can create a solid framework to effectively guide your argumentative essay writing. Viewing free examples of argumentative essays might provide practical insights into applying these steps effectively.

For instance, examining an example of an argumentative essay on a contentious issue like “The Impact of Social Media on Society” can showcase how to balance persuasive argumentation with factual evidence, demonstrating the art of convincing the reader through a well-structured argument. Such examples serve not only as a template for formatting and style but also offer strategic insights into the nuanced process of engaging and persuading an audience, illustrating the power of a well-crafted argument. Through diligent practice and studying examples, students can enhance their ability to communicate complex ideas persuasively and coherently.

Introduction Example

“In the digital age, social media platforms have become central to our daily lives. However, while they connect us across the globe, they also raise significant privacy concerns. This essay argues that social media companies should be held to higher standards of data protection to safeguard user privacy.”

Why this introduction works: It immediately presents a relevant and controversial topic, hooks the reader with the issue of privacy, and clearly states the thesis that advocates for stricter data protection measures.

How it could be improved: To enhance it, the introduction could include a brief mention of opposing viewpoints or more specific examples of privacy breaches to further ground the argument.

Body Paragraph Example

“One of the primary concerns with social media is the way personal information is collected and used without explicit consent. For instance, a study by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse found that 80% of social media sites sell user data to third parties. This practice not only breaches individual privacy but also exposes users to targeted advertising and potential fraud.”

Why this body paragraph works: It focuses on a single, clear point supporting the thesis, uses concrete evidence (a study) to back up the claim, and explains the significance of the evidence.

How it could be improved: This paragraph could be strengthened by addressing a counterargument, such as the economic benefits of targeted advertising for businesses and users, and then rebutting it to reinforce the original argument.

Conclusion Example

“In conclusion, the unchecked collection and use of personal data by social media companies pose a significant threat to user privacy. This essay has demonstrated the need for stricter data protection regulations to ensure that individuals retain control over their personal information. As digital citizens, it is imperative that we demand transparency and accountability from these platforms.”

Why this conclusion works: It effectively summarizes the essay’s main points, restates the thesis in light of the arguments made, and ends with a powerful call to action that encourages reader engagement.

How it could be improved: The conclusion could offer a broader perspective, suggesting ways in which individuals can protect their privacy or how these issues reflect larger societal concerns about digital rights and freedoms.

Example of Argumentative Essay Thesis Statement

A thesis statement in an argumentative essay serves as the essay’s backbone , articulating the central argument or claim that the entire essay will support and defend. It’s a roadmap for the reader, indicating what to expect in the essay and presenting the writer’s stance on the issue. A well-crafted thesis statement should be clear, concise, and debatable, offering a specific perspective that can be argued against.

Example Thesis Statement

Why This Works:

  • Clarity and Precision: The thesis clearly states the writer’s position that, despite some positive aspects, social media has significant negative impacts.
  • Debatable: This statement invites counterarguments, as some may argue that the benefits of social media outweigh the negatives or that regulation could infringe on free speech.
  • Scope for Argumentation: It outlines specific areas (privacy, mental health, democratic discourse) that the essay will explore, providing a clear direction for the argument.

How It Could Be Improved:

While the example thesis is strong, it could further specify the nature of the “comprehensive regulation” proposed, making the essay’s direction even clearer to the reader. For instance, specifying types of regulation or areas of focus (e.g., data protection, age restrictions) would offer a more precise roadmap for the argument.

Tips for Writing a Good Argumentative Essay

Writing a good argumentative essay requires careful planning, organization, and persuasive writing skills. Here are the top three tips to help you craft an effective argumentative essay:

#1: Choose a Clear and Controversial Topic

Select a topic that you are passionate about and that has two or more opposing sides. A strong argumentative essay presents a clear and debatable thesis statement. Avoid topics that are overly broad or have already been settled conclusively.

#2: Develop a Strong Thesis Statement

Your thesis statement is the core of your argumentative essay. It should clearly state your position on the topic and provide a concise preview of the main points you will use to support your argument. Make sure your thesis is specific, arguable, and focused.

#3: Provide Strong Evidence and Logical Reasoning

   – To persuade your readers, you need to provide compelling evidence and sound reasoning to support your thesis. Use a variety of reputable sources such as academic articles, books, statistics, and expert opinions. Cite your sources properly and use them to back up your claims.

   – Organize your essay logically with a clear introduction, body paragraphs that each focus on a single supporting point, and a conclusion that summarizes your main arguments and reiterates your thesis.

   – Address counterarguments and rebut them effectively. Anticipating and responding to opposing viewpoints demonstrates that you have considered all perspectives on the issue and strengthens your argument.

#4: Bonus Tip

Revise and Edit Carefully: after completing your essay, take the time to revise and edit it. Check for clarity, coherence, grammar, and spelling errors. Ensure that your essay flows smoothly and that your arguments are well-structured. Consider seeking feedback from peers or instructors to get different perspectives on your essay’s strengths and weaknesses.

By following these tips and presenting a well-reasoned argument supported by credible evidence, you’ll be well on your way to writing a compelling argumentative essay.

Before delving into argumentative essay samples , take a moment to familiarize yourself with the infographic summarizing tips for essay writing.

Writing Tips for Argumentative Essay

Good Argumentative Essay Examples

Crafting compelling argumentative essays is an essential aspect of academic pursuits. To excel in this endeavor, gaining insights from good argumentative essay examples becomes imperative. Evaluating the quality of such examples is crucial to discern their usefulness. Key factors to consider include adherence to a specific essay model, the presence of a well-structured introductory paragraph, organized body sections, and a formal, impactful conclusion. 

These examples serve as invaluable guides, aiding students in mastering the art of persuasive writing and enhancing their academic performance. Explore these examples to elevate your essay-writing prowess and excel in the realm of argumentative discourse.

Argument Essay Examples for College

When crafting college-level essays, it’s advisable to employ straightforward language, steering clear of unnecessary complexity. The key lies in presenting a compelling argument essay that combines simplicity with robust evidence to bolster your claims. To enhance your writing skills, take a moment to explore argument essay examples thoughtfully. Pay attention not only to their formatting but also to the vocabulary employed. You can check these in the “Should College Be Free” argumentative essay example or read these argument essay examples can serve as invaluable resources, offering insights into effective persuasive techniques. By studying them, you can sharpen your own writing prowess and create essays that resonate convincingly with your audience.

Best Argumentative Essay Samples for High School

Explore the best argumentative essay examples tailored for high school students. These exemplary essays serve as invaluable resources, showcasing effective persuasive techniques and providing inspiration for your own writing endeavors. Elevate your argumentative essay skills and excel in high school academics with these illuminating examples.

Free Argumentative Essay Examples for Middle School

As a middle school student, delving into the world of argumentative essays may seem daunting. You might be pondering how to construct a compelling argument and provide adequate support for your viewpoint. To demystify the process and empower you with valuable insights, we’ve curated a collection of argument essay examples. These free argumentative essay examples serve as practical guides, illuminating the path to crafting effective essays. By examining these examples, you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the art of persuasive writing, making the task of creating your argumentative essay a more manageable and successful endeavor.

5-Paragraph Argumentative Essay Examples Free

Explore our curated collection of 5-paragraph argumentative essay examples. These exemplars provide a clear and structured framework for crafting compelling arguments. Each example guides you through the introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs presenting evidence and counterarguments, and a conclusive summary. Whether you’re a student or an aspiring writer, these examples offer valuable insights into building persuasive essays with a well-defined structure. Dive into these samples to sharpen your argumentative writing skills and master the art of persuasion.

7th Grade Argumentative Essay Examples

These samples are tailored to the needs and understanding of 7th graders, providing them with clear and relatable examples of persuasive writing. These examples serve as valuable resources to help you grasp the fundamentals of constructing compelling arguments and honing your persuasive writing skills. Explore these 7th-grade argumentative essay examples to embark on your journey toward effective argumentation and critical thinking.

Short Argumentative Essay Samples

When it comes to argumentative essays, there’s no fixed word count limitation. The primary objective is to persuade and effectively convey the writer’s insights to the intended audience. An argumentative essay can be concise or extensive, yet its validity hinges on the strength of its argument. Here, we present a brief example of argumentative essay sample to illustrate how even a short composition can powerfully convey ideas and viewpoints. Whether you opt for brevity or depth, the essence of a compelling argument remains constant, making your case convincing.

Argumentative Essay Writing Checklist

  • ✔️ Study your topic first. If you want to come up with a reliable argumentation, you should know all the cons and pros of your subject.
  • ✔️ Narrow your topic down to provide a clear argumentation that would not be too vague.
  • ✔️ Create a hook sentence in your introduction that will help make sense of your subject. It should be something that will inspire your readers and make them interested in your problem’s scope.
  • ✔️ Create a strong thesis statement.
  • ✔️ Research your statistics and data that will help act as evidence. If you can provide more information based on interviews, surveys, statistics, or first-hand research, you will be able to support your arguments with the help of the primary sources.
  • ✔️ Check your quotes to avoid plagiarism as you create an accurate reference list.

Make sure that you check your grading rubric twice and study at least one free example of argumentative essay. It will help you compare the provided rules to your argumentative task as you begin to write.

Summary: Example Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays are a prevalent form of academic writing that combines persuasive arguments with research-based evidence to sway readers’ viewpoints. These essays seek to convince readers to adopt a particular perspective on a controversial issue by presenting a clear thesis, supporting it with evidence, and refuting opposing arguments. They are valuable tools for honing persuasive writing skills and critical thinking.

Our collection of argumentative essay examples covers various educational levels, from college to middle school, and different essay structures, including 5-paragraph and short essays. These samples provide practical insights into constructing compelling arguments, organizing essays effectively, and using evidence to support claims. They serve as valuable resources for students and writers looking to improve their argumentative essay writing skills. 

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Amigo Brothers: An Argumentative Sample

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Introduction The National Football League (NFL) stands as a monumental entity within the realm of American sports, captivating millions of fans with its high-octane games and charismatic players. However, along with its immense popularity comes a litany of controversies that challenge the ethical framework within…

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The Minimum Wage Debate: Balancing Economic Growth and Social Equity

Introduction The debate over the minimum wage is one of the most enduring and contentious in economic policy. Proponents argue that raising the minimum wage is essential for reducing poverty and ensuring a fairer distribution of income, while opponents contend that it could lead to…

Video Game Addiction: A Growing Threat to Health and Society

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The Role Of Hate Speech In Social Media

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What is an argumentative essay type?

An argumentative essay is a type of essay that aims to persuade the reader to accept a particular point of view. It presents evidence and arguments to support the writer's claim and to refute opposing views.

How do you start an argumentative essay?

The most important part of starting a successful argumentative essay is coming up with a good topic, thesis sentence statement, and a list of sources that will support your argumentation. These three elements are essential because they represent the core of your argumentative writing. Check our free argumentative essay examples to see how the argumentation in the thesis is supported by the evidence and citations. Do not ignore the introduction part with the sentences that set the topic for your essay. They must be present to let the readers know why your argumentative part takes place.

What are things to avoid when writing an argumentative essay?

The trick is to avoid choosing argumentative essay titles that remain between two opinions. Once you have a good argument, it must take a side, yet never sound too opinionated. If you say something, provide evidence. Seek for argumentative essay topics that can influence your readers but avoid controversial ideas. Composing your thesis statement, start with a list of sources.

What are the different types of argumentative essays?

There are three main types of argumentative essays: Toulmin argument (focuses on the relationship between claims, evidence, and warrants), Rogerian argument (aims to find common ground with the reader and to build consensus; acknowledges opposing views and tries to show that the writer's position is compatible with them) and Classical argument (follows a three-part structure: introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion).

What are the 5 parts of an argumentative essay?

Since there are different meanings to the five parts used in examples of argumentative essays, it must be said that the structure part must include "Introduction - Thesis - Main Body Part - Counter-Arguments Paragraph - Conclusion". In terms of five elements of a good argument, it must include Pathos, Target Audience, Speaker's Voice, Ethos, Message, and Logos. Following this structure, you will be able to get rid of all the unnecessary parts and avoid including your thoughts where they are not meant to be. You can see our argumentative samples as the reference of structure.

Can I use first-person pronouns in an argumentative essay?

The standards of academic writing do not recommend using the first person since an argumentative essay belongs to research writing where the focus is on the argument you make, not your personality. It is not a reflection essay as well. The target audience knows that you are the author. Still, you present argumentation based on research done by the others as the evidence, therefore, consider this fact. See our free argumentative essays to see how the grammar structures help to avoid “I” or “in my opinion” parts by using general descriptive patterns when referencing certain ideas.

What words or phrases create effective transitions in an argumentative essay?

Effective transitions in an argumentative essay can be achieved using words and phrases like "however," "contrary to popular belief," and "as confirmed by." These help in guiding the reader through your argument smoothly. To see how they work in practice, reviewing argumentative essay examples can be quite useful.

The most popular topics for Argumentative Essay

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  • Social Media
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20+ Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School to Get Started

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by  Antony W

June 9, 2024

argumentative essay topics for middle school

An argumentative essay for middle school focuses on issues surrounding students in primary and secondary schools. And given that there are numerous topics to cover within this scope, it’s important to focus on an area you can fully explore.

To be clear, choosing the best topic to argue is the first step to writing an argumentative essay of this nature. Get the topic wrong and your essay won’t read any different from what other students hand in for review.

We’ve put together as a list of interesting topics about middle school from which you can choose an argument to explore in your essay.

Key Takeaways

  • There are hundreds of topics to choose, but you only have to choose what you’d find interesting to explore.
  • Preliminary research can help you to determine whether you can construct a solid argument around a topic of choice. 
  • This post includes a handful of ideas for middle school argumentative essays. You can pick a topic you find interesting and explore it further in your writing.

20+ Middle School Argumentative Essay Topics

Once you identify a suitable topic from the following list, it should be easy for you to write your argument from start to finish.

Social Essay Topics for Middle School

  • Should Internet access be a basic human right in middle school?
  • Is affirmative action an effective way to address historical and ongoing discrimination against minorities?
  • Are girls or boys more subject to gender stereotypes?
  • Should schools be legally required to take more action to prevent bullying, and what are the most effective strategies?
  • Should the governments have the legal right to monitor individuals for national security purposes?
  • Should official forms and documents provide more options than just “male” and “female” when asking about gender?
  • Should religion be a factor in political decision-making, and if so, to what extent?
  • To what extent should schools be responsible for accommodating students with food allergies, and what policies are most effective for doing so?

Education Topics for Middle School

  • Students should choose their own courses and educational paths regardless of their academic performance in medical school. 
  • Is the Common Core curriculum effective in achieving its goals?
  • Arts education should have equal weight with other subjects in the curriculum
  • Should students be required to learn a second language in school?

Get an argumentative essay centered on middle school topics written for you. Place your order here , get up to 15% discount, and benefit from the convenience of our custom writing.

Media and Entertainment Essay Topics

  • To what extent does reality TV accurately depict real life, and how does this affect viewers’ perceptions of the world?
  • Is pop culture a valuable aspect of society, or does it contribute to harmful societal trends?
  • Should parents have the right to monitor their children’s Internet and social media usage?
  • The government should ban Photoshopped magazine covers banned and set criteria for determining what constitutes an unacceptable level of manipulation.
  • Do celebrities forfeit their right to privacy by choosing to live in the public eye?

Health and Wellness Essay Topics

  • To what extent do Americans have a healthy diet, and what are the consequences of unhealthy eating habits for individuals and society as a whole?
  • Are participation trophies a valuable way to boost children’s self-esteem or do they undermine the importance of achievement?
  • To what extent should children’s screen time be restricted, and what are the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches to limiting it?
  • Should the government outlaw cigarettes, and what are the potential consequences and challenges of doing so?

Our argument writers are only a click away to help you get the best paper for middle school written and delivered on time. Get in touch with us and benefit from the convenience of custom writing.

Middle School Essay Topics on Environment

  • What actions can households take to conserve energy, and how can governments encourage and support these efforts?
  • Is climate change real and caused by human activity, and what policies are most effective in mitigating its effects?

Ethics and Morality

  • Do violent video games make people more likely to be violent in real life?
  • Does nature or nurture play a bigger role in who we are?
  • Is it immoral to download copyrighted content illegally—or is it something that is a violation of the law, but not an issue of ethics?
  • Do athletes, celebrities, and CEOs deserve to make more money than the average person does?

General Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

  • Do anti-discrimination laws help or harm our society?
  • Should the government increase efforts to combat human trafficking?
  • Should illegal immigrants have the same rights as nationalized citizens?
  • Is America ready for a female president? Explain your opinion.
  • Is it ethical to keep wild animals as pets if the owner can care for them properly?
  • Do you support physician-assisted suicide in the case of terminal illness?
  • What is the appropriate age for children to begin using social media?
  • Should high school seniors be required to take a civics exam before graduating?
  • Should the government enforce stricter gun control policies?
  • Does the government promote hate or love when addressing racism?
  • Should employers require a Covid-19 vaccine for their employees?
  • Do electronic voting machines make the election process fair or unfair?
  • Should politicians have term limits?
  • Is climate change a problem that we can solve, or is it too large for us to manage?
  • Should churches continue to be exempt from paying taxes due to the separation of church and state?
  • Has artificial intelligence gone too far? Explain your opinion.
  • Should public education at the college level be free of tuition?
  • Should the government have the power to determine which books are allowed in classrooms?

About the author 

Antony W is a professional writer and coach at Help for Assessment. He spends countless hours every day researching and writing great content filled with expert advice on how to write engaging essays, research papers, and assignments.

Argumentative Essay Writing

Argumentative Essay Examples

Cathy A.

Best Argumentative Essay Examples for Your Help

Published on: Mar 10, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 30, 2024

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Argumentative essays are one of the most common types of essay writing. Students are assigned to write such essays very frequently.

Despite being assigned so frequently, students still find it hard to write a good argumentative essay .

There are certain things that one needs to follow to write a good argumentative essay. The first thing is to choose an effective and interesting topic. Use all possible sources to dig out the best topic.

Afterward, the student should choose the model that they would follow to write this type of essay. Follow the steps of the chosen model and start writing the essay.

The models for writing an argumentative essay are the classical model, the Rogerian model, and the Toulmin model.

To make sure that you write a good argumentative essay, read the different types of examples mentioned in this blog.

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Good Argumentative Essay Examples

Argumentative essays are an inevitable part of academic life. To write a good argumentative essay, you need to see a few good examples of this type of essay.

To analyze whether the example is good to take help from or not. You need to look for a few things in it.

Make sure it follows one specific model and has an introductory paragraph, organized body paragraphs, and a formal conclusion.

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How to Start an Argumentative Essay Example

Learning how to start an argumentative essay example is a tricky thing for beginners. It is quite simple but can be challenging for newbies.   To start an argumentative essay example, you need to write a brief and attractive introduction. It is written to convince the reader and make them understand your point of view .

Add body paragraphs after the introduction to support your thesis statement. Also, use body paragraphs to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of your side of the argument.

Write a formal conclusion for your essay and summarize all the key elements of your essay. Look at the example mentioned below to understand the concept more clearly.

Check out this video for more information!

Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Example 

Argumentative essays are assigned to university students more often than the students of schools and colleges.

 It involves arguments over vast and sometimes bold topics as well.

For university students, usually, argumentative essay topics are not provided. They are required to search for the topic themselves and write accordingly.

The following examples will give an idea of how university students write argumentative essays.

Argumentative Essay Example for University (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for College

For the college level, it is recommended to use simple language and avoid the use of complex words in essays.

Make sure that using simple language and valid evidence, you support your claim well and make it as convincing as possible

If you are a college student and want to write an argumentative essay, read the examples provided below. Focus on the formatting and the vocabulary used.

Argumentative Essay Example for College (PDF)

College Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for Middle School

Being a middle school student, you must be wondering how we write an argumentative essay. And how can you support your argument?

Go through the following examples and hopefully, you will be able to write an effective argumentative essay very easily.

Argumentative Essay Example for Middle School(PDF)

Middle School Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for High School

High school students are not very aware of all the skills that are needed to write research papers and essays. 

Especially, when it comes to argumentative essays, it becomes quite a challenge for high schools to defend their argument

In this scenario, the best option is to look into some good examples. Here we have summed up two best examples of argumentative essays for high school students specifically.

Argumentative Essay Example for High School (PDF)

High School Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for O Level

The course outline for O levels is quite tough. O levels students need to have a good command of the English language and amazing writing skills.

If you are an O-level student, the following examples will guide you on how to write an argumentative essay.

Argumentative Essay Example for O Level (PDF)

Argumentative Essay for O Level Students (PDF)

5-Paragraph Argumentative Essay Examples

A 5-paragraph essay is basically a formatting style for essay writing. It has the following five parts:

  • Introduction

In the introduction, the writer introduces the topic and provides a glance at the collected data to support the main argument.

  • Body paragraph 1

The first body paragraph discusses the first and most important point related to the argument. It starts with a topic sentence and has all the factual data to make the argument convincing.

  • Body paragraph 2

The second body paragraph mentions the second most important element of the argument. A topic sentence is used to start these paragraphs. It gives the idea of the point that will discuss in the following paragraph.

  • Body paragraph 3

The third paragraph discusses all the miscellaneous points. Also, it uses a transitional sentence at the end to show a relation to the conclusion.

The conclusion of a five-paragraph essay reiterates all the major elements of an argumentative essay. It also restates the thesis statement using a more convincing choice of words.

Look at the example below to see how a well-written five-paragraph essay looks like

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for 6th Grade

Students in 6th grade are at a point where they are learning new things every day. 

Writing an argumentative essay is an interesting activity for them as they like to convince people of their point of view.

Argumentative essays written at such levels are very simple but well convincing. 

The following example will give you more detail on how a 6th-grade student should write an argumentative essay.

6th Grade Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for 7th Grade

There is not much difference between a 6th-grade and a 7th-grade student. Both of them are enhancing their writing and academic skills.

Here is another example to help you with writing an effective argumentative essay.

7th Grade Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Tough Essay Due? Hire a Writer!

Tough Essay Due? Hire a Writer!

Short Argumentative Essay Examples

For an argumentative essay, there is no specific limit for the word count. It only has to convince the readers and pass on the knowledge of the writer to the intended audience.

It can be short or detailed. It would be considered valid as far as it has an argument involved in it.

Following is an example of a short argumentative essay example

Short Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Immigration Argumentative Essay Examples

Immigration is a hot topic for a very long time now. People have different opinions regarding this issue.

Where there is more than one opinion, an argumentative essay can be written on that topic. The following are examples of argumentative essays on immigration.

Read them and try to understand how an effective argumentative essay is written on such a topic.

Argumentative Essay Example on Immigration (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Sample on Immigration (PDF)

Writing essays is usually a tiring and time-consuming assignment to do. Students already have a bunch of assignments for other subjects to complete. In this situation, asking for help from professional writers is the best choice.

If you are still in need of assistance, our essay writer AI can help you create a compelling essay that presents your argument clearly and effectively. 

With our argumentative essay writing service, you will enjoy perks like expert guidance, unlimited revisions, and helpful customer support. Let our essay writer help you make an impact with your essay on global warming today! 

Place your order with our college essay writing service today!

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the 7 types of arguments.

The seven types of arguments are as follows:

  • Statistical

What is the structure of an argument?

The structure of an argument consists of a main point (thesis statement) that is supported by evidence. 

This evidence can include facts, statistics, examples, and other forms of data that help to prove or disprove the thesis statement. 

After providing the evidence, arguments also often include a conclusion that summarizes the main points made throughout the argument.

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argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Bell Ringers

3 types of essays your middle schoolers need to practice.

Writing can be a real headache for ELA teachers. Writing is layered with skills – from grammar to analysis – so it’s not a walk in the park for teachers or students. It’s really common for students to struggle to apply what they’ve learned, think deeply and critically, and write independently. There are several types of essays that middle schoolers need to learn, but if the thought of teaching them makes you want to run for the hills, stick with me. We’re going to talk about three different types of essays middle schoolers need to practice, and I’ll share some resources to help you out.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Types of Essays for Middle Schoolers

There are various types of essays out there, but there are three types I want to specifically look at: argumentative, literary analysis, and narrative. These types of essays cover both creative and critical thinking – and help push literary skills to the next level.

Argumentative Writing

Writing argumentative essays requires that students know how to defend a stance. Students are great at taking stances, but defending them requires deeper thinking.

When writing an argumentative essay, there are a few key things students need to know. To start, students need to be able to select a topic and take a position on that topic (or they can take a position on a topic assigned to them). Students will also brainstorm a list of logical reasons to support their stance, use clear and convincing evidence to support their points, and share counterclaims. 

Of course, that’s where things get tricky. Students really struggle to build solid arguments and find great evidence. Inside the Argumentative Writing Booklet, I included information about credible sources, logical reasonings, and relevant evidence. I referred to these a lot when in the classroom, and it’s likely you’ll need to teach them over (and then over again).

Another important part of an argumentative essay is counterclaims. This requires that students step into someone else’s shoes and think about how someone could break down their stance. Inside the Argumentative Writing Booklet, I included some key points for students to remember about counterclaims and sentence starters to help with essay writing.

If you are looking for a resource to make the process of teaching students to write argumentative essays a total breeze, check out my free Argumentative Student Reference Booklet! Inside, you’ll find reference pages for –

❤️ how to craft an argument

❤️ the elements of writing an argumentative essay

❤️ writing a counterclaim

❤️ the types of credible sources

❤️ how to ensure you are using logical reasons

❤️ and more!

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Literary Analysis

Another important skill for middle schoolers is learning how to write a literary analysis essay . Literary analysis goes much deeper than just a simple summary. In fact, when writing a literary analysis essay, students can make an argument, dig deep into specific literary elements, or explore a theory they have about the text. 

In order to know how to write a literary analysis essay, students need to know how to analyze a text and find evidence to support their analysis. (I know, it’s easier said than done.) For example, students might notice a frequent symbol or craft that the author uses and decide to explore what it means or its purpose. Inside the Literary Analysis Booklet, I included pages on symbolism and author’s craft as a jumping-off point for students to brainstorm and analyze.

Another area I’ve seen students struggle with is the thesis statement. Because students often want to write literary analysis like a summary, they get stuck here. In the Literary Analysis Booklet, I give examples of thesis statements, along with a thesis formula and mistakes to avoid.

If the thought of teaching how to write a literary analysis essay is overwhelming to you, check out the Literary Analysis freebie! Inside, you’ll find –

❤️ summarizing vs. analyzing

❤️ literary analysis elements

❤️ how to annotate literature

❤️ in-depth overview of author’s craft

❤️ thesis statement guide

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

Narrative Writing

The final type of essay I want to focus on is narrative writing . Learning to write narrative essays is the way that students become really comfortable with their own storytelling voice. Personal narratives are often some of the first writing exposure students have in elementary school. As students get older, it’s tossed to the side for more analytical writing. Narrative essays provide the perfect opportunity for students to practice skills like adding details, vocabulary, and imagery. It allows them to give a touch of their personality and imagination.

One big perk to narrative writing is that you’ll have tons of examples to pull from. You can easily slip it alongside your reading unit. Students can use a book club or whole class text as an example of narrative writing – and then try to create their own.

My favorite part of narrative writing is that it reinforces what students have learned in their reading units. They will have to understand the plot and how a plot unfolds. This also involves students dipping into author’s craft by choosing a point of view, using figurative language, and developing character motives. It also means creating believable characters and dialogue. It can be tougher than it might first appear!

In my Narrative Writing Reference Booklet freebie, I’ve included all the foundation information students would need + examples of narrative essays for students to refer to. Inside the freebie, you’ll find –

❤️ elements of narrative writing

❤️ developing the plot of narrative writing

❤️ sensory details + examples

❤️ how to use dialogue

❤️ ways to start and end narrative writing + examples

I know that essay writing can be a head-banging experience (for both you and your students). My hope is that with the Writing Toolkit, you can make it easier for students to write independently and build a strong foundation for writing.

  • Read more about: Middle School Writing

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Using Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Middle School ELA

Using Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Middle School ELA

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argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

75 Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School

At some points in middle school, schoolchildren will be made to write essays to prove points and convince their readers. These essays, called persuasive essays, help the students become decisive and to stand by their choices. They also help build the charisma and morale needed to convince other people of their choices.

An example of such is the persuasive essay rubric middle school students are made or encouraged to write.

Persuasive Essay Prompts Middle School Students Will Find Helpful

Choosing the right persuasive essay topic is as important as writing a good essay. This is because right from the topic you choose, you must be able to convince your readers to pick up your essay and read till the end. This article provides 75 persuasive essay topics for middle school students or persuasive essay ideas for middle school students.

Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School

Below is a compilation of topics for persuasive essay rubric middle school and other middle school students can choose from:

  • Teenagers should be allowed to vote
  • Saving the Earth should be everybody’s business
  • Sign languages should be taught in all schools
  • Students should be allowed to pick their teachers
  • Students should be taught valuable manners in schools
  • The Child Right Act should be included in every school’s curriculum
  • Schools should not impose wearing uniforms on their students
  • Students should be made to wear uniforms
  • Adults should pay more attention to their children’s overall welfare
  • Pop culture has a negative effect on young people
  • Pop culture has a positive effect on young people
  • Students should be allowed to take personalised classes
  • Self defence classes should be mandatory for students
  • Middle school students should be taught how to defend themselves
  • Schools need to encourage their students to spend more time reading
  • Adults should take time to monitor their children’s progress in schools
  • Important values should be taught at home
  • No child should be forced to grow up
  • Parents must be ready to take responsibility for their children
  • Parents should learn to make investments for their children’s futures
  • Parents should teach their children good spending habits
  • Children should be taught to save money
  • Children under the age of 18 should not be made to work
  • Parents have to pay special attention to their children to make sure they are not being bullied
  • Schools need to take stricter measures against students that bully others
  • No child is too old to learn about avoiding strangers
  • People should be taught the best way to interact with special needs children
  • Both bullies and their parents should be made to face punishments
  • Students should be allowed to bring their pets to schools
  • Students should be taught relevant subjects in schools
  • Every child should be taught to speak at least one foreign language
  • Video games should be regarded as part of school curricular activities
  • Middle school students should be allowed to have cell phones
  • Students who bully others should be expelled
  • Holidays should be spent with loved ones
  • People should do more to help homeless people
  • Sharing is an important value to have
  • Body shaming is a form of bullying
  • Sex education should be compulsory
  • Cooking classes should be mandatory for students
  • Students should be taught ways to ensure their security
  • Children under the age of 18 should not be allowed to be babysitters
  • Students should be taught healthy lifestyles both at home and in schools
  • Parents should take out time to get to know their children better
  • Good communication skills should be taught in schools
  • Teenagers should be allowed to make political decisions
  • The government is hiding the truth about aliens
  • Children should be given free education
  • Every child should be allowed to take time off from school
  • Every school should teach their students proper etiquette
  • Ever child needs to know their home address and parents’ phone numbers
  • Junior school students should be made to take regular spelling tests
  • Pop quizzes should be encouraged
  • Students should be encouraged to form study groups
  • Schools need to implement proper hygiene practices
  • Parents should make sure their children practice proper hygiene
  • Schools need to make students involved in their future
  • Every child should learn a skill
  • Every child should know the basic rules of environmental protection
  • Schools should give students proper counseling
  • Student’s health should be taken seriously
  • Students should be taught good dietary practices
  • Sports keep students away from crimes
  • Schools need to allow indigenous attires
  • Having too much money can be bad
  • Rich people need to help poor people
  • The government needs to do more
  • Lockers are unnecessary
  • Every child should have a proper lunch
  • All teachers should be nice
  • Every child should have a reading corner
  • Children should be allowed to pick meals
  • Every child needs a home
  • Stability is important in a child’s life
  • Creativity should be encouraged

All these topics are good enough for you to write a convincing essay about, so pick whichever you feel comfortable with.

argumentative essay examples for middle schoolers

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The Endless Pursuit of Equality Through College Admissions

The new documentary “admissions granted” examines the different ways asian americans are impacted by the battles over affirmative action..

Gradient photo of Alex Nguyen, a fellow at Mother Jones

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Protesters outside the Supreme Court

Demonstrators protest outside of the Supreme Court in 2023, after the justices struck down affirmative action in college admissions. Jose Luis Magana/AP

Admissions Granted , a documentary set to premiere on MSNBC on Sunday at 9 pm ET, gets at a central question about equality in the United States. “Everyone is treated the same, or equality demands that people be treated differently in order to produce the equality,” Jeannie Suk Gersen, a Harvard law professor, says in the film. “This has been there since the beginning of the country and was there at the inception of the Fourteenth Amendment. And it’s one that is unresolved.” 

The documentary probes this idea by tracking the progress of a 2014 lawsuit alleging that Harvard’s race-conscious admissions program—which was intended to help underrepresented minorities—was illegal. Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), an anti-affirmative action legal nonprofit, simultaneously sued the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (my alma mater!), arguing that, as a public school, its admissions process breached the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

SFFA focused on the negative effect these affirmative action programs had on Asian American applicants, with the group positing that the two universities were racially discriminatory. As Harvard Magazine explained, SFFA found that Asian Americans consistently received the lowest score of any racial group on their “personal” rating, one of the five admissions categories, alongside academic, athletic, and extracurricular achievement, and an “overall” rating. Harvard dismissed the data analysis as “flawed” and stated that the personal rating helps provide a holistic understanding of who an applicant is and “considers race in accordance with Supreme Court precedent.” Both lawsuits went through the court system, eventually landing at the Supreme Court. 

The film follows several subjects from both sides of the Harvard case, with SFFA founder and conservative activist Edward Blum and organizations like the Asian American Coalition for Education facing off against proponents of affirmative action—and Asian American students and their families divided in between.

This wasn’t the first battle over affirmative action. Admissions Granted chronicles the long history of conservative efforts to roll back these programs, including prior court decisions like Regents of the University of California v. Bakke in 1978, which struck down racial quotas, and Grutter v. Bollinger in 2003, which permitted schools to use affirmative action for campus diversity as long as race was only one factor considered among many. 

The crux of these cases was an argument over what discrimination really means in the United States. What should be allowed under federal law and the US Constitution? In its 2023 ruling on the Harvard and UNC cases, the Supreme Court declared the schools’ admissions systems to be unlawful. “Eliminating racial discrimination means eliminating all of it…For ‘the guarantee of equal protection cannot mean one thing when applied to one individual and something else when applied to a person of another color,’” the court stated , quoting from Bakke.

In her dissent , Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson rejected that argument. “Our country has never been colorblind,” she wrote. “Given the lengthy history of state-sponsored race-based preferences in America, to say that anyone is now victimized if a college considers whether that legacy of discrimination has unequally advantaged its applicants fails to acknowledge the well-documented ‘intergenerational transmission of inequality’ that still plagues our citizenry.”

Amidst all of this, where do Asian Americans lie? The film documents claims that they have been used as the face of the decades-long conservative backlash against affirmative action. Beginning in 1961, with President John F. Kennedy’s Executive Order 10925 , the US government began taking halting steps toward a vision of equality in an imagined racially binary society. Over the decades, that vision would lead to countless debates, political battles, and legal challenges over what fairness and equality really mean. 

One year after the Supreme Court’s Harvard ruling, I spoke with Hao Wu and Miao Wang, the directors of Admissions Granted , to better understand the case, the affirmative action debate that it brought once again to the national stage, and what can still be done to address systemic racism in higher education. Our interview has been edited for clarity.

One subject in the documentary, Sally Chen, recalled her counselor telling her to not write an Asian immigrant story for her college essay, saying it was overdone and not compelling. So to reject that advice, I was wondering about both of your stories coming and working in the US.

Wang: I came to the US when I was around 12, and I didn’t speak English when I arrived in the Boston area. When Jeannie [Suk Gersen], who is in the film, talked about her experience, I really related to her because we moved around the same time and same age, sitting in the classroom not knowing what was going on. I started at the end of seventh grade and then went on to eighth grade and high school. Those were my years in Boston, feeling very alienated from everything. In my high school it was pretty much mostly white, and I think I was the only Asian person in the school. 

Then I went to college, but I didn’t study film. I went to Chicago and studied economics. A lot of that also has to do with feeling the family pressure of studying something creative. But I moved to New York as soon as I graduated and started to slowly work on more creative projects. I attended Parsons [School of Design] for an interactive media program. That’s where I started doing more film. My first film [“Yellow Ox Mountain”] looked at Chinese artists in New York—that was my thesis project that I turned into a real film and submitted to film festivals. 

It’s interesting as an Asian American filmmaker. I think my own relationship to being Asian American has changed since I’ve now been here for a long time. It took me a while to feel at all comfortable identifying as an Asian American because I felt more like Chinese and an American. And I still feel like I’m that—more than Asian American—but I’ve gotten more comfortable with that terminology over the years.

Wu: I came to the US at the age of 20. I went to college in China and went through the college entrance exam system—as mentioned in the film—where a single score determines where you end up. I came over here studying molecular biology, and then later I switched to business. I got my MBA at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. I actually went to work in the tech industry for many years and made films on the side as a hobby, but 12 years ago, I quit my tech corporate job and started doing filmmaking full-time. 

As Miao mentioned, I definitely felt more Chinese and American, by culture, instead of Asian American. But having lived here for a long time, especially after I had my own kids and watched them grow up in America as Chinese Americans—or Asian Americans—and also having made this film about the American experience, has helped me start to identify as Asian American. But I absolutely understand many Asian Americans have a very different upbringing than my own experience growing up in China.

What drew both of you to the Harvard case? What inspired you to make a film about it?

Wang: It was at a big film party that was overflowing with food and drinks during a long conversation while both of us were reading about the lawsuit and when the case had just gone through its district court ruling in late 2019. Both of us felt like it was a fraught conversation in the news. There’s so much nuance around it like the two sides of Asian Americans that were involved in the case and how affirmative action was part of the discrimination litigation. There were a lot of different things to unpack, and I think we got interested.

Wu: Because I came here initially for graduate school, a lot of my friends from China had a similar experience to Yukong [Zhao] and Jeff [Wang], the parents in the film. Around the Harvard lawsuit, starting in 2018, I started hearing a lot more and became more conscious about my friends talking about their perception of how difficult it was for Chinese American or Asian American kids to get into college. That definitely piqued my interest, and then once I started reading about this lawsuit, as Miao mentioned, there was confusion about what this has to do with affirmative action. After having talked at the party, we both felt like we were really interested. First of all, we wanted to find out more, but we were not sure whether there was a film. A lot of times when filmmakers get together, we encourage each other to go along with the project, so that’s what we did. We just decided to work on this together, to be able to discuss, and also motivate each other to go on.

Based on what you were saying, Hao, how did your perspective on Asian Americans’ place in that whole affirmative action discourse in media and in politics change throughout the filmmaking process?

Wu: Throughout the filmmaking process, both Miao and I read a lot of books about Asian American history. For example, early Chinese Americans building the railroad, the San Francisco riot against Chinese Americans, and Japanese internment camps. We read about the different groups coming to America, and that expanded my understanding of what the Asian American identity truly encompasses. Previously, based on what I read in the media, there seemed to be a very monolithic view about what Asian American identity represents, but through the making of this film, I started realizing that there was not only ethnic and cultural diversity within the Asian American community, but also their political views are quite diverse. That’s refreshing for me. 

Wang: One of the things that I found interesting is when many Asian immigrants come to the US, they don’t really understand why they are suddenly now under this Asian American umbrella. Where did that come from? And I feel like not knowing that history—which I didn’t really know until more recently—of why early immigrants decided to come together and become “Asian American” would make it seem like somebody else put that umbrella together to make you more monolithic. But I read that it was actually political alliances that came together to create more power for the group. So instead of just one group, each fighting for their own rights, they were actually coming together for empowerment.

Wu: What was really helpful for me to understand why there’s so much diversity in Asian Americans’ views on affirmative action is the concept of cultural repertoire from Natasha Warikoo, who is in the film. Newly arrived immigrants, on one hand, don’t fully understand the history of Asian Americans and their involvement in the civil rights movement, and they also came here with their own cultural repertoire—how what made them successful in their own life experience shaped their views and expectation for their kids, as well as their political views.

Yeah, watching this documentary led me to research the history of the term “Asian American.” I read how during the ’60s it originated from student activists at UC Berkeley as something political and tied to the civil rights movement but has evolved more into a demographic descriptor today.

Wang: Exactly, that’s what I was talking about. It’s so interesting to learn that history.

In the documentary, Natasha Warikoo discussed the evolving language we were using after the Bakke ruling in addressing systemic racism and discrimination. Instead of using ideas like “equality,” “justice,” and “access,” we were now talking about multiculturalism and diversity. What do you think about that change in language?

Wu: That’s tied to the legal argument. The original rationale to why American society started and popularized affirmative action was to try to remediate. But during the Bakke case, the first affirmative action lawsuit to the Supreme Court, the Court ruled that to remedy past discrimination is not a legally valid rationale for the existence of affirmative action. Justice [Lewis] Powell said universities have a compelling state interest to increase diversity, so that students can learn from each other. It was a legal compromise for the Supreme Court to be able to justify the continuation of affirmative action policies. At that time, it was viewed as a win for liberals.

Wang: It wasn’t a win for everybody. Some of the schools felt like they could continue their work, but there were civil rights activists in the beginning that were against it. 

Wu: It wasn’t necessarily fully beneficial to the longevity of affirmative action because in last year’s ruling, conservative justices really battered the diversity rationale. During the oral argument, they kept asking, “How do you measure the benefits of diversity?” 

The documentary touches on the idea of conservatives like Edward Blum using middle-class Asian Americans under the model minority myth to position communities of color against each other. What do you think is the way forward to ameliorate this?

Wang: Because universities now don’t have access to using race as a checkbox, they are trying to find alternative ways. Jeannie was talking at one of our panel interviews about how some of them are considering recruitment processes that look at different zip codes because a lot of times you can tell household makeup or even race and income. They’re using different factors that are not directly race for recruitment to achieve the same results.

Wu: The state of California banned affirmative action with Proposition 209. The University of California system has experimented with ways to give preferences to underrepresented minority groups using socioeconomic measures as well as geographic measures, as Miao mentioned. Also, the Supreme Court allowed college applicants to write about race as one of the factors that shaped their character or achievement to give admissions officers a more complete understanding of their background. That’s still allowed—the only thing that they cannot use is race as a checkbox. The ruling will definitely have some impact, but I think other universities are trying to do something similar to what the California system has been doing to get around the ban.

Wang: I’m sure it’s more work for the schools, and they’re going to have to experiment and do more research to find other ways that work.

Wu: But the concern now with conservatives like Edward Blum is that they are very critical of race considerations. So they’ll challenge whatever the elite colleges want to do.

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IMAGES

  1. Middle School Argumentative Essay Writing Ideas

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  3. Argumentative Essay for Students

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  4. FREE 19+ Argumentative Essay Samples & Templates in PDF, MS Word

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  6. 61 Great Argumentative Writing Prompts for Middle School

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COMMENTS

  1. Short Argumentative Essay Samples for Middle School

    The Significance of Argumentative Essays in Middle School. Argumentative essays serve as a powerful tool in the middle school curriculum for several reasons: Critical Thinking: Writing argumentative essays encourages students to think critically. They must evaluate evidence, analyze different perspectives, and form their own opinions.

  2. 33 Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

    Good Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas (and Free, too!) With these 33 new argumentative essay topics for middle school students, you can help your students learn more about what makes a good argument and how to evaluate and decipher so-called "evidence.". As they explore topics like the ways in which schools handle bullying and whether or not ...

  3. 100 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens. Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts. Writing a strong argumentative essay teaches students to make a case for their own point of view without relying on emotion or passion. These argumentative essay topics provide options for kids of all ages ...

  4. A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

    The Write Source Persuasive Writing Samples; Oregon Department of Education High School Scored Narrative and Argumentative Writing Samples; Holt, Rinehart, Winston Persuasive Essay Models; Reflective writing examples for middle school. Reflective essay examples from Lake Washington Girls Middle School; If you know of any other online writing ...

  5. PDF Argumentative Essay Writing A Step-by-Step Guide

    For an argument essay to be effective, you must organize your ideas, provide solid supporting evidence, and present the information clearly. Body Paragraph #1 This paragraph introduces the first reason that your claim is valid. Support it with evidence, such as facts, examples, and data. Body Paragraph #2

  6. 94 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School: Protocols, Health

    This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of ...

  7. 40 Persuasive Writing Examples (Essays, Speeches, and More)

    Harvey Milk's "The Hope" Speech. Sample lines: "Some people are satisfied. And some people are not. You see there is a major difference—and it remains a vital difference—between a friend and a gay person, a friend in office and a gay person in office. Gay people have been slandered nationwide.

  8. Teaching Argumentative Writing in Middle School ELA: Part One

    My done-for-you Argumentative Writing Unit scaffolds how to write an argumentative essay for you and your students. The unit includes 23 full lesson plans, slide presentations, notebook pages for students, teacher keys and examples, student references pages, and more for a well-rounded unit. Plus, this unit goes through the exact process I ...

  9. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    Argumentative Essay Example 2. Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through female Anopheles mosquitoes. Each year, over half a billion people will become infected with malaria, with roughly 80% of them living in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. How to Write an A+ Argumentative Essay

    An argumentative essay attempts to convince a reader to agree with a particular argument (the writer's thesis statement). The writer takes a firm stand one way or another on a topic and then uses hard evidence to support that stance. An argumentative essay seeks to prove to the reader that one argument —the writer's argument— is the ...

  11. 20 Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

    Engaging and relevant argumentative essay topics for students in upper elementary and middle school. This list of 20 argument writing prompts is appropriate for students in 5th - 8th grades. ... In an argument essay, research, evidence, and examples are used to convince the reader to consider a different point of view. A strong argument essay ...

  12. How To Increase Argumentative Essay Writing Scores

    To Increase Argumentative Essay Writing Scores. 1. Start with vocabulary for Argumentative Essays. We define words like cite, evidence, irrelevant, relevant, claim, opposing claim, and so on. We actually keep a notebook with these terms along with pictures to help us remember them.

  13. Argumentative Essay Examples & Samples That Worked

    Argumentative Essay Sample for High School. Below you can find an argumentative essay example for high school. This essay is written by a persuasive essay writer based on the literary work. Pay attention to how arguments are built and what evidence is used to prove the main position. Overcoming the Impact of Violence.

  14. Argumentative Essay

    Argumentative essay examples. Examples of argumentative essays vary depending upon the type: Academic essays differ based upon the topic and position. These essays follow a more traditional structure and are typically assigned in high school or college. Examples of academic argumentative essay topics include the following:

  15. The Top 34 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

    The argumentative essay lessons begin in middle school, when the young minds are ready to start defending ideas with logic and reason. Even though the classes talk about serious educational content, middle school students still love to have fun. For argumentative essays to be taken seriously, the topics need to be geared toward those young minds.

  16. 101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens. Use your words to sway the reader. Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life. Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative, but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader.

  17. Middle School Argumentative Topics: 20 Excellent Prompts

    20 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School. An argumentative essay is designed to explain to your reader information about one side of an argument. It is a lot like a persuasive essay because the idea is to explain one side of an issue but the idea is to present the facts without your opinion involved. ... For example, if you take the ...

  18. 10 Best Argumentative Essay Examples

    Argumentative Essay Examples For Kids. Example1: The Benefits of Online Learning in School. Online learning in school is a great idea because it offers many benefits. First, it allows students to learn at their own pace.

  19. Argumentative Essay Examples. Best Topics, Titles GradesFixer

    Our collection of argumentative essay examples covers various educational levels, from college to middle school, and different essay structures, including 5-paragraph and short essays. These samples provide practical insights into constructing compelling arguments, organizing essays effectively, and using evidence to support claims.

  20. 20+ Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School to Get Started

    May 31, 2023. An argumentative essay for middle school focuses on issues surrounding students in primary and secondary schools. And given that there are numerous topics to cover within this scope, it's important to focus on an area you can fully explore. To be clear, choosing the best topic to argue is the first step to writing an ...

  21. 20 Easy and Free Argumentative Essay Examples for Students

    Body paragraph 1. The first body paragraph discusses the first and most important point related to the argument. It starts with a topic sentence and has all the factual data to make the argument convincing. Body paragraph 2. The second body paragraph mentions the second most important element of the argument.

  22. 3 Types of Essays Your Middle Schoolers Need to Practice

    Types of Essays for Middle Schoolers. There are various types of essays out there, but there are three types I want to specifically look at: argumentative, literary analysis, and narrative. These types of essays cover both creative and critical thinking - and help push literary skills to the next level. Argumentative Writing.

  23. 75 Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School

    An example of such is the persuasive essay rubric middle school students are made or encouraged to write. Persuasive Essay Prompts Middle School Students Will Find Helpful. Choosing the right persuasive essay topic is as important as writing a good essay. This is because right from the topic you choose, you must be able to convince your readers ...

  24. The Endless Pursuit of Equality Through College Admissions

    In my high school it was pretty much mostly white, and I think I was the only Asian person in the school. Then I went to college, but I didn't study film. I went to Chicago and studied economics.